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High Speed Cable vs. DSL





Tony The Tiger
What is the difference between High Speed Cable and DSL?
Tony The Tiger
How does wifi compare to the above options?
fadirocks
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DSL
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cable
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wifi

All depends on the provider, so these speeds can totally vary!!!!
for example RCN offers different packages
http://www.rcn.com/internet/highspeed/index.php

then Comcast, verizon, WOW, AOL & ATT offers something else
Tony The Tiger
My local AT&T service has gotten to over $40 per month with new taxes and service charges and I only use it to log on for 10 hours of free dial up and to make a few local and 800# calls. I have decided to pay $10 more a month for my cell phone jumping from an old $29/month 250-minute plan to a $39/month 450-minute plan with free mobile-to-mobile and rollover. I am going to close out my land line and get DSL or cable. I will then call mom over the internet with Windows live messenger and call a few other friends in a similar manner.

As I understand it my choices are DSL with my areas local phone company (AT&T) and high speed cable with my condos cable company (Comcast). I am going to go with AT&T's $24.99/month plan (http://www.att.com/gen/general?pid=6431 ) because I can get the AT&T wifi network which includes McDonald's and Barnes & Nobles (although it seems to be only the Barnes & Nobleses without Starbucks because Starbucks is on the T-Mobile network). I was looking at the network of at&t hotspots near my zip code of 60615 (http://attwifi.know-where.com/attwifi/cgi/selection?mapx=&mapy=&mapid=US&lang=en&design=default&optionOPT1=&optionOPT2=&region=IL%2CUS&place=60615 ). It turns out there are 36 McDonald's within six miles of my zip code. It also turns out that there are several of what are described as Premier Roaming Locations. I am trying to determine what this means and whether I would have access to them because some of them are quite convenient to my common travels. Is anyone an experienced with the AT&T wifi network and this term in particular?
ganesh
AT&T has now teamed up with Starbucks and Starbucks is apparently ditching T-Mobile.

Anycase, if you are getting rid of the landline, the best bet for you would be to go in with a AT&T No Voice Line DSL plan.

http://www.att.com/gen/general?pid=10850

For around $24, you can have 1.5Mbps (not as fast as Cable which is 6Mbps from Comcast) without paying anything for a landline voice connection and any contract hassles.

Comcast is not a good option if you don't have cable TV connection with them. All their deals of $20 for 6 months stuff is applicable only if you are a existing cable subscriber (television), which basically screws you all over and you end up with a bill of $50 anyways. If you need a 6Mbps connection, you are still better off with the AT&T 6 Mbps which is only $39 (compared to $50 of Comcast, which is only for 6 months, and after that you are suddenly presented with a hefty bill of $100 for double play -- CableTV and Internet).
Tony The Tiger
I am looking forward to having Starbucks in addition to McDonalds. I joined a plan with a basic voice line so that I could get the AT&T wifi network as well for free. I got a 3.0 MB/Sec plan at $24.99/month.
landed
Quote:
DSL:

DSL or xDSL, is a family of technologies that provide digital data transmission over the wires of a local telephone network. DSL originally stood for digital subscriber loop, although in recent years, many[attribution needed] have adopted digital subscriber line as a more marketing-friendly term for the most popular version of consumer-ready DSL, ADSL. DSL uses high frequency; regular telephone uses low frequency.

Typically, the download speed of consumer DSL services ranges from 512 kilobits per second (kbit/s) to 24,000 kbit/s, depending on DSL technology, line conditions and service level implemented. Typically, upload speed is lower than download speed for Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL) and equal to download speed for Symmetric Digital Subscriber Line (SDSL).

Cable net:

The term cable Internet access or Cable Internet refers to the delivery of Internet service over this infrastructure. Cable modems, along with DSL technology, are the two primary types of broadband Internet access.

Bit rate of business cable modem service typically range from 2 megabits per second (Mbit/s) up to 50 Mbit/s or more. The upstream rate on residential cable modem service usually ranges from 384 kilobits per second (kbit/s) to 20 Mbit/s or more. Many cable operators offer different service tiers, some with 'home' and 'business' designations.
Tony The Tiger
landed wrote:
DSL:

DSL or xDSL, is a family of technologies that provide digital data transmission over the wires of a local telephone network. DSL originally stood for digital subscriber loop, although in recent years, many[attribution needed] have adopted digital subscriber line as a more marketing-friendly term for the most popular version of consumer-ready DSL, ADSL. DSL uses high frequency; regular telephone uses low frequency.

Typically, the download speed of consumer DSL services ranges from 512 kilobits per second (kbit/s) to 24,000 kbit/s, depending on DSL technology, line conditions and service level implemented. Typically, upload speed is lower than download speed for Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL) and equal to download speed for Symmetric Digital Subscriber Line (SDSL).

Cable net:

The term cable Internet access or Cable Internet refers to the delivery of Internet service over this infrastructure. Cable modems, along with DSL technology, are the two primary types of broadband Internet access.

Bit rate of business cable modem service typically range from 2 megabits per second (Mbit/s) up to 50 Mbit/s or more. The upstream rate on residential cable modem service usually ranges from 384 kilobits per second (kbit/s) to 20 Mbit/s or more. Many cable operators offer different service tiers, some with 'home' and 'business' designations.


O.K. I am not sure which is the commonly compared speed. Is my 3.0 MB/Sec the upload or download speed?
Jaan
Cable is alot more stable and reliable. If there's no diference in price/options then go for cable.
Psycho_X52
All my friend with DSL have a maximum speed of 350kb/s. I have cable and my speed can go up to 1000kb/s (10mbps...) I wanted to shift to a new plan of 20mbps, but I should wait 2 more months Sad .
The 20mbps plan is 25$.

The only problem I've got with cable was in vacations, when kids "downloaded the Internet", the servers where overwhelmed, but now it's fine Smile

[later edit]

my seed test:
Srs2388
my cable is really high. and it messes up alot here lately.
i have 1.5MB *(fast as they offer)* it's around 50 dollars a month.
I get around 200kbs in limewire downloading though with this wifi connection i have.
mcfearless
I have cable and as you can see from my speed test in sig the major problem is uploads. Telstra capped at 128 kb/s. I'm fine with this as it means I get more speed for downloads then I pay for(pay for 8 Mb/s connection and get between that and 12 Mbs/s when servers are quiet).
Tony The Tiger
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