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teaching English overseas





geriav
I am thinking about teaching English overseas and was wondering about the best way to go about it – where to do it, whether to take private classes or apply to a school, whether to go alone or take a friend, how long I’d need to be away to feel like I’ve had an experience…Basically everything to do with what would be a horizon widening trip! I am fluent in French, German and Spanish (and have English as my native tongue) and so really do have a lot of choice. It would be my first time travelling away from home and so I’d like to stay in Europe for now; if it all goes wrong, I’m not too far away to come back! I have worked in one of the many escuelas de ingles en Inglaterra based in London teaching English to Spanish people. The experience went very well – I like their culture and found them all eager to learn – and so I am thinking I may start my travels in Spain, to find a city I’d like to settle in to work. I will be investing in one of the eurorail passes so I have some flexibility when looking for my future (albeit temporary) home. I’ll start in Madrid and listen to recommendations – I understand Salamanca and Valladolid are close and so they are likely to be on the visiting list. I’d also like to see Andalucia as I’ve heard the culture is very different there to what it is in the North. If anyone has done this before (or knows of any big Spanish university cities), please, let me know your recommendations!
WhistleTurning
Most oportunities will arrise from the less developed countries, especially those of excolonies of France and Spain. They are usually crying out for E F L teachers.
escritor
geriav wrote:
I’d also like to see Andalucia as I’ve heard the culture is very different there to what it is in the North.

They speak in a different (and harder to undestand) way too. Sad
meet in rio
I'm heading out to teach in Galicia (really hoping for Santiago de Compostela) this year with the British Council (I'm taking a year out in the middle of my degree), but with the experience you say you have, perhaps an assistantship would be starting a little low on the ladder.

All my friends who have gone out there in previous years say that it's insanely easy to get private classes running, especially (I was surprised to hear) in Madrid.

I've heard that Barcelona is fabulous, but perhaps the Catalan would screw things up for you? I hear that Salamanca is where they speak the 'purest' Castilian. To be honest, I'm quite looking forward to getting a Galician accent myself, even if it does mean filtering out any Gallego...
gabeos
has anyone taught in the JET program (in japan)? if so, what was your experience like? Was there a lot of involvement with other JET teachers? does the program administration maintain a presence the whole year?
henne831
I just graduated with my teaching degree and have been looking at a website for teaching jobs. I'll post a link and you can check it out. It looks like South Korea is a popular choice for teaching overseas and I think they need teachers. They make it sound like you can make like 2000 a month and get free living arrangements. The site is educationamerica.net . I'm not plugging the site but that could be somewhere to start.
mconnelly
I've taught english in Beijing before. The money is pretty good and the kids are nice as long as you're not teaching on friday night. TESL certificates are helpful, but not necessary. Same with university degrees. You can try to find a job before coming <thebeijigner.com> is good for that, or you can just show up and find one when you get here. Cheers.
deanhills
mconnelly wrote:
I've taught english in Beijing before. The money is pretty good and the kids are nice as long as you're not teaching on friday night. TESL certificates are helpful, but not necessary. Same with university degrees. You can try to find a job before coming <thebeijigner.com> is good for that, or you can just show up and find one when you get here. Cheers.


I am interested to know. If you do not have TESL, do you have other teaching qualifications or experience. When I was a student, I used to make extra money by teaching English and did it in a completely unstructured way. Working with what the people knew of English and then building on that with doing practical fun stuff, like visiting a market, etc. etc. followed by going through our experiences together in an informal way. It surprisingly was very effective and I ended up making many friends that way too. So if you would be in Beijing, would something like that work, or do you need to show them an outline of a programme and teach in a formal class room settings?
chi0
gabeos - I'm currently on the JET Programme. The programme exists mostly to get teachers to Japan, and it is paid for by the Japanese government (i.e. it's not a private company, and you follow the same working rules as any government employee).

The actual JET Programme has very little to do with your daily life. You work in the Japanese school system. In some situations, you will meet with other JET participants often, and in others, you'll be so far away from them that you'll never see them.

The only guaranteed time you'll see them is at Tokyo Orientation when you first arrive, and at mid-year conferences in your designated prefecture. It differs for every prefecture, but most of them have a JET support system in place. Every prefecture has a prefectural advisor, to whom you direct any big problems or questions you have.

So far, my experience has been a fantastic one. I'm going in to my third year here now and loving every minute of it. Very Happy

In response to the OP, if I were seriously considering English-teaching as a career, I'd do a certified TEFL course. You're much more likely to get a job if you have one of those. There are quite a few programmes out there, though, (like the JET Programme mentioned above) that accepts applicants with only university degrees.
johnsuth
chi0 wrote:
gabeos - I'm currently on the JET Programme. The programme exists mostly to get teachers to Japan, and it is paid for by the Japanese government (i.e. it's not a private company, and you follow the same working rules as any government employee).

The actual JET Programme has very little to do with your daily life. You work in the Japanese school system. In some situations, you will meet with other JET participants often, and in others, you'll be so far away from them that you'll never see them.

The only guaranteed time you'll see them is at Tokyo Orientation when you first arrive, and at mid-year conferences in your designated prefecture. It differs for every prefecture, but most of them have a JET support system in place. Every prefecture has a prefectural advisor, to whom you direct any big problems or questions you have.

So far, my experience has been a fantastic one. I'm going in to my third year here now and loving every minute of it. Very Happy

In response to the OP, if I were seriously considering English-teaching as a career, I'd do a certified TEFL course. You're much more likely to get a job if you have one of those. There are quite a few programmes out there, though, (like the JET Programme mentioned above) that accepts applicants with only university degrees.


Just about every program/organization I've researched will accept a bachelors degree in the absence of any teaching qualifications. In my experience experience, at least, in the beginning is preferable to specific education and if you are seriously considering teaching a langauge your best course of action would be to actually get a job teaching. In response to the first post, if your teaching english Asia is probably your best bet, both in terms of salary and availability; Japan, South Korea and Taiwan specifically. I've heard horror stories from China though, something due to the centralized nature of their education system.
thejam
I know quite some overseas people come over here to teach English (Shanghai). Payment is about 1500$ a month, but the expenses like rent and food is not too high out here. I haven't heard about horror stories, but on the other hand i wouldn't be surprized...
phal
Good day Geriav,
Teaching English abroad is a interesting and exciting experience. Especially if you travel on the certain place with the present of 'Cruceros Baltico' this is really a greatest experience ever! Just like my cousin she went on an internship abroad Italy, for a way longer stay. She went to Florence for around 5 months, to build up some work experience. Because she always wanted to improve her Spanish after she finished her studies and decided to work in one of those 'hoteles en Segovia', in Spain. When she came back, she told me how great to study and work abroad.
atul2242
My friends, a couple are teaching English in Korea and loving every day of it.
r4inm4ker
Teaching English in Taiwan is also a good option. Overall the environment here is nice, public security is good, and there are more than enough people who are willing to help foreigners. You may go to http://www.forumosa.com/taiwan/ for more information.
westcp
Two of my friends went over to teach in taiwan and loved it.

They both moved on after their contracts, but one crrent in ireland wants to go back with his wife.

So it must be good.

Maybe a learning curve for the Culture. But the money is normaly paid in US$. so all good their if the currency is high.

Normally u need to do an International Enlgish Teaching Test (check google for that). Thats the main thing u can do. Dont know about other subjects.

You would have to fork out the airfare. but they cover your appartment / rental as far as I know.

Good adventure if you're young.

Old folks like me have no hope of doing that...

Good luck if u go!
davidfromoz
Its been some years now, but I taught English in Taiwan in the 90s. I think Taiwan, China, Japan and Korea are excellent places to go and teach English, though I'm sure there are more. At least for Taiwan and quick web will reveal a ton of jobs that you could apply for from home, though I'm pretty sure you could arrive there and find one.

I went there unqualified and without a degree and got a job on my first day. Pay was enough for me to get a decent place to live (simple), eat well, save enough for a holiday each year and put a small amount away. The work was fun and interesting. The Taiwanese people are really wonderful and its easy to make friends.

Once you're there its easy to find work doing other things if you don't enjoy teaching. Some people travel around Asia and return to Taiwan when they run out of money. Some people teach for the long term and even move into management roles. Some people do it for a few years of experience before going home for a serious job (frequently seriously studying Chinese while they are there). I switched to corporate work, traveled to other countries and still haven't moved home yet.

I'd recommend this for any young person. Do it before you get established, because the longer you leave it the more roots you will have put down and the more reasons you will have to not go. Many will find it hard to finally make the decision to do it, even though they are intrigued. Do it, for many its a life changing experience.

cheers,
david
Chinmoy
overseas teaching is a really lucrative option. It is too much of a challenge with a different acent but you enjoy it more..
yuxuan
Chinese university maybe a good choice,here you can get high paid,with woking about three or four hours a day. the price in china is much low.but you have to get used to the life
deanhills
yuxuan wrote:
Chinese university maybe a good choice,here you can get high paid,with woking about three or four hours a day. the price in china is much low.but you have to get used to the life


Which University would it be, and in which city Yuxuan?
jinnixue
dear geriav:

do you want teaching English be your major job or just a part time job? if the first, you should visit some universities in non-English country, there are many positions, especially in western China. if the 2nd, you can use Skype, where you can find many people want to improve their English listening and speaking, and maybe you can also learn another language.
poppat
My sister-in law is teaching in South Korea. She does not speak Korean, but is doing just fine. She has been there on and off for about 4 years and has worked her way up to University level, where the big bucks is.

It all depends on what you want out of the experience.

I am thinking of learning Russian and teaching English over there.

poppat
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