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Hurricane POUNDS Big Easy





n0obie4life
Hurricane pounds Big Easy

New Orleans takes a hit, 1 million flee, oil prices soar

Tuesday August 30, 2005

NEW ORLEANS They feared the worst and their fears appear to be coming true.

As the US Gulf Coast was hit by Hurricane Katrina's 240 km per hour winds late last night, crude prices soared, the US stock market was being tossed up and down and the power supply to New Orleans was knocked out all this before the human cost was even assessed.

At press time, the authorities were hoping that the storm would be less potent than they had first feared. Even so, it was capable of claiming scores of lives and crippling the economy.

As a much weaker storm last week, Katrina had killed seven people in Florida. Since then, it has gathered speed, as it headed towards the Gulf Coast, officials braced for a disaster.

In an unprecedented exodus, more than 1 million of the 1.3 million population of the area around New Orleans the city known as the Big Easy was evacuated within hours.

Mayor Ray Nagin warned that the hurricane's storm surge of up to 8.5 million could topple the levees protecting the city and flood its historic French quarter.

"Ladies and gentlemen. I wish we had better news for you but we are facing the storm that most of us had feared. This is a threat we have never faced before," said Mr Nagin as he issued the compulsory evacuation order.

Some 10,000 people, unable or unwilling to flee, piled into the Louisiana Superdome, New Orleans' enclosed sports stadium.

The storm immediately tested the strength of their sanctuary as it blew away two parts of the stadium's roof. Rain started pouring into the stadium from these gaps though, at press time, the authorities were stressing that there was no danger to those huddled inside. Louisiana Governor Kathleen Blanco said that an engineer had checked the dome and found it sound.

America's oil and refinery operations, centred around the area, were hit even before the storm took dead aim at them.

Oil companies evacuated workers and shut down more than 600,000 barrels of daily production in the area. Refiners closed down more than one million barrels of refining output and that amount could rise even further.

This drove oil prices past the US$70 per barrel mark breaching a psychological barrier and threatening to severely hurt business activity. To ease fears of a meltdown, the US government indicated its readiness to tap into its emergency oil stockpile.

Insurance companies were preparing for the worst. The area in the path of the storm has more than US$150 billion ($251 billion) worth of insured property and those who fled the city did not expect to find their homes intact when they returned.

Within minutes of the storm's arrival, eerie scenes were being played out. CNN reported that winds were howling through downtown New Orleans, known for its popular Mardi Gras parade, ripping away chunks of debris.

And from Gulfport, Mississippi, the news channel reported the streets were submerged under two metres of water. "We are watching these buildings deteriorate and break down before our eyes," said its correspondent.

Earlier, US President George W Bush declared a state of emergency that clears the way for federal aid to affected areas.

"We cannot stress enough the dangers this hurricane poses to Gulf Coast communities," Mr Bush said from his Texas ranch.

Heeding his warning, the city started to empty out at a rate of 18,000 cars an hour.

The town's residents will count the cost of the hurricane only after it blows over.

"New Orleans may never be the same again," warned National Hurricane Centre director Max Mayfield. Agencies[/quoet]

http://todayonline.com.sg

Well. Here goes the price of OIL again Smile.
wistom
oh, the Hurricane really very harmful.
Will
i've heard it's killed 55. and to think that i was there just last week. very close, very close indeed. anyone got any relatives out there?
damj
Will,

I was i New Orleans for 2 days in April, and fell in love with that city. We also spent 5 days in Biloxi.

It may be years before life gets back to normal.
Gamerevolution
Yeah the Hurricane looks kinda biug.. i have a friend that lives there, i hope nothing will happen there Sad
Yac
I hope that many other lands will be mobilised as for the tsunami, to help the victims of kathrina.
God bless and strenghte you out there people.
Keep on hoping,
Things like that may happen
but we are just happy that you survive it, and
pray that you get all the support for a new start


yac from Germany
_________________
frozenecko
Sad I think its just terrible. I've been watching the updates and there are people that couldnt evacuate and now they are stuck on the streets with children and pets and babies and are now and day 5 without proper food and water. No formula for infants... its just horrible.
ddukki
People aren't just dying, some are killing. There are snipers shooting innocents and some looters who are armed and robbing flooded stores and hospitals for food. It's anarchy over there. Some have come into Dallas for refuge, staying in the Reunion Tower and our local hospital. It's horrible.
Billy Hill
ddukki wrote:
People aren't just dying, some are killing. There are snipers shooting innocents and some looters who are armed and robbing flooded stores and hospitals for food. It's anarchy over there. Some have come into Dallas for refuge, staying in the Reunion Tower and our local hospital. It's horrible.


Yeah, these people are actually shooting at the very people that are trying to help them?!?!

I can understand looting for food/water/diapers etc, as there is little help there, but TV's ?? Entire displays?

What the hell? Embarassed
frozenecko
... omigoodness... thats so sad..
noliver
HMMMM, seems some people are allowed to cut and PASTE - but others get shouted at !

Discrimination !

Laughing Laughing


n0obie4life wrote:
Hurricane pounds Big Easy

New Orleans takes a hit, 1 million flee, oil prices soar

Tuesday August 30, 2005

NEW ORLEANS They feared the worst and their fears appear to be coming true.

As the US Gulf Coast was hit by Hurricane Katrina's 240 km per hour winds late last night, crude prices soared, the US stock market was being tossed up and down and the power supply to New Orleans was knocked out all this before the human cost was even assessed.

At press time, the authorities were hoping that the storm would be less potent than they had first feared. Even so, it was capable of claiming scores of lives and crippling the economy.

As a much weaker storm last week, Katrina had killed seven people in Florida. Since then, it has gathered speed, as it headed towards the Gulf Coast, officials braced for a disaster.

In an unprecedented exodus, more than 1 million of the 1.3 million population of the area around New Orleans the city known as the Big Easy was evacuated within hours.

Mayor Ray Nagin warned that the hurricane's storm surge of up to 8.5 million could topple the levees protecting the city and flood its historic French quarter.

"Ladies and gentlemen. I wish we had better news for you but we are facing the storm that most of us had feared. This is a threat we have never faced before," said Mr Nagin as he issued the compulsory evacuation order.

Some 10,000 people, unable or unwilling to flee, piled into the Louisiana Superdome, New Orleans' enclosed sports stadium.

The storm immediately tested the strength of their sanctuary as it blew away two parts of the stadium's roof. Rain started pouring into the stadium from these gaps though, at press time, the authorities were stressing that there was no danger to those huddled inside. Louisiana Governor Kathleen Blanco said that an engineer had checked the dome and found it sound.

America's oil and refinery operations, centred around the area, were hit even before the storm took dead aim at them.

Oil companies evacuated workers and shut down more than 600,000 barrels of daily production in the area. Refiners closed down more than one million barrels of refining output and that amount could rise even further.

This drove oil prices past the US$70 per barrel mark breaching a psychological barrier and threatening to severely hurt business activity. To ease fears of a meltdown, the US government indicated its readiness to tap into its emergency oil stockpile.

Insurance companies were preparing for the worst. The area in the path of the storm has more than US$150 billion ($251 billion) worth of insured property and those who fled the city did not expect to find their homes intact when they returned.

Within minutes of the storm's arrival, eerie scenes were being played out. CNN reported that winds were howling through downtown New Orleans, known for its popular Mardi Gras parade, ripping away chunks of debris.

And from Gulfport, Mississippi, the news channel reported the streets were submerged under two metres of water. "We are watching these buildings deteriorate and break down before our eyes," said its correspondent.

Earlier, US President George W Bush declared a state of emergency that clears the way for federal aid to affected areas.

"We cannot stress enough the dangers this hurricane poses to Gulf Coast communities," Mr Bush said from his Texas ranch.

Heeding his warning, the city started to empty out at a rate of 18,000 cars an hour.

The town's residents will count the cost of the hurricane only after it blows over.

"New Orleans may never be the same again," warned National Hurricane Centre director Max Mayfield. Agencies[/quoet]

http://todayonline.com.sg

Well. Here goes the price of OIL again Smile.
hedgehog2
Why was New Orleans put there in the first place. If it is below sea level then dont build there. Even now, when the city is pretty much non-existant, they want to rebuild. What idiot would rebuild a city that has just been ruined by a level 4 hurricaine, and who knows what will hapen if a level 5 comes along. Rebuild New Orleans somewhere else. Let go of all of the memories, people need to move on sometime. Thanks for listenings
Billy Hill
hedgehog2 wrote:
Why was New Orleans put there in the first place. If it is below sea level then dont build there. Even now, when the city is pretty much non-existant, they want to rebuild. What idiot would rebuild a city that has just been ruined by a level 4 hurricaine, and who knows what will hapen if a level 5 comes along. Rebuild New Orleans somewhere else. Let go of all of the memories, people need to move on sometime. Thanks for listenings


While I agree that they should NOT build there again, (city wise), that is THE most important port for the US, and is very important for Canada as well. It will be rebuilt. They CAN make it safer... but WILL they?
hedgehog2
Maybe they should just build a port there. Its too late now. Anyways, just a port would be good, because then if a level 5 does come it wont ruin a bunch of peoples lives again. Thanks for pointing out my errors.

Honestly i am not being sarcastic
damj
They should selectively re-build, not just replace what was there. They should really consider what the city needs in the future and re-build that. Many of the low lying areas should not be rebuilt.

Keep in mind, that the entire city was not destroyed, and for most tall buildings, the damage is limited to the first couple floors.
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