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How your country treat gifted children





adeydas
How does your country treat gifted children... children with extraordinary mental and analytical abilities?

For reference, see this post: http://adeydas.com/abhi/geniuses-who-need-care/
iyepes
I have to say that in my country there's no official policy to treat gifted children. They depend upon their parents (how whealth they are) and some private institutions.

Hardly handicaped children have special institutions, however recently they were obligated to take courses in the same schools than common children. It's said that id advocates to equity and social integration, however it left them without support of trained teachers, because they are left with teachers who don't know about ways to stimulate them.

Gifted children would have the same issue, since constitution states equity, any kind of program to privilege some people will be against the law. A total paradox, their abilities can't be developed in governmental programs. They totally depend on private and individual efforts.
Peterssidan
I don't think my country make anything special with "gifted children". They are humans like all other children and should be treated like everybody else.
Jaan
In Canada there are a few programs. "Gifted" program. "International Baccalaureate" program is a harder version of U.S.'s Adanced Placement. But do these work? I can't say for sure. I can tell you from friends' experiences that there is always lots of work and pressure from teachers. This is one reason that turns me away from them (even though I probably wouldn't make it in). I like my unstructured play time.
Kitten Kong
Over here is Australia we don't have any government sponsored gifted child program that I am aware of. Without tooting my own trumped too hard I will say that in my last year of primary school I was recommended by my teacher as a gifted child. I was sent to an organisation called CHIP (Children of High Intellectual Potential) and tested on my various mental merits. In the end all I got out of it was a letter of recommendation to give to any potential high schools that would guarantee placement and perhaps even a scholarship but in the end although that amounted to a few grand off my high school tuition I don't think it got me a better education, although that might just be due to the dodgy private school I went to not really being as elite as the brochure made out.
skygaia
In my country, there are some programs for gifted children. But it dosen't work well. Because every parents want their children to be gifted children. So they tried to send their children to private school for entering of special programs for gifted children. it costs lots of money.. Crying or Very sad
raine dragon
Peterssidan wrote:
I don't think my country make anything special with "gifted children". They are humans like all other children and should be treated like everybody else.


mmm, I'm not so sure I agree.

Imagine for a moment that at the age of 19 you were in a class room with 10 year olds. Being taught as if you were 10-years old. Reading books designed for 10-year-olds. It is the most.. mentally numbing thing... It goes beyond boredom, because you have to pay attention and you have to do all this meaningless work, which is far below you interest, or level of understanding.

...it's terribly depressing.

I'm not saying that I want them to be treated as 'different'. Put into a social environment and then tagged as 'abnormal'... because that itself leads to being ashamed of being different..

but, oh, to be trapped in the mundane, to be forced to craw when you want nothing more then to run.. it's.. there aren't words for it. It breaks one's spirit, it pounds upon one in a way that... it's simply frustrating.

There were special programs at my school in which, in 5th grade, at the age of 10, I read books which were written for children in 6th grade, or, 11-year-olds. I was already reading on a college reading comprehension level. I found the first book interesting, read it in a day or two and then had weeks worth of questions which I found trivial and bothersome. So, I put little effort into answering them, after all.. they were such simple questions. The teacher in turn, decided that my short answers were an indication that I did not understand what I was reading. So I was transfered to a group that was reading a book written for 4th graders.

and we read aloud. Word by word. Expected to place our finger under each word as it was read. (At home I read classic novels). If one were to stop pointing at the words, or to say the word that the person beside you was stuttering over, one was scolded. I often was caught day dreaming, or forgot myself and said the word after some poor child stumbled over it for 5 min, red faced an humiliated that he had to keep trying when he felt he couldn't get it. I hated knowing. How bothersome to not be able to sit there an be blissfully clueless as to what the word was! If I could have at least been on their level I might have been able to privately stumble over the word in my own head.. but these were words I used often, and had been reading for years!

it was.. a horribly unpleasant situation. I remember it clearly 11 years later. Picking at staples stuck in the carpet and counting the number of letter on a page out of sheer boredom.

I can not say, honestly that I would wish that on another child.
ashish2005
In my country, I do not know of any special programs that are specially meant for gifted children. I have not even heard of any gifted children on any media like television, radio etc of my country. But I am sure that there are a lot of gifted children in my country who are getting no special attention. Only the wealthy kids get some attention. Others, they are probably undiscovered and some go to some other country and use their special abilities.
j_f_k
In the UK absolutely great


....


if the kids lucky enough to have parents that can afford private school
KronikSindrome
Well, we usualy try to make money off them....
either we sell them on the black market to yuppie scum
who want to buy smart babbies, or we exploit them ourselves
one way or another, or we raise them secretly in our basements
and train them to go on Jepordy and win us a million dollars!!!!!!
(Just like they did to Ken Jennigs)

Either that or we just make them feel lame.....

"like OH MY GOD!" that kid is such a dork! he like, talks about math,
and like laughs at these confusing jokes our lit. teacher makes, and
he totaly knows everything but where to buy clothes apparently"....
"hahah yeah, I know, like for sure."

and then they go crazy and kill themselves,
or shoot up their schools and go to jail for life.......


yeah......my country totaly supports smart people Wink

but we only want to hang out with the fun ones,
sleep with the pretty ones, and of course we
elect the stupid one's into government offices Very Happy
riv_
Socially - badly.
Clinically - badly.
But we all talk very nicely about how much we value them, and about what an egalitarian society we are, and about how we provide equal opportunities for all people, and adapt programs to meet everyone's needs, and never discriminate against anybody.
So I guess that makes it OK.
Da Rossa
Socially: they make a "ohhh", if the gift is very intense then he or she may suffer a little hassle. No speeeeeecial schools for the gifted - actually there are very few people in here that are really capable of dealing with that kind of kid. Most of them are not even recognized, unfortunately, if they happen to be, an ordinary teacher would just make some compliments or even treat him or her differently, no matter for better or for worse - different treatment in the school environment is very bad to the kids in any way. However, if a kid like that grow up and have a "normal" social teenagehood, then maybe some people will value him or her. Oh, almost forgotten - this is Brazil.
Helios
Here in Israel there are special schools for "gifted" kids.
When they grow up (age wise), some are treated in special places by psychologists and guided/trained personnel.
Though parents can choose whether to put their special child to a normal school, most choose to sign them up to a special school.
I'm obviously talking about the worst of cases, when such child will never grow up in his mind.

I remember that in Jr. High we had one of those kids in my class, whose parents decided to send him to a normal school. Most of us treated him quite well. I mean, he wasn't "one of the guys", but nobody treated him badly.

So yeah, I'd say they treat them well here.
adeydas
Helios wrote:
Here in Israel there are special schools for "gifted" kids.
When they grow up (age wise), some are treated in special places by psychologists and guided/trained personnel.
Though parents can choose whether to put their special child to a normal school, most choose to sign them up to a special school.
I'm obviously talking about the worst of cases, when such child will never grow up in his mind.

I remember that in Jr. High we had one of those kids in my class, whose parents decided to send him to a normal school. Most of us treated him quite well. I mean, he wasn't "one of the guys", but nobody treated him badly.

So yeah, I'd say they treat them well here.


i am not talking about retarded children... this post is about gifted children, children with a higher level of intelligence than common people of their age!!!
Helios
Haha, I misunderstood you completely. I'm terribly sorry Laughing

Well, students with higher level of intelligence treated extremely well here.
Most schools, as far as I know, have special classes for such students.
I was in a class like that myself.
As you know or may not know, army service in Israel is compulsory service. This means that when you're done with high-school, you either pick up a M2 or support those who hold the lines.
There are however special programs for students with higher abilities:
there are several common excellence programs, that put these students through a long course, after which they complete the service at the age of 28 with a M.Sc degree in their chosen profession (mostly engineering), and an officer's rank in the army (captain or even major). They may choose to stay in the army any work there, or leave the army. Either way is good.
KronikSindrome
hahah....for a second I thought I posted wrong...

I was like "oohhh by "gifted" you mean mentaly hanicapped?"

here in the US we do call mentaly challenged children
"gifted"...or more commonly "Special"......

but yeah....I I had it right...

the smart kids we make money off of...

the mentaly challenged ones we pretty much ignore and try
to avoid because we feel uncomfortable dealing with them....

I've always wondered why people don't like talking to "challenged people"
because I find it extremely intertaining. I like talking to senial old people
too, I always love those "oh yeah so how's elvis doin grandma? I mean I
saw him like three weeks ago but I know you two see eachother everyday."
conversations. Twisted Evil Wink

I like stupid kids better than smart kids,
cause the smart kids are usualy antisocial
and will be like "it's are NOT, not AINT.
Oh my god, I bet you don't even no what
an omeba is" and then I have to be like
"no, I don't....but I can do THIS!" and then I
put them in headlocks and give them noogies. Cool
ozziejim
here in australia i notced there are some schools with special classes for the gifted children, in most cases this is to prevent the child becoming bored and irratated in a normal classroom, and disrupting the class. In some cases children are moved forward a grade.

I only saw these classes in primary schools, and im not sure if it continued through high school.
adeydas
KronikSindrome wrote:
hahah....for a second I thought I posted wrong...

I was like "oohhh by "gifted" you mean mentaly hanicapped?"

here in the US we do call mentaly challenged children
"gifted"...or more commonly "Special"......

but yeah....I I had it right...

the smart kids we make money off of...

the mentaly challenged ones we pretty much ignore and try
to avoid because we feel uncomfortable dealing with them....

I've always wondered why people don't like talking to "challenged people"
because I find it extremely intertaining. I like talking to senial old people
too, I always love those "oh yeah so how's elvis doin grandma? I mean I
saw him like three weeks ago but I know you two see eachother everyday."
conversations. Twisted Evil Wink

I like stupid kids better than smart kids,
cause the smart kids are usualy antisocial
and will be like "it's are NOT, not AINT.
Oh my god, I bet you don't even no what
an omeba is" and then I have to be like
"no, I don't....but I can do THIS!" and then I
put them in headlocks and give them noogies. Cool


were you hurt in the head when you were four 'coz your talk doesn't really make any sense and they are as immature as anything can be!!!
ThornsOfSorrow
I'm not sure if the entire country is like this, but here we have something called "The Creative Learning Program". Children exhibiting high intelligence in elementary and middle school are automatically enrolled in the program. While these children are still stuck in the same classes as everyone else in their grade (for the most part), CLP offers after school classes and activities that are more difficult or at least more interesting. While I didn't fully take advantage of CLP, I did join an after-school scenario writing class in 4th or 5th grade, which was both interesting and challenging, especially as it was also some sort of writing contest. I also did something in middle school (in place of some of my normal classes) that involved finding ways to make the school more energy efficient. The things taught in that program were actually somewhat overwhelming for me at the time, but I learned a lot as a result.

Besides CLP, the middle school offers advanced science and english classes, for those students who grasp those concepts more easily than others. After middle school, high school classes are offered in three different levels. Struggling students are enrolled in Level 1 classes, while average students are in Level 2 classes and "advanced" students attend Level 3 classes. This helps everyone as the struggling students aren't left behind and the advanced students aren't being held back. In addition, AP classes are also offered. Those are basically college level classes, which is nice because the credit for taking these classes can often be transferred to certain colleges. So, to sum things up, I think gifted students are treated quite well here.
KronikSindrome
oh...yah....

there's always TAG....talented and gifted.....
or "targetd as game" in school terms.

even the most scolastic people I knew in school end
up working either:

high paying jobs their parents or mentors pushed them into
and being emotionaly, socialy, miserable.......

OR....

working min wage jobs and while being, emotionaly,
socialy, happy still feel unsatisfied from a sense of
being 'under utilized' menatly.......

but of course that is just from mmyyy perception....
and everyone knows that viewing the world through
an individual perception is like viewing an entire room
through the site of a keyhole...ever incomplete and
never fully encompassing.

yeah okay I'm done...

sorry me no talk right,
me do good when me
be less ignorant as
if me choose to up grow...... Very Happy


Shocked ..... Question ....... Idea Exclamation ...oh.....



Twisted Evil
JBotAlan
I don't know if there are programs in place for young gifted children; it didn't seem that there was was much of anything when I was in elementary school. In Kindergarten, I was laughing at the more advanced jokes built into the children's stories the teacher read; in first and second grade I spent the entire time playing computer. I was bored out of my mind--I was not challenged at all writing my name, as the other children in my class were. I never learned to interact with the other children because the difference in mental ability made it very hard to interact on the same level...and that put me where I am now...nerd-dom.

But it seems children are missing more and more of the skills they need coming into the low end of the school system. Or at least the difference between the smartest and the dumbest is getting bigger. Programs to handle the kids on the other end of the spectrum--bad "special", not gifted--seem to be more important with the onslaught of cases of autism and A.D.D....

I really don't know what the solution is.
nilsmo
A big problem is that children cannot easily be labeled "Gifted" and "Not Gifted." Each child has some advantages and some disadvantages. Also if you separate out the "Gifted" kids, it may be demoralizing for the rest.
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