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Does Brazil's history have any impact on you?





Da Rossa
... may be in any way. If you know anything about the Brazilian history, was there any particular thing that made you think "ohhh" or even say: "that was harsh", "I've never seen anything like that before", "poor man", "they were such modafokers", etc? Did you care/bother to study it's history sometime in the past, maybe when you were at school, etc?
tks.
Psycho_X52
We study history a lot, but all we know about Brazil’s history is between Conquistador’s period and WWI when colonial states lost most of their colonies...
btw: I like Capoeira Smile
Da Rossa
As we see... it appears that very few people actually have learned anything about Brazil... so the history can't touch anyone. Razz
Coclus
Yeas I don't know that much about the brazilian history neither, but I read something not to long ago how the "ordem and progresso" slogan became part of the national consciousness.
Da Rossa
Coclus wrote:
Yeas I don't know that much about the brazilian history neither, but I read something not to long ago how the "ordem and progresso" slogan became part of the national consciousness.


Unfortunately, thats only the slogan on the Flag Sad
deanhills
I lack serious knowledge and education about South America and would welcome your contribution in this. Most of my teaching as well as interest have been limited to Africa, Europe, Far East, Japan and North America. When I was a kid I often got confused between Argentina and Brazil. I get a feeling - general impression - that Argentina had most of the world's attention during the nineties during the Peronista years, and this has flipped at the turn of the century and Brazil is now receiving the major share of world invesment in economies of South America. Exports from Brazil has increased drastically after the turn of the century due to enormous investment in the economy of Brazil and its percentage exports to its steadily poorer neighbour, Argentina has grown over the years. BUT politically in Brazil there seems to be lack of freedom, almost, but not quite like the Peronista regime in Argentina of the nineties. Would like to hear your comment about the political system in Brazil vs. Argentina.
snowynight
i know Brasil is a country with many famous football players.
the capital is a city constructed under good plan.
the people there are enthusiastic.
simonwest80
As many people have said we lack very little insight outside of things important to "their countries". I come from the UK so my history is that of Romans, Egyptians, WW1, WW2 and a few other things in between (though only based in Australia, America, Africa and Europe).

We also get very Americanised in the UK as well, so some things where very misleading (for example i thought the amazon was somewhere not in Brasil). Then to find out some of the history is very eye opening, most people don't know that Brasil was under a military dictatorship up until very recently, and actual how developed Brasil is. I still say to alot of people i meet - you show a picture of Paulista Avenue to any American/European and if they have never been to Brasil i can guarantee that they would never say it is in Brasil....never.

You also don't relies how much Americans/Europeans helped in the development of Brasil in the 19th and 20th Century. Almost all the trains/mines where done by Europeans, lots of other things by Americans etc.
PromiseMe
Da Rossa wrote:
... may be in any way. If you know anything about the Brazilian history, was there any particular thing that made you think "ohhh" or even say: "that was harsh", "I've never seen anything like that before", "poor man", "they were such modafokers", etc? Did you care/bother to study it's history sometime in the past, maybe when you were at school, etc?
tks.


I haven't necessarily studied Brazilian History, but I do study Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. If a man from Japan who had studied Judo and Jiu Jitsu hadn't gone to America, competed in a little MMA, and then went to Brazil and taught the Gracie family (all hail) his art, then I would be without a method of self defense/hobby/sport/life. I guess I owe a lot to these guys.
Also, we own a Brazilian Mauser. Not that I've ever shot it, but an odd tidbit of information.
SpellcasterDX
To be honest I've never studied Brazilian history. I have absolutely no clue about it.
ciureanuc
The Brazilian history counts to EVERY country when it's come about global warming...
testeninha
Its very cool, because i'm brazilian Surprised
from Colony to Republic
from 1500 to 2008+ Razz

I'm in 8th grade, i have studied many things, but history is the best!!!!


good-bye
rapperx
Brazil is one of the largest country in the world as according to area its the largest producer of coffee. But Brazil is also famous for its corruption gangs and all that . People just said that Brazil is not a safe place to live. Redeemer of Christ is one of the wonders of the world which is gr8. It has beaches which attracts lotz of tourist. Its economical strong but it can't play a major role in changing world's economy.
WicCaesar
I never studied American nor other countries' history at school (but the ancient ones, like Greece, Rome, Egypt). I guess it's the same in other countries.

Despite it has only 508 years, many historic facts happened, but it may not sound quite interesting for usual foreigners.
arquivo
you can solve your problem faster at wikipedia....

I could tell you something about, but my english isnt good enough to tell a big history... well i can try a little about the start... the portugueses came here, killed almost all indians, toke the gold, bring the slaves and just used this country to get some power at that moment...
ptfrances
I don't think that Brazilian history has an effect on me or my life.
But brazilian history is interesting on many points.

Smile
frih
dont know the history
sketteksalfa
i love history and i love reading history books when im on a travel. but i havent heard anything about brazils history yet, i love to read it someday.
Da Rossa
Quote:
BUT politically in Brazil there seems to be lack of freedom, almost, but not quite like the Peronista regime in Argentina of the nineties. Would like to hear your comment about the political system in Brazil vs. Argentina.

Let's go.
You're right from a perspective. The freedom a Brazilian has is lower than the freedom an American has. Our Constitutions has a large list of fundamental rights, both individual and social, but sometimes they sound a little demagogic. They're in the paper, some of the rights are respected, some are simple promises. But we're facing another problem regarding freedom: the veiled destruction of the freedom of information. Some strong groups are getting together to control the big part of the media. This is not good at all. The media powerful people are connected to left-socialists that, in a very calm and slow way, intend to make your country socialist. That would be the end of your indiividual rights.

Thank God we have Internet, but, although we're one of the people that surf most hours/day in the world, the Brazilian doesn't exactly know the potential of the Internet. Some information have been "rejected" because they came from "unreliable blogs". Actually the blogs are dumpsters, but in some of them that you'll find the truth.
Da Rossa
simonwest80 wrote:
As many people have said we lack very little insight outside of things important to "their countries". I come from the UK so my history is that of Romans, Egyptians, WW1, WW2 and a few other things in between (though only based in Australia, America, Africa and Europe).

We also get very Americanised in the UK as well, so some things where very misleading (for example i thought the amazon was somewhere not in Brasil). Then to find out some of the history is very eye opening, most people don't know that Brasil was under a military dictatorship up until very recently, and actual how developed Brasil is. I still say to alot of people i meet - you show a picture of Paulista Avenue to any American/European and if they have never been to Brasil i can guarantee that they would never say it is in Brasil....never.

You also don't relies how much Americans/Europeans helped in the development of Brasil in the 19th and 20th Century. Almost all the trains/mines where done by Europeans, lots of other things by Americans etc.


Trust me, the dictatorship was a good thing for our country. The problem is that they ended up creating a bigger monster: their own left-oriented enemies, which control the country today, and plan doing even worse things in here. This is a lot of discussion, I'd probably get bashed by my compatriots for saying that but... they don't see it.
deanhills
Da Rossa wrote:
... I'd probably get bashed by my compatriots for saying that but... they don't see it.


Hopefully Da Rossa is a pseudonym? Smile

Seriously though, what is censorship like in Brazil?
Da Rossa
The censorship in here is, today, veiled. Since only a few big groups control 90% of the media, you see a tendency of the papers to publish the same stories, with the same point of view, just in other words. Less educated people don't see that. Even people more educated than me feel that this is "not big deal". That's what I'm afraid of.

In the past (1964-85), we had a right-oriented military dictatorship. The censorship was explicit. Not even a scene of a couple kissing would be aproved to be shown in the movies. Also, many people claim to have been "tortured" during that period. Not untrue, but it wasn't like that. Today, the people in control of the country (left-socialists) tend to keep comparing today with that times in the speech, saying that today we have a fully featured list of individual fundamental rights... true. But they owe the dictatorship a lot: the lesson.

Also, we can't condone the tortures, but even less the terrorist attacks. Yes, in here, we used to have a lot of guerillas that exploded airports, planted land mines, fire their rifles up, many times hitting innocent people "by accident". Those men are alive today, and I must say: too bad the "dictators" didn't come to them too. Now they work at the president's office. One of them, a know terrorist (that today says to be "proud to have fought the dictatorship"), named Tarso Genro, is pushing the Congress to review the amnesty law, from the 70's, that declared everyone - both military and guerillas - pardoned from everything. The intention is expressively to punish the "torturers" today (they're above 70 years old by now, many already dead), but refuses to say anything about the terrorists (which, in the worst case, are referred to as "guerillas").
Crinoid
My knowledge is also limited to the creation of the state, changing population, religious arthrosities (centuries ago), modern economy, including exports, safety, and ... soap operas Rolling Eyes
Love architecture, though!
Chinmoy
Why should it? I am in India!
abcxyz1
All what I know about the history of Brazilian football. I am a fan of the Brazilian team. Go go go, ale ale ale Razz Razz Razz Razz
Omega-hotelomega
No
gandalfthegrey
No. Not really. Brahma beer and Brazillian Jijitsu don't really effect my life.
goutha
The only impact of Brazil's history on me is when their national soccer team won the soccer world cup. I was very happy Smile And I think that this event is part of Brazil's history.
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