FRIHOST FORUMS SEARCH FAQ TOS BLOGS COMPETITIONS
You are invited to Log in or Register a free Frihost Account!

Misspellings... they annoy me.




Now, I recognize that no one is perfect, and everyone makes mistakes from time to time... but I can be somewhat pedantic when words are misspelled; especially when using common homonyms. It can take some effort to ignore when these come up; I make the effort to read them as intended, rather than what they say.

Infamous examples would include:
.: loose in place of lose. When something has gone missing, it's not necessarily wobbly. We rarely see this go the opposite direction
.: your, you're
.: they're, their, there
There are more, but, these are perennial favorites... so common one might think they would be easily noted.

These are all words that are brought up and cleared up in education from elementary school through high school... there's no real excuse for perpetual misuse. Accidents happen, but, these are words that are misused consistently.



16 blog comments below

Mis-spellings/use can be annoying but only if the errors are from someone that I know English is their first language. For many here, English is a second or third language and I can easily understand their confusion.
Some other forums I visit, those people have absolutely no excuse for the stupidity since English is their only language.

BTW: I do like the spell check feature in many browsers. Now if only they could correct grammar!
standready on Wed Dec 07, 2011 12:31 am
Absolutely, and I feel the same way; second language errors are no big deal. My beef is with English first or only language speakers. Basic literacy seems appallingly out of reach for all too many.

Spell check can only go so far, the examples I gave above are fine examples of errors that will not be caught by a spell check. They are properly spelled words, they're just the wrong one. A good grammar check would be handy, for sure, but it would just be a bandage over the actual underlying problem.
Ankhanu on Wed Dec 07, 2011 12:50 am
English is not my first language but I really watch for my spellings. Lose, loss, lose, lost... They're pretty much confusing for me as well. Besides you're-your, their-they're, there's also it's-its, his-he's. And there's also those which I have to stop and think, does e goes after i or the other way around, should I spell it with two m or two r, or should I spell them as one word or should it be two words. Everytime and theirselves has always been a pitfall for me. And I just misspelled pitfall. Started with pitful, then pitfull, and finally got it right. And on my way through that previous sentence, I misspelled misspelled with mispelled. *sigh*

And what about punctuation? or phrases treated as one sentence?
loremar on Wed Dec 07, 2011 12:54 am
You do quite well, loremar. Honestly, aside from some unusual grammatical choices, many English as second language speakers (once they reach a certain level of proficiency, at least) have vastly better spelling than English primaries, for exactly the reason you outline: they pay more attention to what they're trying to say. Native English speakers are (Generalization!) lazy with their sentences.

Punctuation does get on my nerves, but, I also recognize my overuse and improper use of certain elements, such as ellipses and semicolons. I'm also terrible for using passive voice and occasional fragments. In general, minor syntax errors are easier to bypass than glaring spelling mistakes.
Yes, the same arguments that I use for proper spelling or word choices apply equally to punctuation and sentence fragments, and I'm being a little hypocritical, but, I never said I wasn't Wink
Ankhanu on Wed Dec 07, 2011 1:08 am
--- double post ---
truespeed on Wed Dec 07, 2011 3:28 am
Loose for lose is really common on the internet,i have no idea why,even bikerman spells lose as loose and he's a teacher.
truespeed on Wed Dec 07, 2011 3:28 am
I've, uh... I've noticed this Wink
Ankhanu on Wed Dec 07, 2011 4:28 am
The one that annoys me the most because this happens when writing and when talking is when people say, "I could care less." If the person saying that thought about the meaning of their statement for a mere thirty seconds they would realize that the correct phrase should be "I could not care less."
Afaceinthematrix on Wed Dec 07, 2011 4:58 am
Same here, Matrix Smile

I think this is more of a regional issue than something widespread, but, the misuse of "seen" really gets my goat. For example, I seen that dog cross the street. Throw a "have" or "had" in there, or just use "saw"... geez!
Ankhanu on Wed Dec 07, 2011 5:20 am
Someone just misspelled lose with loose a while ago.
Quote:
A name change would do more harm than good. Not to mention we would loose all the SEO work done since 2005.

http://www.frihost.com/forums/vt-131866.html
lol. Sorry Ghost Rider. Razz
loremar on Wed Dec 07, 2011 6:41 am
Afaceinthematrix wrote:
The one that annoys me the most because this happens when writing and when talking is when people say, "I could care less. If the person saying that thought about the meaning of their statement for a mere thirty seconds they would realize that the correct phrase should be "I could not care less.""

I disagree! What you forget is that the phrase "I could care less" is generally meant with mild sarcasm or a jaunty emphasis on the word 'could' - thus implying that although the speaker could technically care less, it is not a very likely possibility on account of how little they care now.
Nameless on Wed Dec 07, 2011 3:40 pm
I don't know, Nameless. Any time I've seen/heard it used, it's implicit meaning was "I don't care". To say that you could care less implies caring at all, while saying that you could not care less informs of a lack of caring.
Ankhanu on Wed Dec 07, 2011 4:52 pm
I don't know but the phrase was originally 'I couldn't care less' so I guess 'I could care less' is either a mistaken interpretation or a rather mundane youthful twist on the original.
Hello_World on Thu Dec 08, 2011 10:27 am
"I could care less" means you have to add "but I'm too stupid to care".
loremar on Thu Dec 08, 2011 2:51 pm
Quote:
I disagree! What you forget is that the phrase "I could care less" is generally meant with mild sarcasm or a jaunty emphasis on the word 'could' - thus implying that although the speaker could technically care less, it is not a very likely possibility on account of how little they care now.


I never hear it like that. Every single time I ever here people say "I could care less" the person really means that they couldn't care less. I hear this almost every day.
Afaceinthematrix on Sun Dec 11, 2011 3:38 am
I don't think all people with English as a first language are necessarily by default good at spelling. Not all people have a knack for language period. I also think some are posting from their phones, and that could be responsible for plenty of typos; I can't imagine the phones have sophisticated editing tools. I value great posts, but don't expect everyone to post to the same standard. Think the only time I get irritated is when it is obvious that the person who wrote the post did not care, or was deliberately spamming.
deanhills on Sun Dec 11, 2011 7:59 am



FRIHOST HOME | FAQ | TOS | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | SITE MAP
© 2005-2011 Frihost, forums powered by phpBB.