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Lost Hard Drive Capacity





dickyzin
I have a 320 Gigabyte Seagate Hard Disk drive which I have put in an enclosure to use as an external drive. Just recently I noticed that I had lost one directory with about 20Gb of data. When I checked the properties of the Drive, the capacity had dropped to 300 GB. I would like help in trying to restore my lost data and to restore the capacity of my drive back to 320GB.
djclue917
Hmmm... that's weird. Do you remember doing anything that might have caused that directory to disappear?
CTMiB
A hard drive never has the full advertised amount of space listed on it. For a more detailed explanation, check out the following article:

http://www.acronis.com/enterprise/resource/tips-tricks/2004/missing-megabytes.html
ftv_flung
An easy way to find out the true capacity of a hard drive (compared to the advertised amount)

is to find 93% of their advertised amount - and that is roughly what you'll get!

my 250gb external hard drive has 232gb.... I don't know why they do it
dickyzin
I know that hard drives don't the exact capacity on the label but in my case, it dropped down by 20Gb. That missing 20Gb was there before and I've had this hard drive for more than 1 year. Can anyone tell me how to get this back without formatting the drive since I don't want to lose the data.
Jaan
it's cause they use a different definition of gigabytes than microsoft, so under your computer it appears you lost data, but depending on your definition you still had 320gb. and losing a directory?? thats rediculous!!! next time back up all your data!
[FuN]goku
Hmm, i think i've heard of this from a friend at school... Eruhm..... He said he was having hardrive failure, and his files started disappearing... of course, hes not that computer smart so he didnt check the capacity so im not sure if that changed on his hd or not. But eventually it crapped out on him..

So anyways, i doubt that would happen if your hardrive is fairly new.

However, there may be 2 solutions for you..

I've seen alot of software which aids you in recovering your data.. I've 'HEARD' of data being restored after being gone for over a year.. thats just what i 'HEARD' it could be false.. and i heard it was on a mac as well.. Erm but there is some windows recovery tools, which you should probably look into.. i dont know the names of any off hand but it's certainly worth googling.

Now, uh i think places around where i live... well places 2 hours away from me, do hardrive recovery for you. Er, i think i heard future shop does stuff like that.. I'm not sure.. or maybe even Staples.. im not sure, but you could try to look around at some PC shops and see if they do that sort of thing. Or, if you've bought your pc from a retailer.. you could try sending it back to them. i think they might.

Anyways i hope some of this will help you some how :/ good luck in recovering your files mate.

But i do agree with Jaan, you should back up your data, or at least important things which you might use on a daily basis... i know i'm a bit err screwed right now.. Recently my laptop's bios has messed up and my pc wont boot, called dell and the asked me to try some things.. and no luck.. so i gotta send it in.. so i gotta do without all my good coding stuff until i get it back.. but oh well.
Jaan
Read this, really helpful
http://www.lifehack.org/articles/technology/how-to-tell-when-your-hard-drive-is-going-to-fail.html
Seems like you want to act fast, listen for noises, and most importantly back up any data you don't want to lose.
Good luck, act fast, think with reason and logic above all. Good luck battling the demons of evil hard drives.
kansloos
You should check your partitions on the drive, see if there is any unallocated space.
This can be done with Windows own tool (god knows where to find it though) or Partition Magic and alike
MeddlingMonk
Hmm... directories mysteriously disappearing? It sounds like the drive is failing. I've never had a drive mysteriously change capacity, though. Have you recently installed a program or changed a setting that could alter the way the OS determines drive capacity (instead of counting using 10^3 bytes for KB, 10^6 bytes for MB, 10^9 bytes for GB, which is how most advertising counts, to the 2^10 system, which is how Windows usually counts - 1 GB = 1024 MB, 1 MB = 1024 KB, etc.).

If your drive is failing and you have lost a directory, you could try using a program like Restoration to undelete the data (if the drive isn't too badly damaged) or, unfortunately, deem it lost and backup everything ASAP. A program like HD Tune can run a surface scan of the drive to determine if it is damaged or failing. It can be downloaded here: www.hdtune.com/download.html.
mrcblake
dickyzin wrote:
I have a 320 Gigabyte Seagate Hard Disk drive which I have put in an enclosure to use as an external drive. Just recently I noticed that I had lost one directory with about 20Gb of data. When I checked the properties of the Drive, the capacity had dropped to 300 GB. I would like help in trying to restore my lost data and to restore the capacity of my drive back to 320GB.


You may need to update your bios. However I can't tell you too much because you have not told me anything about your computer. I don't know what kind of motherboard you have or the bios manufactuer or bios version. Rolling Eyes
djclue917
dickyzin wrote:
I know that hard drives don't the exact capacity on the label but in my case, it dropped down by 20Gb. That missing 20Gb was there before and I've had this hard drive for more than 1 year. Can anyone tell me how to get this back without formatting the drive since I don't want to lose the data.


Bad sectors, probably?
djclue917
ftv_flung wrote:
An easy way to find out the true capacity of a hard drive (compared to the advertised amount)

is to find 93% of their advertised amount - and that is roughly what you'll get!

my 250gb external hard drive has 232gb.... I don't know why they do it


Actually, that's not it. The main cause of the discrepancy is that the hard drive manufacturers use 1 kB = 1,000 Bytes, 1 MB = 1,000,000 Bytes, 1 GB = 1,000,000,000 Bytes, and so on. On the other hand, the software world uses multiples of 2, essentially, all capacities are represented as 2^x where x is some exponent. So, their representation becomes 1 kB = 2^10 (1024) Bytes, 1 MB = 2^20 Bytes, 1 GB = 2^30 Bytes, and so on.

With these in mind, one can easily convert from one representation to another. This is basically what you would want to do if you want to know the true capacity of your drive as far as your OS or any other software is concerned.

For example, a 320 GB drive is actually 320 x 10^9 Bytes which is equal to 320 x (10^9 / 2^30) Bytes, which is approximately equal to 298 GB.

In the case of a 250 GB drive: 250 x (10^9 / 2^30) = 232.8 GB. Which is basically about 93% of the advertised storage. This 93% isn't constant because the discrepancy increases as the units involved becomes larger: kB (97.66%) -> MB (95.37%) -> GB (93.13%).
ServalM
Try using GetDataBack from runtime, pretty good software and helped me a lot in the past!
Just make sure you have the correct version! There are two: the NTFS one and the FAT one. Most of the time you'll be using NTFS, but to be sure, just check it out by checking your HDD in your windows.
internetjobs
did you try formatting with harddisk tools?
omantye
Some people really become confused when they make the folder hidden and when the come back, the configuration in the computer my be not to show hidden files and you they may not see the directory. Try to search hidden file and folders and system folders also(some viruses make them system folders). If the problem still occurs, use chkdsk(if you are using windows or DOS) or scandisk with f parameter. like "chkdsk c: /f". That should solve the problem if it is solveable. Else search for disk recovery softwares in the web and try to fix it with them. And, one thing, search using the windows search once. I once locked my folder with folder locker and lost the password. But the search found it's contents for me! Smile
dickyzin
I heard SpinRite 6.0 by Gibson Research Corporation is a good disk recovery tool. It claims to be the best in its field and that no other utility has ever matched SpinRite. Their website is http://www.grc.com.
kurd4lyfe
Hi my name is Nabard I have recently bought an External Hard Drive and I accidentally Formated it. Before I Formated it, it had 1TB of space and after it was Formated it says you have 429 GB, please how do i unformat it to the first day or back to normal?
I used Compuapps Swissknife v3 to format it to FAT32 and after i formated it it told me that i have a capacity of 429 gb. Is there a way to do a roll back
the hard drive is a (Comstar platinum 3.5" 1TB external hard drive with one touch backup)
WebID: 10114452
Mfr. Part Number: CO-EXOT-1TBGM
Data Buffer 8MB
Maximum Data Transfer Rate 480Mbps
ftv_flung
djclue917 wrote:
ftv_flung wrote:
An easy way to find out the true capacity of a hard drive (compared to the advertised amount)

is to find 93% of their advertised amount - and that is roughly what you'll get!

my 250gb external hard drive has 232gb.... I don't know why they do it


Actually, that's not it. The main cause of the discrepancy is that the hard drive manufacturers use 1 kB = 1,000 Bytes, 1 MB = 1,000,000 Bytes, 1 GB = 1,000,000,000 Bytes, and so on. On the other hand, the software world uses multiples of 2, essentially, all capacities are represented as 2^x where x is some exponent. So, their representation becomes 1 kB = 2^10 (1024) Bytes, 1 MB = 2^20 Bytes, 1 GB = 2^30 Bytes, and so on.

With these in mind, one can easily convert from one representation to another. This is basically what you would want to do if you want to know the true capacity of your drive as far as your OS or any other software is concerned.

For example, a 320 GB drive is actually 320 x 10^9 Bytes which is equal to 320 x (10^9 / 2^30) Bytes, which is approximately equal to 298 GB.

In the case of a 250 GB drive: 250 x (10^9 / 2^30) = 232.8 GB. Which is basically about 93% of the advertised storage. This 93% isn't constant because the discrepancy increases as the units involved becomes larger: kB (97.66%) -> MB (95.37%) -> GB (93.13%).


Ok - thanks for correcting me on that one. That's quite interesting!! Very Happy

It's still kind of frustrating how the software world and manufacturer's world can't merge or at least use the same formulae :S
Kaseas
Open up disk management, and see if it shows up on that hard drive there.
coreymanshack
Download a bootable version of Gparted. Gparted is a partitioning program that runs on a linux based system. There are many versions out there avialable for download.
dickyzin
I ran some disk tools such as defragler to check the files in a particular fragmented cluster and found there is a file called Bad Cluster. I also ran some disk recovery tools and it showed that there are unrecoverable data in a cluster. So I assume that the lost of disk capacity could be due to the bad cluster. Can a bad cluster cause hard drive capacity to drop? So now here's the question. How can I fix or repair bad clusters/sectors on a hard drive. I've used chkdsk /F /R but to no avail.
coreymanshack
dickyzin wrote:
I ran some disk tools such as defragler to check the files in a particular fragmented cluster and found there is a file called Bad Cluster. I also ran some disk recovery tools and it showed that there are unrecoverable data in a cluster. So I assume that the lost of disk capacity could be due to the bad cluster. Can a bad cluster cause hard drive capacity to drop? So now here's the question. How can I fix or repair bad clusters/sectors on a hard drive. I've used chkdsk /F /R but to no avail.


If chkdsk didn't do it, your drive is going bad.
I was reading on how hard disk drives are recovered, they take the platters out, and stick them in an exact chasis of the model it was taken out of, after cleaning the platters with a special cleaner that is propietary.

This is all done in a clean room.
If your data was that important you might want to hire a company that specializes in this.
dickyzin
My data isn't that important. I didn't know how effective chkdsk is. Is there anything better than chkdsk?
coreymanshack
dickyzin wrote:
My data isn't that important. I didn't know how effective chkdsk is. Is there anything better than chkdsk?


Like I said, your disk is trash, buy a new disk.
saratdear
dickyzin wrote:
My data isn't that important. I didn't know how effective chkdsk is. Is there anything better than chkdsk?


Try HD Tune or ADRC Hard Disk Checker. Both are free, and have error scans. HD Tune also has a lot of other tools, like benchmarking, S.M.A.R.T values reading, etc.
Jamestf347
Hmm, i think i've heard of this from a friend at school... Eruhm..... He said he was having hardrive failure, and his files started disappearing... of course, hes not that computer smart so he didnt check the capacity so im not sure if that changed on his hd or not. But eventually it crapped out on him..

So anyways, i doubt that would happen if your hardrive is fairly new.

However, there may be 2 solutions for you..

I've seen alot of software which aids you in recovering your data.. I've 'HEARD' of data being restored after being gone for over a year.. thats just what i 'HEARD' it could be false.. and i heard it was on a mac as well.. Erm but there is some windows recovery tools, which you should probably look into.. i dont know the names of any off hand but it's certainly worth googling.

Now, uh i think places around where i live... well places 2 hours away from me, do hardrive recovery for you. Er, i think i heard future shop does stuff like that.. I'm not sure.. or maybe even Staples.. im not sure, but you could try to look around at some PC shops and see if they do that sort of thing. Or, if you've bought your pc from a retailer.. you could try sending it back to them. i think they might.

Anyways i hope some of this will help you some how :/ good luck in recovering your files mate.

But i do agree with Jaan, you should back up your data, or at least important things which you might use on a daily basis... i know i'm a bit err screwed right now.. Recently my laptop's bios has messed up and my pc wont boot, called dell and the asked me to try some things.. and no luck.. so i gotta send it in.. so i gotta do without all my good coding stuff until i get it back.. but oh well.

There may certainly be more than 2 solutions, one of being just format it. If that doesn't work check out partitions... you may also just remember that they are never fully commercial size as advertised. I know quiet a few hard-drives that have configuration files ect. with bigger than 20 GB
deanhills
I found the following blog with a variety of possible answers to the problem:
Quote:
Your Operating System does not support LBA48 addressing mode
1. You are mixing binary and decimal gigabytes
2. Your motherboard has created a hidden area on your hard drive to store a backup of the BIOS binaries
3. Your PC/Laptop manufacturer has created a hidden area on your hard drive to store a backup of the Operating System installation files (needed for automatic restore functionality)
4. You have used some software that sets HPA (Host Protected Area), messes with DCO (Device Configuration Overlay), or switches off LBA48 support
5. You have misplaced a jumper on the drive
6. There was Magic involved

Now I will go through these things one-by-one and provide some more details.


Try and read the discussion that follows the article, as people with problems applied a variety of solutions that helped them. This problem started in 2007, but the discussion and solutions go right down to 2009 and current. One of solutions may apply to your problems.
MarzEz
kurd4lyfe, you could try formatting your external harddrive with NTFS, as FAT32 may not support HDDs larger than 512mb.

Dickyzin, my friend had a similar problem. a hard drive is made up of many seperate magnetic disks, and i think that one of these has failed in your hard drive. the other disks should still work fine, but you need to be careful with the computer. i reccomend getting a new computer.
dickyzin
If I get a new hard disk drive and clone my failing hard disk drive onto it, will it still have corrupted data on it?
coreymanshack
dickyzin wrote:
If I get a new hard disk drive and clone my failing hard disk drive onto it, will it still have corrupted data on it?


Yes. If you clone corrupted data, you will get corrupted data back.
ForceRun
You have to decide what you data is worth to you. If it is just your old system drive with no personal data just trAsh the busted drive and buy a new one as hard drivers are supper cheap right now. If you have data that you really need, and have no other backup there are two steps. First off buy spinrite it is expensive $89. But works mericals as long as the drives hardware is in okay shape. If that doesn't work then your hard drive has hardware damage and you will have to use a data recovery center which will cost you $1,500+ at least.

End of the story backup!
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