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The Truths of Columbus





polygon
In school, we are all taught that "Columbus Sailed the Ocean Blue in 1492, then he discovered America." Is that all really true? Here is what really happened:

Columbus was off to find America: NOT! Columbus was NOT off to find a new country, he was off to find a new route to India. Even after many expeditions to the "New World," Columbus STILL thought that he was visiting India.

Columbus discovered America: NOT! Columbus never really landed in America. He went to the Bahamas on his first trip and South America on some other trips.

Columbus went west to find spices, like those found in India: SOMEWHAT. What he really needed to find was gold. Otherwise, Queen Isabella and King Fedinand (his sponsors) would just stop supplying him.

The Natives of the Bahamas couldn't have been cannibals. Otherwise, Columbus would have been eaten...NOT! Columbus landed on the right island by luck. The other islands were full of cannibals.

More facts:

Columbus wanted more gold, so he enslaved a lot of Natives to help him.

Columbus delivered the small pox disease to the unimmune natives.

All facts were recived from the book: Oh, Yikes! Shocked
truespeed
polygon wrote:
In school, we are all taught that "Columbus Sailed the Ocean Blue in 1492, then he discovered America." Is that all really true? Here is what really happened:

Columbus was off to find America: NOT! Columbus was NOT off to find a new country, he was off to find a new route to India.


I thought this was common knowledge.



polygon wrote:
Columbus discovered America: NOT! Columbus never really landed in America. He went to the Bahamas on his first trip and South America on some other trips.


Isn't South America and the Bahamas still America?
polygon
By America, I meant the US.
truespeed
polygon wrote:
By America, I meant the US.


I guessed you meant that.

Heres the wiki on Columbus and his voyages.


According to that he made four voyages,and your right in saying he never visited North America,although there are no reasons given as to why,maybe because North Americans weren't as advanced in their civilizations as their southern counterparts.

Anyway it has been argued that the Vikings got there many years before him.
guitar22891
Yes I totally agree with you. There are many "heroes" that history books portray. We love to put up regular sinful people such as greedy columbus up on a throne.

Read the nove: "Lies my teacher told me." Columbus is all over the first chapter.
Underprotest
What I always found to be the most surprising fact about Columbus, or rather, about the world at that time, was that no one thought the world was flat. It was well established fact that it was round. And everyone thought the world was bigger than Columbus did, such that it was completely infeasible for them to sail around it to India...something -they were right on-. Columbus thought the world was 1/3 less wide in circumference then was actually the case, and so figured he could make it to India by sailing west...it was only the amazingly good luck of a continent in between Spain and India that he didn't die due to that particular miscalculation.
isranet
i think we all learned about it at school
atul2242
For the Europeans Columbas discovered America.

In honor they set up a school - St. Columba's School in Delhi -
This is what they say-
St. Columba’s School promotes the harmonious growth of the whole person – a syntheses of faith, life and culture. Set up in 1941, SCS is a dream school, an ornament to the city of New Delhi, a monument to the educational zeal of the Christian Brothers. It imparts love and appreciation of the spiritual values of life that lie beyond all thinking and all actions – that lie at the very base of civilized society.
flytye4life
Alot of deception is taught in history books about explorers and inventors. More often than not they are the people given credit for finding of discovering something but they actually either stole an idea or followed lead of others
Solon_Poledourus
j14fusion14 wrote:
Columbus discovered American, Christopher Columbus (Italian: Cristoforo Colombo) (1451[1] – May 20, 1506) was an Italian navigator

I have to stop you right there. He was Genoese. And try not to plagiarize Wikipedia without citing it as a source. Changing a few words here and there doesn't make it your own.
Another theory is that Colombo had a map, which was later captured by a Turkish admiral named Piri Reis, that clearly indicated the west coast of north, central, and south America. This map was compiled in 1513 from older source maps, according to the Turks. The older source maps date back to Alexander of the Three Horns, which is the name the Arabs had for Alexander the Great, and some source maps even dating back to Ptolemy.
It's a highly controversial idea, but one worth noting.
Kopernikus
atul2242 wrote:
For the Europeans Columbas discovered America.

In honor they set up a school - St. Columba's School in Delhi -
This is what they say-
St. Columba’s School promotes the harmonious growth of the whole person – a syntheses of faith, life and culture. Set up in 1941, SCS is a dream school, an ornament to the city of New Delhi, a monument to the educational zeal of the Christian Brothers. It imparts love and appreciation of the spiritual values of life that lie beyond all thinking and all actions – that lie at the very base of civilized society.


*LOL*
deanhills
Solon_Poledourus wrote:
j14fusion14 wrote:
Columbus discovered American, Christopher Columbus (Italian: Cristoforo Colombo) (1451[1] – May 20, 1506) was an Italian navigator

I have to stop you right there. He was Genoese. And try not to plagiarize Wikipedia without citing it as a source. Changing a few words here and there doesn't make it your own.
Another theory is that Colombo had a map, which was later captured by a Turkish admiral named Piri Reis, that clearly indicated the west coast of north, central, and south America. This map was compiled in 1513 from older source maps, according to the Turks. The older source maps date back to Alexander of the Three Horns, which is the name the Arabs had for Alexander the Great, and some source maps even dating back to Ptolemy.
It's a highly controversial idea, but one worth noting.
So it was an Italian then that started the whole colonial thing in North America? I found the following interesting article on him in the Capitalist Magazine:
http://www.capmag.com/article.asp?ID=1967
Libby
The anarchist community in Columbus OH calls their home "Arawak City" instead.

I think that's pretty awesome. Very Happy
wanshi
polygon wrote:
In school, we are all taught that "Columbus Sailed the Ocean Blue in 1492, then he discovered America." Is that all really true? Here is what really happened:

Columbus was off to find America: NOT! Columbus was NOT off to find a new country, he was off to find a new route to India. Even after many expeditions to the "New World," Columbus STILL thought that he was visiting India.

Columbus discovered America: NOT! Columbus never really landed in America. He went to the Bahamas on his first trip and South America on some other trips.

Columbus went west to find spices, like those found in India: SOMEWHAT. What he really needed to find was gold. Otherwise, Queen Isabella and King Fedinand (his sponsors) would just stop supplying him.

The Natives of the Bahamas couldn't have been cannibals. Otherwise, Columbus would have been eaten...NOT! Columbus landed on the right island by luck. The other islands were full of cannibals.

More facts:

Columbus wanted more gold, so he enslaved a lot of Natives to help him.

Columbus delivered the small pox disease to the unimmune natives.

All facts were recived from the book: Oh, Yikes! Shocked



I hear this for the first time , is this true?
Libby
wanshi wrote:
I hear this for the first time , is this true?


Columbus definitely wasn't looking for the new world, he found it pretty much by accident.

And of course he didn't "discover" it at all, as the American Indians were already there for a very long time, and the Vikings had visited, and maybe various ancient civilizations of Africa and Asia. And as the person above noted, he didn't actually land in North America.

He and his soldiers committed genocide against the native people in the Bahamas, enslaving and killing millions of people. All for some gold.

http://www.americanheritage.com/articles/magazine/ah/1975/6/1975_6_4.shtml

It truly is sickening that he is held up as a hero. He was just another greedy plunderer, kidnapper, and murderer, only an exceptionally ruthless one.

As for the smallpox, basically any person from Europe brought that over because Europeans had developed an immunity to it in Roman times. The sailors took syphilis back though.
matam
It is true! By the way, it mean is America continent.
deanhills
Libby wrote:
wanshi wrote:
I hear this for the first time , is this true?


Columbus definitely wasn't looking for the new world, he found it pretty much by accident.

And of course he didn't "discover" it at all, as the American Indians were already there for a very long time, and the Vikings had visited, and maybe various ancient civilizations of Africa and Asia. And as the person above noted, he didn't actually land in North America.

He and his soldiers committed genocide against the native people in the Bahamas, enslaving and killing millions of people. All for some gold.

http://www.americanheritage.com/articles/magazine/ah/1975/6/1975_6_4.shtml

It truly is sickening that he is held up as a hero. He was just another greedy plunderer, kidnapper, and murderer, only an exceptionally ruthless one.

As for the smallpox, basically any person from Europe brought that over because Europeans had developed an immunity to it in Roman times. The sailors took syphilis back though.
Very good posting thanks Libby. Totally agreed. Worst part is that it has been pushed down children's throats at school to the point of nausea. Time to get real.
atleetalie
I don't know what kind of school you were at, but I was told this story from the beginning. But it is said that the Vikings discovered the US before Columbus was even born.
Libby
atleetalie wrote:
I don't know what kind of school you were at


Educational standards (and how well those standards are lived up to) differ from area to area and school to school. I went to a public school in a West Virginia, and we were taught that Columbus was a brave intelligent explorer who revealed to the world that the earth was round, who "discovered" America, who "civilized" the natives. This was about 15 years ago. I bet kids all over the country still learn the same thing. Maybe your school was enlightened enough to tell the truth but mine wasn't. And apparently the OP's school wasn't either.

(edited for unnecessary snark, sorry)
deanhills
atleetalie wrote:
I don't know what kind of school you were at, but I was told this story from the beginning. But it is said that the Vikings discovered the US before Columbus was even born.
Right, but Vikings are only mentioned "in passing" and very little is said about them. Nor the possibility that there could have been explorers from Africa as well. Focus is completely on Columbus. Also very little is mentioned about the link-up with Asia and the Indians.
Solon_Poledourus
The funny thing is, Columbus wasn't even a national hero until relatively recently. For about 300 years he was seen as nothing but an obscure historical figure who died in poverty amidst legal woes, until a book was written, making him out to be a hero. He sort of faded into history as a nobody until 1829 when Washington Irving wrote his own version(a mostly fictional account) of Columbus' life. The book became extremely popular, and was the biggest contributing factor to making Columbus a pop culture icon and national treasure. For almost 100 years, Irving's book was the main piece of literature for information on Columbus, and still influences the historical view of Columbus.

He was a thief, a slave trader, a marauder, a pirate, a murderer, a liar... the list goes on and on. One thing he was not, was a man worthy of the status given to him in history books.
deanhills
Solon_Poledourus wrote:
The funny thing is, Columbus wasn't even a national hero until relatively recently. For about 300 years he was seen as nothing but an obscure historical figure who died in poverty amidst legal woes, until a book was written, making him out to be a hero. He sort of faded into history as a nobody until 1829 when Washington Irving wrote his own version(a mostly fictional account) of Columbus' life. The book became extremely popular, and was the biggest contributing factor to making Columbus a pop culture icon and national treasure. For almost 100 years, Irving's book was the main piece of literature for information on Columbus, and still influences the historical view of Columbus.

He was a thief, a slave trader, a marauder, a pirate, a murderer, a liar... the list goes on and on. One thing he was not, was a man worthy of the status given to him in history books.
Wonder what he would have thought about the hype if he could look at it from where he is from the outside in. Probably give him quite a big laugh. Or who knows, possibly he believed in his own ego to the point of bursting with it Smile
Solon_Poledourus
deanhills wrote:
Wonder what he would have thought about the hype if he could look at it from where he is from the outside in. Probably give him quite a big laugh. Or who knows, possibly he believed in his own ego to the point of bursting with it
That's quite likely. But I think that he might be surprised to see all the iconic imagery, and the way we view him, given that he felt betrayed by the Spanish Crown for breaking their deal to pay him 10% of all money earned from the New World. But then, he might feel like he deserved to be worshiped, because he did go quite insane. He claimed to hear gods voice, and he even tried to get a new crusade started to recapture Jerusalem.
fullmetalalki
hehe, it wasn't even the vikings, soo many people traveled to the Americas before Columbus ever set foot there. The least of which was 1 Polish guy but you can imagine that others randomly stumbled upon the land, especially if setting sail from Asian
ciureanuc
I think that it's obvious that Columbus didn't land on North America. The Spanish language is spoken in South America...

I'm wonder who was the first guy who land on North America... ??
I mean, who really started to colonize the land.
Solon_Poledourus
It was a lesser known character named Jimmy McPerson.
Back in the year 1985 bc(before cool), Jimmy McPerson had been fighting the oppressive forces of the Nazi Regime, which held most of Europe under control with something called Sharia Law. During the battle of Hastings, Jimmy led his fellow soldiers from the Tuskegee Experimental Air Division in a raid to kill the Nazi leader, Admiral Akbar.
The mission was a success, but Jimmy was wounded and had to have his arms and legs amputated. Back then, they had no anesthetics, so they put Jimmy into cryogenic sleep to perform the operation. When he awoke, he saw that he had been outfitted with robotic limbs. The cost of this operation was $6million dollars, and it bankrupted his home country of LeeMajorsland. He was exiled and forced to swim the Bering Straight to get to New Jersey, which is where he settled, thus populating North America.

I hope this helps, as I spent a good deal of time on the research.
deanhills
Solon_Poledourus wrote:
It was a lesser known character named Jimmy McPerson.
Back in the year 1985 bc(before cool), Jimmy McPerson had been fighting the oppressive forces of the Nazi Regime, which held most of Europe under control with something called Sharia Law. During the battle of Hastings, Jimmy led his fellow soldiers from the Tuskegee Experimental Air Division in a raid to kill the Nazi leader, Admiral Akbar.
The mission was a success, but Jimmy was wounded and had to have his arms and legs amputated. Back then, they had no anesthetics, so they put Jimmy into cryogenic sleep to perform the operation. When he awoke, he saw that he had been outfitted with robotic limbs. The cost of this operation was $6million dollars, and it bankrupted his home country of LeeMajorsland. He was exiled and forced to swim the Bering Straight to get to New Jersey, which is where he settled, thus populating North America.

I hope this helps, as I spent a good deal of time on the research.
Laughing Laughing Laughing History being re-written? I especially like the part about swimming to New Jersey via the Bering Straight!
BinahZ
Jerold H. Feinstein:
Quote:
On March 31, 1492 the Edict of Expulsion (also called the Alhambra Decree) was signed. Every Jew in Spain was forced to choose between conversion to Christianity or leaving the country forever without their possessions. 150,000 Jews left Spain, many first went to Portugal, and following expulsion to the Ottoman Empire. On July 31st (7th of Av), the last Jew left Spain according to some sources and August 2nd (9th of Av), according to others. Columbus sailed on August 3, 1492. He did insist, however, that all of his crew be on board August 2nd, which was the not only the day all Jews had to leave Spain but also the 9th of AV.

Columbus the man is shrouded in mystery, theory, and fable. What is know of the man is he left a legacy of both historical adventure and death and cruelty.
Many legends will forever outweigh any historical facts that can be documented.
Columbus employed peculiar dates and phrases unique to the Hebrew people. Instead of referring to the "destruction" or "fall of Jerusalem," he used the phrase "the destruction of the second house." He also employed the Hebrew calculation of 68 a.d. instead of 70 a.d. A note in a margin of his writings dated 1481 is immediately given its Hebrew equivalent of 5241, etc.
We will never know. But all the hypothesis can be fun and intriguing. Wink
ujjawall
Columbus discovered America: NOT! Columbus never really landed in America. He went to the Bahamas on his first trip and South America on some other trips.
ujjawall
The funny thing is, Columbus wasn't even a national hero until relatively recently. For about 300 years he was seen as nothing but an obscure historical figure who died in poverty amidst legal woes, until a book was written, making him out to be a hero. He sort of faded into history as a nobody until 1829 when Washington Irving wrote his own version(a mostly fictional account) of Columbus' life. The book became extremely popular, and was the biggest contributing factor to making Columbus a pop culture icon and national treasure. For almost 100 years, Irving's book was the main piece of literature for information on Columbus, and still influences the historical view of Columbus.

He was a thief, a slave trader, a marauder, a pirate, a murderer, a liar... the list goes on and on. One thing he was not, was a man worthy of the status given to him in history books. Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing
tazone
he discovered america while trying to find a new route to india

unknown fact: people already knew the world was round
have you ever seen a statue of Atlas with a flat earth on his shoulders
deanhills
ujjawall wrote:
He was a thief, a slave trader, a marauder, a pirate, a murderer, a liar... the list goes on and on. One thing he was not, was a man worthy of the status given to him in history books. Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing
I wonder how many of those historic figures there are who have been presented as hero figures and are anything but that? Smile
watersoul
deanhills wrote:
ujjawall wrote:
He was a thief, a slave trader, a marauder, a pirate, a murderer, a liar... the list goes on and on. One thing he was not, was a man worthy of the status given to him in history books. Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing
I wonder how many of those historic figures there are who have been presented as hero figures and are anything but that? Smile


Good point, and I guess it also depends on whose history books we read.
Mrs Lycos
Libby wrote:


He and his soldiers committed genocide against the native people in the Bahamas, enslaving and killing millions of people. All for some gold.



I really admire your ability for historical revision and impartiality. Millions?? genocide?? I can't believe you can be so ignorant and still try to "enlighten" other people. First learn about the REAL facts, if you find some of what you were tought was not true, bud do not INVENT or rewrite history just because you read something somewhere and repeat it like a parrot - even exaggerating - without giving it a single thought.

Do you think it can be possible that millions can live in the Bahamas islands, with an area of 5,358 sq mi?? At the time, at most 30,000 natives lived scattered in the islands.

Then you talk about genocide:
wikipedia wrote:
Genocide is defined as "the deliberate and systematic destruction, in whole or in part, of an ethnic, racial, religious, or national group"


Do you really believe that Columbus and his people killed the natives on purpose and systematically? just for fun? The facts are that a large part of the native population did die because of smallpox, but they did not bring that on purpose, like a "biological weapon".

So if you're posting your "opinions" without facts to support your words, and you present your opinions as supreme "truths", "enlighting" others here in the forum, -or you read them here and take them for granted because they're opposite to what they say is wrong-, then you're no different than those people you are critizicing so badly.
IceCreamTruck
Stranger than this is that there are land markers in the North that might be evidence of the Knights Templar claiming land in North Central America, and no this isn't a stupid Dan Brown novel fictitious fact. The finding does suggest that between the Vikings and Columbus that the actual USA was visited by the Knights Templar, they sailed into the great lakes, and down some river... I can't remember the name of the river, or the source, but I will find it for you guys.

I just wanted to know if anyone else is as interested in this as I am. Hey, it does mean they may have brought the "Holy Grail" with them, but if the "Holy Grail" was actually just mathematics and building knowledge that contributed to the architectural boom in Europe a few years after the reported discovery of the "Holy Grail" then there's really nothing to find in the US except some cool facts about this mysterious group of people. What I heard was that the stones mark the border of someone's land claim, and they have Templar symbols on them, and it predates Columbus. I think it basically sets up a good portion of the US as originally having belonged to, or having been claimed by, the Knights Templar.

This should be enough info for anyone to research it, however, so I'll encourage you to get your own facts as I have been really bad about supplying evidence or references here. I will attempt to make up for that.
Mrs Lycos
Solon_Poledourus wrote:

He was a thief, a slave trader, a marauder, a pirate, a murderer, a liar... the list goes on and on. One thing he was not, was a man worthy of the status given to him in history books.


Certainly can you provide facts and information to back up your whole list of accusations? It's very easy to say those bunch of things about someone, but then back up your words, don't just merely state your opinions.

What I can agree with you is that there are many with "lords" and "heroes" status, such as "lord" Drake, a reknown pirate, plunderer, marauder, murderer and liar, and there are lots of historical documents that show that openly.

And as it is certain that Vikings visited the American continent before Columbus, so did people from Indonesia and Asia, and the fact that is conmemorated is that Columbus set up the first wave of colonization and from that point on, America became known to the European civilization and the whole process began, with subsequent colonizations by the British, French and Portuguese apart from Spanish, which built the bases of what are now the Countries in America.

Whether you like it or not, it's thanks to Columbus that America is what it is - America The Continent, not the country. Others - British would be of your liking- would have gotten to the continent anyway at some point in History, but he was the first to start the colonization. And that is why he has that status given in History books.

And please don't be so obtuse to believe that the books say America for The United States of America, that is the name of a country only, but the Whole continent is called America. If people living in the United States like to call their country America, that's their problem, that is not a mistake in the books.
gandalfthegrey
Columbus did not discover America - people were already here.
(We seriously need to rename Columbus Day).

Columbus was not even the first European/first person from the Old World to come to America. Norse Viking Leif Ericson http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leif_Ericson was.

There is even evidence that supports other individuals and civilizations had contact with the New World. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pre-Columbian_trans-oceanic_contact
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