FRIHOST FORUMS SEARCH FAQ TOS BLOGS COMPETITIONS
You are invited to Log in or Register a free Frihost Account!


Water Shortage





viraj
The monsoons this year although came earlier for relief but could not sustain.

So far it has rained scanty in all western ghats and now there are declarations from the Municipal Corporation that the water storage in lakes and other reservoirs is to sustain for 100 - 150 days.

This is very panic situation and already BMC (Bombay Municipal Corporation) has started the water cut off of 15%. So the water will come alternate days and soon thrice a week.

Now every one is dependent on rain god. They say only if it rains very heavy for about 10-15 days the situation can be overcome.

Dear nature, please do not delay us to please... rain heavily....
deanhills
Wishing that you will get rain soon Viraj. Must be pretty awful to only have water every now and then. I can imagine you must be filling every container with water when it becomes available?

Drought is certainly quite traumatic to go through. Very hard. South Africa suffers from drought quite often and this reminds me of an interesting story of the Rain Queen. Her subjects had faith in that she had magical powers to control the clouds and rain fall by her Kingdom (Wikipedia):

Quote:
The Modjadji or Rain Queen is the hereditary queen of Balobedu, the people of the Limpopo Province of South Africa. The succession to the position of Rain Queen is matrilineal, meaning that the Queen's eldest daughter is the heir, and that males are not entitled to inherit the throne at all. The Rain Queen is believed to have special powers, including the ability to control the clouds and rainfall.


More details at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rain_Queen
coolclay
I know how it is. We haven't had rain here on Catalina Island in California for about 2 months. Our water supplies are still holding up however. It must be rough not having at least drinking water. I will pray for rain for you.
rshanthakumar
Don't pray too much. You will have floods like last year!
ocalhoun
I know how that is. Back home in Florida, my area had water shortages, even though we had plenty of water sources. All the water was being sold from our county to Tampa and Miami though, so we had to do without in order to make the county's budget balance.
deanhills
I find it so amazing. Vancouver in Canada which has much more water than the Middle East. In the Middle East a small 500ml bottle of water costs 25 cents. In Vancouver it is 1.69 dollars, and depending where you purchase it, as the same brand can vary between 1.69 to 1.89, and that is excluding taxes, as there are taxes and levies payable on plastic water bottles. The other phenomenon that has baffled me is that petrol is much more expensive in Canada than in the States. How come? Canada has its own supplies and exports oil to the US.
Tom7
yeah, maybe it has something to do with climate change, because here, in australia, we have been having a drought for many years, and my local dam has been pumped to other cities (stealing our water, GRRR) and now my local dam is running low, but WE are the ones who have to live with the water restrictions, not the other cities. stupid council.
ptolomeo
Maybe taking out the salt from sea water is the solution to fresh water shortage.
everfine99
Quote:
As we in water-rich countries take our daily showers, water the lawn or laze about in the pool, it's easy to forget that fresh water is a life-or-death issue in many parts of the world.
Of a population of roughly 6.1 billion, more than 1 billion lack access to potable water. The World Health Organization says that at any time, up to half of humanity has one of the six main diseases -- diarrhea, schistosomiasis, or trachoma, or infestation with ascaris, guinea worm, or hookworm -- associated with poor drinking water and inadequate sanitation. About 5 million people die each year from poor drinking water, poor sanitation, or a dirty home environment -- often resulting from water shortage


Parched places
One glance at the map tells you that water is shortest in equatorial countries, often where populations are rising. (Population data below from Population Reference Bureau).



China, with 1.26 billion people, is "the one area worrying most people most of the time," says Marq de Villiers, author of the recently published "Water " (see bibliography). In dry Northern China, he says, "the water table is dropping one meter per year due to overpumping, and the Chinese admit that 300 cities are running short. They are diverting water from agriculture and farmers are going out of business." Some Chinese rivers are so polluted with heavy metals that they can't be used for irrigation, he adds.

"They're disgraceful, unusable, industrial sewers," says de Villiers. As farmers go out of business, China will have to import more food.

In India, home to 1.002 billion people, key aquifers are being overpumped, and the soil is growing saltier through contamination with irrigation water. Irrigation was a key to increasing food production in India during the green revolution, and as the population surges toward a projected 1.363 billion in 2025, its crops will continue to depend on clean water and clean soil.

Israel (population 6.2 million), invented many water-conserving technologies, but water withdrawals still exceed resupply. Overpumping of aquifers along the coast is allowing seawater to pollute drinking water. Like neighboring Jordan, Israel is largely dependent on the Jordan River for fresh water.



Source - http://whyfiles.org/131fresh_water/2.html
[MOD - quote tags and source added - Bikerman]
nisibdv
What a nice map of the post above. very interesting indeed. Very interesting how physical scarcity correlates with absence of rivers.
Jinx
Drove through northern California a few weeks back, and Lake Shasta, and the reservoir lake near Watsonville, CA (Can't recall the name of it) are both alarmingly low... nearly empty. A few days later I heard on a radio news broadcast that they may impose strict water rationing in California next year. This means less water for irrigation, which means less produce from the area which will mean higher prices on produce across the country.

I can't understand why they would wait until the water was almost gone to start rationing it, though. Too many people living in a desert = too much strain on local resources.

Lake Mead in the Las Vegas, NV area is in similar dire straights, and so is Lake Lanier, Atlanta, GA's main drinking water supply in the South East of the country.

America is headed for some serious hurt if we can't learn to conserve our resources.

We're getting too close to the situation of the 1930's with the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl for comfort.
rajpk
great problem for world in future
ocalhoun
Jinx wrote:
Drove through northern California a few weeks back, and Lake Shasta, and the reservoir lake near Watsonville, CA (Can't recall the name of it) are both alarmingly low... nearly empty. A few days later I heard on a radio news broadcast that they may impose strict water rationing in California next year. This means less water for irrigation, which means less produce from the area which will mean higher prices on produce across the country.

But mainly, it means your precious lawns and golf courses won't be that European ideal of green anymore. A LOT of water usage problems could be eliminated if people would just realize that having a 'perfect' lawn in the middle of what should be a desert is impractical.
Ophois
ocalhoun wrote:
But mainly, it means your precious lawns and golf courses won't be that European ideal of green anymore. A LOT of water usage problems could be eliminated if people would just realize that having a 'perfect' lawn in the middle of what should be a desert is impractical.
It's funny... When I was a kid in Arizona, we never had a lawn. My dad never saw a reason to waste water on grass in the desert. We always had gravel in our yard. Cactus and gravel.
ocalhoun
Ophois wrote:
ocalhoun wrote:
But mainly, it means your precious lawns and golf courses won't be that European ideal of green anymore. A LOT of water usage problems could be eliminated if people would just realize that having a 'perfect' lawn in the middle of what should be a desert is impractical.
It's funny... When I was a kid in Arizona, we never had a lawn. My dad never saw a reason to waste water on grass in the desert. We always had gravel in our yard. Cactus and gravel.

Which is what everyone who lives in places like that should do.
If you want a pretty lawn, move to a place where grass grows without extra watering.
codegeek
Water is a scarce commodity here in Kathmandu, especially clean drinking water. The distribution is not even, so some areas get more water from the water pipes in their home than others. In our area, the government allows us about 3 hours of water in about 5 days. Naturally, we fill up everything we have using a motor, and try to fill up the 500 liter tank, which we use for almost everything. When there is no water in the tank, it gets really difficult. Fortunately, the water supply has been regular(the same 3 hrs/5 days) for the past few months, so the tank hasn't become empty.

The main problem is that we don't get to use the motor when the water distribution time corresponds to the time for power cut. That's when we have to use the pump, and it's quite the physical labour. Hopefully, things will improve soon. Talks have been going on about bringing water from the Melamchi project into Kathmandu. When that is implemented, we will get water with more frequency, perhaps even daily.
ocalhoun
codegeek wrote:
Naturally, we fill up everything we have using a motor, and try to fill up the 500 liter tank, which we use for almost everything.

Reminds me of my old house in S. Dakota.

It was too remote for water hookup, and too high-altitude for a well.

I would drive a truck with a 300 gallon (about 1000 liter) water tank and make lots of trips to fill up my 1500 gallon (about 5000 liter) cistern, from which all my house's water came.
Luckily, with such large tanks and my frugal water usage, I didn't have to do that often.

...Which brings to mind though... 500 liters is quite small for a home supply. Only about 150 gallons.
Why not get a bigger tank so you'll be less likely to run out? Too expensive?
codegeek
Quote:
Why not get a bigger tank so you'll be less likely to run out? Too expensive?


At 3 hours of supply per 5 days and 2 families using the same tap, it's really difficult to completely fill up even the 500 liter tank. Hence, a bigger tank has not really become necessary for us. For times when there is excess water (which is extremely rare), we also have a 300 liter backup tank. It's not very often that we get to fill it up though.

However, the 500 liter tank hasn't become empty for a few months due to regular supply, so we really haven't had much shortage.
Related topics
watermelon
water
How do you keep your machine cool?
Dark Water Bad
Possible Overheating
Dark Water Bad
Toxic water after explosion of chemical factory
Wetenschapsvragen... wie durft?
How does water cooling works?
About the explosion next to London...
Drinking enough water?
The Great Oil+Grain+Food Crisis of the 21st Century
EMP Resistant Vehicles ?
Volunteers to go on Mars with no return
Reply to topic    Frihost Forum Index -> Science -> Earth

FRIHOST HOME | FAQ | TOS | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | SITE MAP
© 2005-2011 Frihost, forums powered by phpBB.