FRIHOST • FORUMS • SEARCH • FAQ • TOS • BLOGS • COMPETITIONS
You are invited to Log in or Register a free Frihost Account!


Many religious leaders back climate-change action





inphurno
A desire to exercise stewardship over the environment is growing among evangelical Christians.

Quote:
Religious groups in the United States and around the world have steadily adopted pro-environment positions. At Christmastime this shift has been particularly evident regarding global climate change.

The pros and cons of cutting down real Christmas trees (which absorb carbon dioxide, the primary greenhouse gas) versus buying an artificial tree (which may contain pollutants) weigh on the minds of many, says an article in The Christian Post.

More than 100 influential evangelical leaders have signed the Evangelical Climate Initiative (ECI) to fight global warming, the Post article says. They're asking governments and individuals to reduce CO2 emissions.

The ECI concludes that global warming is real. The Post article quotes from the initiative's statement:

"Christians, noting the fact that most of the climate change problem is human induced, are reminded that when God made humanity he commissioned us to exercise stewardship over the earth and its creatures.... Climate change is the latest evidence of our failure to exercise proper stewardship, and constitutes a critical opportunity for us to do better."

Leaders from the US Catholic Conference of Bishops, the National Association of Evangelicals, the National Council of Churches, and the Union of Reform Judaism are pushing Congress and the Bush administration to fund efforts for poorer areas to adapt to drought, flooding, and other effects of climate change. A blog at US News & World Report online quotes Paul Gorman, of the National Religious Partnership for the Environment:

"Poor and working-class people need advocates, and that is what the faith community traditionally does.... The single most striking thing about us and this issue is the degree of unity across the ideological spectrum. "

The human relationship to climate change was a key undercurrent to the recently concluded United Nations-sponsored talks in Bali, Indonesia. The Associated Press reported:

"The haves – which pump the lion's share of pollutants into the atmosphere – are arguing about emission targets and high-tech solutions. The have-nots – which contribute little to global warming but are disproportionately among the victims – need tens of billions of dollars to save [them]."

According to one recent poll mentioned in a story by The Economist, two-thirds of Evangelicals want immediate action on global warming. The story continues:

"The new mood reflects a generational change among evangelicals, says Andrew Walsh, a religion-watcher at Trinity College, Hartford [Conn.]. The younger lot wants to focus more on issues such as AIDS and the crisis in Darfur – a cluster of concerns that have more in common with climate change than with crusading against homosexuality."

This is not to say that all religious leaders have become born-again tree huggers. Pope Benedict XVI recently launched what Britain's Daily Mail called "a surprise attack on climate change prophets of doom."

The leader of the world's billion Roman Catholics suggested in his annual message for World Peace Day that fears about human-caused emissions causing unprecedented disasters amounted to "scaremongering." The story quoted Benedict:

"It is important for assessments in this regard to be carried out prudently, in dialogue with experts and people of wisdom, uninhibited by ideological pressure to draw hasty conclusions."

Writing in the Jerusalem Post, Rabbi Julian Sinclair, of "Tikkun Olam," the Jewish initiative on climate change, voiced a more positive theological outlook, saying that "religion is uniquely able" to mobilize "far-reaching changes in individual behavior." He concludes:

"Let us kindle all our Hanukka candles this year, and see in their light the hope that together we can act to ensure a safe climate future for ourselves, our children, the world's poorest and most vulnerable people, and all the creatures with whom we share God's earth."


http://www.csmonitor.com/2007/1220/p04s01-wogi.html
liljp617
For every one that believes in global climate change, there is ten who don't. And they constantly criticize those who do believe it, because somehow they deem climate change oppression towards religion -.- Question
smarter
liljp617 wrote:
For every one that believes in global climate change, there is ten who don't. And they constantly criticize those who do believe it, because somehow they deem climate change oppression towards religion -.- Question


Climate change, global warming in our case, is not a matter of belief, it is a matter of fact. LOL

Nobody denies climate change. But there are many who deny that the current global warming is caused by man or deny the predicted dire consequences.
liljp617
smarter wrote:
liljp617 wrote:
For every one that believes in global climate change, there is ten who don't. And they constantly criticize those who do believe it, because somehow they deem climate change oppression towards religion -.- Question


Climate change, global warming in our case, is not a matter of belief, it is a matter of fact. LOL

Nobody denies climate change. But there are many who deny that the current global warming is caused by man or deny the predicted dire consequences.

Actually there's plenty of people who deny it is even happening...especially in the religious community. Mainly due to the fact that science is making these statements and there are some extreme religious members who trust science in nothing. I didn't say I didn't believe it wasn't happening, but there are some who do...wouldn't take a long search to find some examples, but I have no motivation to do so at the moment.
inphurno
liljp617 wrote:
smarter wrote:
liljp617 wrote:
For every one that believes in global climate change, there is ten who don't. And they constantly criticize those who do believe it, because somehow they deem climate change oppression towards religion -.- Question


Climate change, global warming in our case, is not a matter of belief, it is a matter of fact. LOL

Nobody denies climate change. But there are many who deny that the current global warming is caused by man or deny the predicted dire consequences.

Actually there's plenty of people who deny it is even happening...especially in the religious community. Mainly due to the fact that science is making these statements and there are some extreme religious members who trust science in nothing. I didn't say I didn't believe it wasn't happening, but there are some who do...wouldn't take a long search to find some examples, but I have no motivation to do so at the moment.


the thing is that most people beleive that climate change is happening its just the media that make it look like their are 2 equally sized groups that are still debating this. its easy to find articles online of people that explain their "view" about why they feel climate change is not happening, this is because there is a small group of people that own the majority of the papers, magazines and tv stations. they control what is discussed and therefore they can push their version of what is happening, at least to the point where is enough confusion to prevent general consensus or make it seem like there is no consensus when the opposite is true.
Da Rossa
liljp617 wrote:
For every one that believes in global climate change, there is ten who don't.:


Was that a joke?
Please.
liljp617
Da Rossa wrote:
liljp617 wrote:
For every one that believes in global climate change, there is ten who don't.:


Was that a joke?
Please.

Go read. There are dozens of religious leaders who denounce global climate change and criticize their colleagues who believe in it.
Bikerman
There is no doubt that many Christian-right churches and church leaders have been openly sceptical about AGW (Anthropomorphic Global Warming - ie caused by man). Their views are sometimes driven by religious opposition to science in general, sometimes just from pure ignorance, but most often by a combination of the two (as with their views on creation, evolution etcetera).

My own attitude has always been that I don't really care what a group of fundamentalists say or believe, providing it doesn't unduly influence national and global policy. *
I don't think the Christian Right can be blamed, for example, for the reluctance of the US to engage meaningfully with the issue - it is much more an economic issue than a religiously-driven issue in the States.

In most European countries, thankfully, the influence of the Christian fundamentalists is pretty minor, so even where they do spout their ignorant clap-trap about AGW not many people are really listening to them.

* Important distinction; If a climatologist, who happens to be a Christian, speaks AS a climatologist on the issue of AGW then I would consider their views meaningful and worth consideration. If anyone, whatever their specialism, speaks AS a Christian on the issue of AGW, however, I would consider their views to be meaningless and not worthy of consideration. Why should a particular religious view qualify one to speak with authority on a scientific issue?
Da Rossa
liljp617 wrote:

Go read. There are dozens of religious leaders who denounce global climate change and criticize their colleagues who believe in it.


You posted the "fact", so please, follow the forum rules and quote your source. Then I'll read.
Soulfire
*Sighs*

I've never been convinced that we're 100% responsible for global warming. I really think it's just us coming out of the mini ice-age of the 1800s. My aunt was telling me how in the 1970s it was so cold that people wanted to dump ash onto the polar ice caps to warm the earth.

Over-politicized garbage if you ask me. Reduce emissions, but c'mon, be rash as well.
Bikerman
Soulfire wrote:
*Sighs*

I've never been convinced that we're 100% responsible for global warming. I really think it's just us coming out of the mini ice-age of the 1800s. My aunt was telling me how in the 1970s it was so cold that people wanted to dump ash onto the polar ice caps to warm the earth.

Over-politicized garbage if you ask me. Reduce emissions, but c'mon, be rash as well.

I don't know of any climate scientists who are saying that humans are 100% responsible for GW. There are certainly other factors in play - this is generally accepted. The only one we can directly change, however, is our own contribution, which is certainly significant and possibly decisive. The scientific arguments are far too detailed to go into in this forum and any attempt I make to summarise them would run the risk of reducto-ad-absurdum. That, coupled with the fact that I am not qualified to speak authoratitively on this subject, is the reason I have not joined the debate here.

If you want to be informed by the science rather than by political or economic interest groups then I suggest you look to forums where this debate is being held in some detail. I would suggest:
http://www.sciencefile.org/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?board=ClimateChange
as a starting point.
If you want my own opinion it is quite simple -
1.Yes, AGW is a reality.
2.Yes, it will lead to major problems in the world. Possibly it will reach a 'tipping-point' with catastrophic consequences.
3.Yes, we can do something about it.
4.Yes we should do whatever possible to reduce emissions of CO2, C2H4 etc.
perlpoint
surely it's important the attenction they're paying to our globe.

when God created earth he commited the first couple to take care of our earth.

but I think that religious some times want more media status than a really touching care.

think 'bout it.
icecool
what's going on in this world?
here we are committing species suicide on a global scale and people are still bickering who is right and who is wrong?
i am not a religious man in the sense of proclaiming that i "belong" to any particular denomination of faith - i try to lead a good life and that's good enough for me.
but i have a brain
i have eyes
i look around me and see evidence that as man we have dismally failed to take care of the ONLY planet we have to live on for just now.
and just as in times past we look to god or some other diety to give us guidance.
when do we take ownership and responsibility for OUR OWN actions??
when - not if - this ship we call earth sinks there are no life boats.

we are only custodians passing through and we have failed - and we still lok for somebody else to blame.

i have decided a long time ago not to have children so i will not be responsible of having put another human soul onto this dying planet. what about YOUR kids? what are you going to tell them in 30 or 50 years when they have to go to the store to buy their oxygen supplements? pray harder?
coolclay
Quote:
For every one that believes in global climate change, there is ten who don't. And they constantly criticize those who do believe it, because somehow they deem climate change oppression towards religion


You apparently don't hang out with very many Christians.
smarter
icecool wrote:
what's going on in this world?

Debate. Change. Life.

icecool wrote:
here we are committing species suicide on a global scale and people are still bickering who is right and who is wrong?

Human species is at its prime. Even an all-out nuclear war will not make man an extinct species (as opposed to civilization).

icecool wrote:
but i have a brain

So does George W. Bush!

icecool wrote:
i have eyes

You mean you have TV!

icecool wrote:
i look around me and see evidence that as man we have dismally failed to take care of the ONLY planet we have to live on for just now.

Like we are really trying to do that!
And how many places "on earth" have you seen (before and after) to make such a "global" assertion?

icecool wrote:
when do we take ownership and responsibility for OUR OWN actions??

Never. This is a human trait. Seriously!

icecool wrote:
when - not if - this ship we call earth sinks there are no life boats.

All things come to an end. With or without human help. Anyway in the not-so-distant future man will colonize other planets/satellites.

icecool wrote:
i have decided a long time ago not to have children so i will not be responsible of having put another human soul onto this dying planet.

The only positive thing in your post!
Just kidding! Kids will surely put many smiles on your face!

PS: When I happen about a pessimistic post like this one I cannot help myself.

PPS: As I said nothing on the topic, here is my opinion: I find this movement a good one. Pro-environment position and attitude is welcomed from anybody but especially from people able to influence others.
Related topics
Gay Marriage
Help Predict Climate Change
British Prime Minister Blames Floods on Climate Change
Climate change escalates Darfur crisis
Climate Change/Global Warming
Australia’s Great Barrier Reef - Dealing with Climate Change
Education on Climate Change
Bush censored climate change report. Obama releases it.
Climate change
Advice for the IPCC climate change panel, from a contributor
Burn a Quran day.
Climate change data
Looking for a document about climate change
Report : Climate change & serious errors of design .
Reply to topic    Frihost Forum Index -> Lifestyle and News -> Discuss World News

FRIHOST HOME | FAQ | TOS | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | SITE MAP
© 2005-2011 Frihost, forums powered by phpBB.