FRIHOST FORUMS SEARCH FAQ TOS BLOGS COMPETITIONS
You are invited to Log in or Register a free Frihost Account!

Destructive Self-Fulfilling Attributions




It is not fun doing something you may be able to achieve while you keep telling yourself that you are not going to succeed in it.

Very often you see people saying "I am no good at maths", but it doesn't have to be maths, one of my colleagues just happens to be complaining that "I am bad at stats". I am referring to statements that is of these forms in general.

More often you see people that say "I am no good at maths" stay no good at maths. This may reinforce this very belief among the same group. I see it as merely a result of a difference in perspective:
. . . Those who don't attribute their badness in maths to themselves have no reason to not improve. They are less likely to think that any failure they make is from their bad-at-it-ness, but simply that they have found something new they have to learn.
. . . Those who do demotivate their own learning. It is destructive to the learning process to attribute inability to a subject we have yet to come to understand. But if they are conscious of the weight of their statements and that they are the master of their own motivation, then I see no problem.

One of the things that makes it hard to deal with these cases is that they want to reply with "I just can't" every time. At least saying this is easier for them compared to the alternative of having to learn something that they think they are bad at.



5 blog comments below

Hmmmm interesting point Sylin. Another thought provoking topic.

I'd agree with what you say for the better part, but it could be that some (not all) of those who say they are not good at math, are making an honest statement. They know what their limitations are. Not every one's brain is wired for excelling at math, however could be they are challenged by that fact and just refuse to give up. I kind'a admire those people, as I like it when those who are more naturally gifted for the arts and literature, challenge themselves in an area they aren't naturally gifted in. And the other way round. Those for whom math comes perfectly naturally, and who are not as gifted in literature, give it a good bash, even when they're not that good at it. It may be an honest statement.
deanhills on Thu Oct 10, 2013 9:42 pm
What a person is naturally good (or not good) at is a very interesting topic in itself and makes us question the extent in which nature and nurture have a role in our character. I haven't touch upon this topic much myself, but I do think that it is a very interesting one.

I agree that some use of the statement "I am no good at x" is a perfectly valid one to make. I even make it myself sometimes where x = sports Embarassed
Quote:
I kind'a admire those people, as I like it when those who are more naturally gifted for the arts and literature, challenge themselves in an area they aren't naturally gifted in. And the other way round.
Indeed, it make me feel a little warmer inside seeing something like that.
The statement "I am no good at x" at the very least should not stop one from pursuing x if it is something one is passionate about. I always find it sad when it does.
Sylin on Thu Oct 10, 2013 10:30 pm
Sometimes it is not easy to overcome the psychological wounds that failure inflicts, because of lack of knowledge how to treat them. Failure is uncomforting, disappointing and hurting. However other than these apparent emotional problems, failure can force us on an insensible level too, and leave injuries that are far more psychologically overwhelming. Being familiar with the an assortment of psychological wounds we maintain when we are unsuccessful and learning how to treat them will help you get well more quickly and more completely, both emotionally and psychologically, and increase your probability of success in the future. What are the symptoms? Failure not only makes our objectives appear tougher but also makes our capabilities seem punier. Failure shocks our unconscious insights in a way that our targets seem far away than where they are and more out of attainablelevel. Failure not only harms our stimulation but also makes us risk reluctant. Failure not only limits our skill to imagine outside the box but also makes us undergo the feeling of unaided. Failures show the way us to make wrong and harmful sweeping statements. Are there methods that we overcome the impact of failure?
ibraltan1 on Sat Oct 11, 2014 1:36 pm
Sometimes, help is necessary to overcome.
kolaylezzet on Sat Oct 11, 2014 3:04 pm
We can learn how to defeat this feeling. First of all we must fight with misperception. Ewe must be familiar with that failures deform our opinions about the task itself and about our competence. We should not accept that we are incompetent. Accept a state of mind of determination and confidence and reject to surrender. We must revitalize our self-worth. We should struggle to pay no attention to our latest disappointment for a second and compose a list of the traits and competences we have that must (as a minimum, on paper) make it likely for us to accomplish something. If we have difficulty coming up with a list, request a buddy or somebody who is familiar with you well to take you back you of your potency. We must examine your list and reattach to our abilities. We must revitalize our self- worth. We should struggle to pay no attention to our latest disappointment for a second and we must revitalize our self- worth.
ibraltan1 on Sat Oct 11, 2014 5:17 pm



FRIHOST HOME | FAQ | TOS | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | SITE MAP
© 2005-2011 Frihost, forums powered by phpBB.