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What Made You Switch To Linux?





lsjohnson
I first tried Linux a few years ago, not because I was completely against Windows or anything like that, but just because I had some free time on my hands. I started off with Mandrake 9.0 which was very user friendly and Windows-like. After reading through a bunch of message boards and learning which distros are good for what, I soon realized my current distro was great for Linux noobs. So then I decided to try something a little more advanced like Slackware which I knew had a steep learning curve.

Since then I've been using Slackware as my main OS and couldn't be happier. Of course somethings are a pain in the ass to configure, but that;s Slack for you. If it ain't hard, then you won't learn anything from it.

That's my story, I basically started to learn Linux because I was bored.
LukeakaDanish
I used ubuntu for a while, but switched back to winXP because warcraft III plays badly on wine, and hosting games is poor because all the hosting related scripts for warcraft III are released for windows only.

Also not being able to play music i bought on iTunes somewhat irritated me.
KHO
well as unrelated as it may be, you could have converted that music to a mp3 format on your windows itunes install then it would run fine.

But back on topic, I switched to linux because I am very good with windows, pretty decent at mac, and decided to go to the next step and build a linux box.... Well I blew that box up pretty bad haha. I played around with a bunch of things and ended up screwing up the install and just put xp back on the box. I recently switched back though because my only real use for windows is for games, and I dont play games often so I decided to go back since I know xp is very slow and linux has always been faster.
Studio Madcrow
I switched to Linux simply because it's free. I was building a new computer and needed an OS to run on it and didn't wan't to buy Windows. So I got Linux instead.
hummer010
There was a software package that I wanted to use for a project that was linux only. I installed ubuntu 6.06 in a VM to use it. Shortly after that, my personal computer as Debian only, and has been since.

I'd used linux on and off over the years before that, but that was the point that I made the complete changeover.
hunnyhiteshseth
Linux was in my college course and that forced me to switch. Embarassed Razz
Agent ME
I switched to Ubuntu Linux shortly after reading this article about DRM in windows. The idea of the low-level parts of computers gradually becoming shut off to users and secret to windows scared me, and I got the idea to try linux. A few weeks later when I had some time, I put linux on my laptop and have only booted into windows a few times to play a few games before I got them working under linux.
Diablosblizz
I switched, and currently using, to Ubuntu for the heck of it. I decided that I knew Windows enough that it was time to branch out. Windows XP is also very plain, so getting Compiz-Fusion for Ubuntu was freaking awesome for me. I just installed it a few weeks ago, still trying to get everything in order. I'm also running it off of my entertainment drive, so all my pictures and whatnot have no room. Sad I'm looking into adding another hard drive to the computer.

Just getting all my Windows programs on Linux is a lengthly task.
Fire Boar
I needed some way of programming. This includes both online and offline stuff. I found myself using all sorts of apps (WAMP, Visual Studio, etc.) that have better Linux alternatives, which run faster, are free and take up less space.

I also wanted to see what all the fuss was about. I decided to shrink my XP partition and use Linux on that, and wow, am I glad I did. I triple-booted Vista/XP/Ubuntu Gutsy for a while before backing everything up, wiping my disk and reinstalling everything to a clean XP/Kubuntu Hardy setup. No problems at all, everything works perfectly. I only ever need XP for doing podcasts because I haven't managed to get my microphone working under Linux (it's a weird USB one that not many people have).
DoctorBeaver
I swapped because my install of XP got corrupted. I tried sorting it out but it seems my XP repair disk was also corrupt.

I didn't want to buy a new XP disk, or pay anyone to repair it for me, so I decided to try Linux. After reading about the different distros, I went for Ubuntu Hardy Heron for the main reason that I could download the ISO & try it out before I installed it properly.
bissoboa
Quote:
If it ain't hard, then you won't learn anything from it.


yeah that rocks! Razz
I fully agree, only notify that sometimes it needs a little help.

I switched to linux at all since 3 years ago, when I bought my first computer, a laptop - a very nice and professional one by the way.
The morning I took it from the megastore, the afternoon evening and night installed gentoo with a friend of mine.
I was always attracted from linux and computer networks... So as soon as I got it then I have never left.
I think I love it for its "customizableship" and ergonimics.
Goodbye
Ankhanu
DoctorBeaver wrote:
I swapped because my install of XP got corrupted. I tried sorting it out but it seems my XP repair disk was also corrupt.

I didn't want to buy a new XP disk, or pay anyone to repair it for me, so I decided to try Linux. After reading about the different distros, I went for Ubuntu Hardy Heron for the main reason that I could download the ISO & try it out before I installed it properly.


Though I'd played around with a couple distros in the past for short periods, I had a similar situation push me to simply install Ubuntu and use it for a year and a half or so as the main OS on one of my systems.

As for why I started playing around with Linux, well... it only makes sense to be able to use a computer no matter what OS it's running. I was curious about it, wanted to have the skill set to be at least a little competent if I was on a system running it, so I gave it a go.
zellfaze
I switched to Linux mostly because of the idealisms that go with it. I liked the idea of a Free Operating System (as in speech, not lunch). I have stayed with Linux, because I found that it runs a lot faster than Windows most of the time.

Also, I just don't like Microsoft as a company.
surdy
When i started learning LINUX , I didn't think that i would kick windows out. it was just a learning experience. One great professor at the Computer Science Deptt. of our university was a Linux enthusiast and started a program to familiarize his students with Linux. I came to know about it from a friend in that deptt. and started going for those classes after my classes.
He exposed us to Redhat 9(the latest redhat distro available then).
I started using it and absolutely loved it. What i loved most about it was the rich command line which gave me so much more power and control over my system. Also it worked considerably faster than Windows on my system and even got better speed for the internet.
I fully understood the concept of FSF and GNU much later than i fell in love with linux . But i started loving linux even more after that.
furtasacra
I decided to try Linux because I was fed up with Windows doing things I didn't like behind my back, and just stupid stuff, like grubbing around in the registry files for hours to get rid of that hideous green start button.

It's my computer, dammit, and I shouldn't have to spend extra money or go through nine kinds of hell just to change the color of a button that clashes with the background image on my desktop!

I know it's petty of me, but I couldn't start up the machine without being annoyed by that fugly button.
mehulved
I migrated to linux after my friend introduced me to it. I was facing a lot of virus problems in XP then. So, my friend installed Fedora Core 1 on my system as a dual boot. i started liking the 'new OS' on my system and gradually moved to linux over next 6 months. Finally one day my windows was wiped off due to a freak accident and I totally moved to linux then.
moofang
Hehe, I went to a linux talk completely ignorant of what linux is. I stole a Ubuntu Feisty CD from there and stupidly decided to set aside (only!) 4GB on my hard drive to try it out. Before long I found I couldn't stop using linux, and would often be seen banging my head against the wall for only having 4GB to spend on linux apps (but man it was amazingly usable in that 4GB! Windows Vista eats up in excess of 10GB on clean install -_-).

The next holiday I wiped my vista partition clean, stretched my ext3 partition to 45 GB and chucked Vista back into a 20GB partition (and man, was it cramped in there), setting up a dual boot configuration which lasted till this day.
warriorpoets
I had a WinXP/Ubuntu Hardy Heron setup dual-booting for a long time... until three days ago when the hard drive hosting the / partition for my Linux install went belly-up. Sad

I really love Ubuntu though. When i scrounge enough money together for a new hard drive, I'd like to see about getting it back up and running. I also have a Debian server on my home network that has had the same install (I've upgraded it a couple times with an apt-get update/upgrade/dist-upgrade whenever a new Stable version was released, but it's the same install with the same /home and configuration) for three years now. <3
djclue917
I switched to Linux mainly because I think it performs a lot faster and in a more predictable fashion than any Microsoft operating system. I've never really had a "real crash" and the only "crashes" that were logged happened during power outages. (a desktop computer without a UPS, sadly)

I first started with Kubuntu 5.04. I actually didn't use it a lot until after a couple of months, when I actually got a little more involved with discovering some pretty awesome and interesting software. As far as I can remember, the Kubuntu docs really helped me a lot back then. I've also switched DEs and tried GNOME when Ubuntu 5.10 was released. I eventually returned to KDE because I find GNOME just a little too simple for a power user like me.

Feeling a bit more enthusiastic and confident with my Linux skills, I decided to try Arch Linux. Of course, at first, I was a little lost since Arch was a totally different beast compared to K/Ubuntu. I've been using Arch and have enjoyed the life on the bleeding edge since June/July 2006. However, I'm planning to go back to Kubuntu 8.10, now that KDE 4.1 is released and is quite usable for me, once I get my first notebook.

Arch is nice but needs a lot of tinkering. Now, I just want to lay back and enjoy the Linux experience like a "normal user".
ehpc
I just became feeling bad about Microsoft, it's monopoly, it's products. I became sick of it. Previously I tried using different linux distributions. But they all was too unhuman. But when my anger crossed a line, I just wiped out all traces of Windows and installed Ubuntu. And never switched back to Windows. I like Ubuntu very much. It's so powerful! No comparison to Microsoft products.
sondosia
The main reason I switched to Linux was because my Windows OS had an epic fail. I managed to rescue all my files using rescue mode, but I knew that I'd had enough, so I switched to Linux.

It's also because Linux doesn't have such a problem with spyware and viruses, and because I can do stuff like convert videos without having to buy software (or, even worse, use shareware that screws up my system). So yeah, I'm glad I switched.
djclue917
At first I didn't really liked Linux because I learned how to use a computer using Windows. In other words, the familiarity/user-friendliness effect took place. However, when I started poking at stuff and probably breaking some too, I realized how much fun and painful it was. Yeah, it was like a two-fold adventure for me. I never really understood the philosophy of FOSS back then that's why I didn't really care and I considered Linux as just a play thing. But when I became really involved with FOSS advocacy and development, I realized just how much I like and love using Linux and other free software.

Linux made me the sole commander of my computer, unlike Windows who tries very hard to obscure and hide what it's actually doing with the computer. In short, I like being in control of almost everything that has to do with my computer. Of course, I love the stability too. Now, I never have to worry about crashing applications bringing down the whole system. (Well, Xorg kinda does that by making the input peripherals freeze but you can easily get back on track with a simple SSH to your machine. Wink )
internetjobs
we can say so many points for switching to linux...
fist one is performance.. its giving good performance as the hardware originally have..
it wont eat any kind of RAM usage..
its more stable as well as hard to attack for viruses... Very Happy
so.. its very good for application as well as web server

But we have to still use windows server as it has many features for Domain controllers.. Smile
william
I wanted to leave the dark side. Laughing

Just kidding. But I had tried out Linux many times in the past, and then I decided that Windows was slowing down my productivity, so I decided to make the switch to Linux. Well, not really, I run a dual boot, because of certain applications and games. WINE works most of the time, but I simply prefer booting into Windows. I still haven't been successful in getting a virtual machine running, so I could run Windows inside Linux.

1111 posts
rvec
I wanted a server, and only had an old 300mhz <100mb RAM pc to run it on. So I didn't really have a choice there (or maybe dos with apache Razz ). I installed Ubuntu without a gui on it, and a year ago I switched to Debian (about the same but I like the name Debian more Razz ), and at the same time upgraded the pc a bit (now 700mhz and 256mb ram).

The server crashed today, and I think it has something to do with the hdd (going to examine that when I get home). I might try slackware on a new pc now, but first I have to try to get as much data out as possible.

I still use XP on my own pc though. Much easier for running the usual games and apps there (maybe I should try dual boot).
Jaan
Nothing. If I could play CoD4 or CoDWaW then I would switch Razz:PXD
lagoon
I still use and will always use Windows. Whether I make it a dual-boot machine is another story, but I haven't encountered any reason to change.
djclue917
Jaan wrote:
Nothing. If I could play CoD4 or CoDWaW then I would switch Razz:PXD


You could actually play some native Windows games on Linux via some compatibility layer like WINE or Cedega. But of course, it would have some performance hit due to the operation of the compatibility layer.
Fire Boar
djclue917 wrote:
Jaan wrote:
Nothing. If I could play CoD4 or CoDWaW then I would switch Razz:PXD


You could actually play some native Windows games on Linux via some compatibility layer like WINE or Cedega. But of course, it would have some performance hit due to the operation of the compatibility layer.


Not necessarily actually. I've experienced much better performance under Wine than Windows on a couple of apps.
ianlacy
Ok so here's my Linux story...

A few years ago, I somehow stumbled upon knoppix and thought it was really cool that I could boot an operating system off a cd. I had never heard of an OS other than Mac and Windows. So I did some more looking around and playing with Knoppix.

Then one day I stumbled on a Linux mag at Borders. I believe its Linux Format. Anyways, they had a copy of Mandriva Free 2008. So I played with that for a little while and I wasn't really all that impressed, I was just having fun playing with something other than Windows for once. It was different, and I had an open mind.

So I went back to Windows. Now somewhere after this I discovered Open Source Software because of a video project I needed to do for school (I didn't know previously what open source was, or that I had had any experience with it with Linux. I just didn't know Linux was open source). Once I discovered the multitude of open source software out there. I never went back to searching for "freeware." Open source software was like classy freeware. It was just so much better.

So then I discovered Ubuntu. I thought hey, if this mandriva distro isn't working for me, why not try a different one? I really didn't think there would be much of a difference. I thought Linux was Linux. By this time I knew Linux was open source.

However, I was extremely impressed with Ubuntu. I've been using it ever sense. I learned pretty much everything I know about Linux today from Ubuntu.

The only problem I'm having with Ubuntu is that there are a few problems that I have with advanced development stuff. This is mainly because Ubuntu has somewhat drifted away from the standards of linux and made their architecture or something a little goofy. For instance, I can't install the 8.28.8 ati drivers for my laptop because they wont compile under ubuntu 8.04....

anyways to get back on topic....Linux was pretty much just an accident for me.

-Ian
jmraker
I got into linux 10 years ago because we used it at work on some of the servers, and I got to use it for all my work. When I lost that job, I missed the linux way of doing things, got sick of windows NT and switched to Redhat, then Mandriva. I still use an old version of Mandriva but for some reason I think I'll try ubuntu
djclue917
Fire Boar wrote:
djclue917 wrote:
Jaan wrote:
Nothing. If I could play CoD4 or CoDWaW then I would switch Razz:PXD


You could actually play some native Windows games on Linux via some compatibility layer like WINE or Cedega. But of course, it would have some performance hit due to the operation of the compatibility layer.


Not necessarily actually. I've experienced much better performance under Wine than Windows on a couple of apps.


Well, that could probably be true for a handful of apps, but for games, especially those graphics-intensive ones, the performance hit would almost always be there, and quite noticeable.
Fire Boar
djclue917 wrote:
Fire Boar wrote:
djclue917 wrote:
Jaan wrote:
Nothing. If I could play CoD4 or CoDWaW then I would switch Razz:PXD


You could actually play some native Windows games on Linux via some compatibility layer like WINE or Cedega. But of course, it would have some performance hit due to the operation of the compatibility layer.


Not necessarily actually. I've experienced much better performance under Wine than Windows on a couple of apps.


Well, that could probably be true for a handful of apps, but for games, especially those graphics-intensive ones, the performance hit would almost always be there, and quite noticeable.


World of Warcraft being one of those programs. There were a couple of other games too. Remember, Wine Is Not an Emulator.
djclue917
Whoever said that WINE is an emulator? WINE serves as an intermediary layer between Windows apps and the underlying Linux system. In simple terms, a translator of Windows calls to Linux system calls. Since another layer is introduced, one can expect a degradation in performance. Of course, some apps may run even better with WINE. This might be due to WINE's "Windows implementation" being more efficient/coded better compared to a corresponding native Windows code.

Also, take note that performance of graphics drivers for Linux and Windows are not always on par. This can also contribute to the overall performance perceived by the user. Well, at least now, we can safely say that the performance of Windows and Linux (the binary drivers for ATI and NVIDIA, unfortunately) drivers of major and/or popular cards are more or less on par.
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