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Using a computer in the sun, under a lot of heat.





KHO
Here's my scenario. I have a client that wants to use his computer at his outdoor business, in the sun. his current monitor just isn't cutting it, and his PC itself is just way too slow. It's hard to read a monitor outdoors for those of you who haven't tried, it's near impossible to read anything. As a result, specialist companies manufacture $1300 monitors designed to do this. These monitors boast gaming PC capable specs on a monitor, this is a work machine, it needs about a 32bit display, anything beyond that is overkill. I don't need a resolution beyond 1024x768 really.

Now then, I actually need a whole computer set up here, and that's an interesting proposition, because the price range is about 1k. The temperature stretches as high as 125 F. down at the lake where his business is, and most frequently that's complimented by not a single cloud in the sky and the high altitude of New Mexico and our lovely mountain based state putting us dead smack underneath the sun. It gets brutal.

So here's my project and I hope that some Frihosters might be able to help me, get a computer for under $1100 that will perform well in the sun and in temperatures up to 130 F. And it should have at least 1000 nits of screen brightness and a contrast ratio greater than 5 to 1
Diablosblizz
Well, you could go high-tech and install a Liquid Cooling system. They work very well if you purchase a very good one. Next would be the size of the case. The bigger, the better. The bigger it is, the more heat can escape and it won't get any hotter. Fans and heatsinks are also mandatory. Basically, install a few CPU coolers (including liquid cooling) and install fans, heatsinks and liquid cooling around the PC itself. Because it's out in the sun it's obviously going to be a lot hotter so the more the better.

As for the monitor, that's going to be a big problem. I don't know anything to support you here.
psycosquirrel
Coming from someone who has actually done liquid cooling, avoid it at all costs. It is inconvenient, a money hole, and would not be helpful at all in this setting. Watercooled PCs work best when the temperature difference between the air and the watercooling loop is high. When the hardware heats the liquid to 120F and the ambient is 120F, you might as well go with aircooling.

Plus, you can't afford that in your budget.

Run a Core 2 Duo, and disable one of the cores to lower the thermal load. AVOID CORE 2 QUADS. They will overheat in this kind of heat.

You will definitely need an aftermarket cooler for the video card and CPU.

The system will only survive if it is in the shade too.


Long-story short, but a Panasonic Toughbook. You will be way overbudget, but nothing else will work adequately. Computers are simply not designed for high-heat environments.
Helios
psycosquirrel wrote:
Coming from someone who has actually done liquid cooling, avoid it at all costs. It is inconvenient, a money hole, and would not be helpful at all in this setting. Watercooled PCs work best when the temperature difference between the air and the watercooling loop is high. When the hardware heats the liquid to 120F and the ambient is 120F, you might as well go with aircooling.

Plus, you can't afford that in your budget.

Run a Core 2 Duo, and disable one of the cores to lower the thermal load. AVOID CORE 2 QUADS. They will overheat in this kind of heat.

You will definitely need an aftermarket cooler for the video card and CPU.

The system will only survive if it is in the shade too.


Long-story short, but a Panasonic Toughbook. You will be way overbudget, but nothing else will work adequately. Computers are simply not designed for high-heat environments.


Very correct. I'll just add that electronic components in general don't like high-heat environments Wink
ocalhoun
psycosquirrel wrote:


Long-story short, but a Panasonic Toughbook. You will be way overbudget, but nothing else will work adequately. Computers are simply not designed for high-heat environments.


Not if you get an older, used, refurbished one.

Also, you might consider for $1000...
Shade for computer: $200 Computer: $800
psycosquirrel
Ocalhoun proves a valid point... Build some sort of a structure for the computer to be in the shade all the time, and you can use just about any computer.

Is he leaning towards a desktop or a laptop approach to the problem?
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