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New computer slower than old one??!!





civtecd16
I just did a speed test on both of my computers. My old computer with the ethernet cable runs about 11mb/s. My new computer is wireless getting a signal form the old one, and it runs about 7mb/s. How can this be? I always thaught you dont lose connection speed over a wireless network. Could down/uploading torrents be slowing my new one down? Any response is appricieated.

New comp specs:
Dell XPS 420
Intel 6600 Quad core
3gb ram
wireless G pci card (internal)
Windows Vista OS

Old comp specs:
Dell Inspiron 2400
Intel Pentium 4
2gb ram
Ethernet cable
Windows XP SP2
bloodrider
I suppose you're referring to your Internet connection velocity.
You don't loose connection speed via wireless, unless the connection it's bad and you're losing signal...
Probably you've some running process on your old computer consuming your bandwidth.
If you're using Windows, you can disable "windows reserved bandwidth" (run "gpedit.msc" and then go to [Computer configuration --> Administrative templates --> Network --> QoS packet Scheduler]and enable "Limit reservable bandwidth"), that will save you 20% of your bandwidth Exclamation
civtecd16
Should I do this on both computers Question
Jaan
Also make sure your ports are forwarded (portforward.com) if you're using BT.
And if you can, try to use a wired ethernet cable (get a long one off ebay or drill a hole through your floor).

Maybe it's your ISP.
civtecd16
I tried the port forwarding. I must have did something wrong though as it still says my port is not fowarded well. I do have another ethernet cable that can reach the wall, but where would I hook up the splitter? Before or after the modem?
bloodrider
civtecd16 wrote:
Should I do this on both computers Question

Yes, you should do that on both.


civtecd16 wrote:
I tried the port forwarding. I must have did something wrong though as it still says my port is not forwarded well.

Did you checked your firewall/antivirus software Question It may be blocking, for example if you have a firewall set in "automatic mode" it'll probably block unrecognized software, to solve this you'll have to create rules or switch to "interactive mode".


civtecd16 wrote:
...but where would I hook up the splitter? Before or after the modem?

I don't understand this question. Don't you have everything connected to a router?
jwellsy
Check out this video on speeding up firefox.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGYggczgyo8
Jaan
You would connect the ethernet cable to your router, which comes after the modem. That is unless you have only one box, then just connect there.

So you're having troubles with torrents? Then a much better place to get help would be the uTorrent forums. Very helpful people there.
http://forum.utorrent.com/viewforum.php?id=11

If you don't want to give some more details about your modem/router config and make models (just look on the box and give the numbers and name).

If you're using Vista, it's quite bloated so you need to disable the firewall (if you have a router you won't need it anyways).

I'll do my best.

Cheers.
cvkien
in my mind, i would think wire and wireless are totally different things. and for sure, wireless will slower than the wire. the signal strength, the resistor will make wireless signal weak and that makes your connection slow. plus you get the connection from the old one, then for sure the new one will slow because your new computer is taking the connection from other computer, so the old computer will divide some of it connection to the new one. and so, it become slow.

even you connect the wireless trough a wireless router, some of the router have same speed but most of it is different between the lan and wlan speed. and cable signal loss is not much as the wireless.
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