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Arch linux




I've installed and used Debian and lately ubuntu on my home server for a while now, I'm managing my synology nas mostly via ssh ( the web interface is a new experience every time I load it up in my browser ) ( yes I keep it updated ) and I've been running ' a' linux distro on my personal laptop for about a year now.

Last year I installed fedora ( first 24 and then updated to 25 ) and I like it ( I'm a gnome guy ) but the thing is, I don't llike the names these guys are using, Yes I'm aware that Fedora is sponsored by RedHat and that it's a cmmunity bla bla, still... every time I think of the word fedora I see a picture of a blue fish and the title says 'finding fedory'.
fedory says yum... hmmm I can picture the shark saying that he didn't eat fish the last 65 days ( with an english accent )
oh sorry, I forgot... it's dnf now... Jenny: 'hey what's wrong with your yum ( read 'legs')', Forrest:' Nothin's wrong with my yum, they've just been dandyfied...

I know it's a very good OS and as far as packages, updates and stability goes it's a very respectable OS and don't get me wrong, this distro is ranking at the top for me. the only issue I have with it is that the name just doesn't ring my bells ( I just don't want to use the word 'cool', ) ... ( cr*p I just did d'oh! )

so here I am, I've got a nice ( 2011) laptop sporting fedora 25, intel i7, 8GiB of Ram, 750GB HDD, NVIDIA GeForce GT 630M, aaargh who am I kidding, this is an asus K75VM which I bought back in 2011 for my evening school and is a piece of sh*t dinosour by now...
anyway, his post is about arch linux.


ARCH.... OMG have I been waiting for this distro all my life or what!
I've had some experience with debian and it's derivatives, I've also had some experience with fedora and CentOS which is the community edition of RedHat and all of these distro's are easy to install ( I prefer the debian installer over the one used by Fedora and CentOS )

what bothers me is that none of these distro's actually teach you anything about how the internals of a linux, or as Stallman calls it 'GNU/Linux", machine work.

to get a better understanding of about how a linux computer spins it's gears I had completd the LFS book, this was little over 2 years ago and it has helped me a lot. it boils down to this. you create a tool set that you need to build the kernel and packages and then you chroot into the environment, build other stuff and then you create a bootable image which loads nothing but the bare essentials. there's no package management, no updates, nada... with LFS you're on your own, heck, with LFS you didn't even create your own distro, you created a distro known to the rest of the world as 'linux from scratch"

arch reminded me a lot of LFS... you download an iso, burn that iso to a flash drive and boot into a live OS.
ALL installation steps are manually executed on the shell, I'm talking settings, partitions, swap, etc... and you end up with a textual linux distro that doesn't even have a window manager or desktop environment.

The package repository may not be one of the larger ones but there's plenty of software, and if you can't find it there I'm sure you can find it in the aur, and if not there... you compile... love it..

documentation... this was one of the key factors in getting me to install arch... all the the documentation you need can be foundi t's wiki... Im in love

Code:
[marco@asusarch ~]$ alsi

                  ##         OS: Arch Linux x86_64
                 ####         Hostname: asusarch
                ######         Uptime: 1:05, 52 sec
               ########         Kernel: 4.11.3-1-ARCH
              ##########      Shell: /bin/bash
             ############      Packages: 881
            ##############      Window Manager: Unknown
           ################      RAM: 1674M / 7678M (21%)
          ##################      SWAP: 0M / 14335M (0%)
         ####################      CPU: Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-3610QM CPU @ 2.30GHz
        ######################      Boot: 34M / 1022M (4%) (vfat)
       #########      #########      Home: 393M / 653G (1%) (ext4)
      ##########      ##########   Root: 6,0G / 20G (32%) (ext4)
     ###########      ###########   
    ##########          ##########   
   #######                  #######   
  ####                          ####   
 ###                              ###   

[marco@asusarch ~]$



If you're new to linux... most people will say 'try ubuntu' and in a way they're right... Arch is not a beginner distro.
But then again, some please say that ASM and C are the best language to start with when you want to learn how to program... so if you want to get your feet wet and have got a lot of patience, get to it... https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/installation_guide



6 blog comments below

I don't use Arch Linux on a regular basis anymore because I prefer something more stable, but I agree that Arch Linux is a great distro that can learn you a lot. Just make sure you have access to a second computer while installing so that you can look things up during the installation process. I especially love their package manager pacman.
Peterssidan on Sat Jun 10, 2017 12:24 pm
I did try linux from scratch and successfully boot one but not that happy. The only thing I did realize in the process was creating a linux distro is very hard and I am very greatfull for those who have given their operating system free to the general public which asking only for a part of what you can give and most of the time none for a regular user. There is a huge difference between LFS and Archlinux, LFS is your going to create the distro from scratch and all the things pertaining to the distro will be your complete responsibility from top to bottom and for Archlinux installing the base system will be their responsibility as well as the package management. The only thing you have to do is to decide what flavor of operating system you want to do. It is a laptop, a desktop, a server and etc.. which what makes Archlinux very flexible. Archlinux will provide you of all components and even documentation for a particular package.
jestoy0514 on Sun Jun 11, 2017 8:06 am
I have always wanted to try to install Arch linux, but it seems intimidating, would you care to share how many hours does it took to do the first correct boot?
restonpiston on Sat Jun 24, 2017 4:00 pm
It is intimidating at first but as soon as you get the base system up and running you feel much more at ease. Installing the base and configuration can reach up to an hour or less. But due to the fact that you have to select all the components your self from the ground up, I suggest to create a plan on what is your purpose with the operating system and then choose the necessary packages. For example for me I need it for my laptop so what I did. I search for a tutorial for installing the base system and then search on how to install lxde desktop environment, and last but not the east I made a list of applications which I like to see on the newly build Archlinux system. I hope this helps.
jestoy0514 on Sun Jun 25, 2017 5:25 am
Yeah, it helps a lot, I hope some day soon I have enough free time and will to install it myself, the idea of an OS so customizable appeals me.
restonpiston on Wed Jul 05, 2017 11:02 pm
Yes me too.
jestoy0514 on Thu Jul 06, 2017 5:47 am



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