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I love the Russian language!





ocalhoun
So, on a whim, I picked a book on the Russian language off of the shelf in my library.
At first I was baffled by the cryllic alphabet, but once you learn that, the language is amazingly easy!
There is no word for 'is' or 'to be', which greatly simplifies simple sentences.
There is no word for 'the' either, again making things simple.
And, the only difference between a question and a statement is the question mark; no rearranging the words!

And above all that, it's great fun to be learning a language that is so foreign being able to write in a different alphabet, and say distinctly Russian words is great fun! I love seeing people's faces when I show them what I'm reading, and they can't even pronounce the words, because of the unfamiliar letters, much less know what they mean!
{name here}
ocalhoun wrote:
So, on a whim, I picked a book on the Russian language off of the shelf in my library.
At first I was baffled by the cryllic alphabet, but once you learn that, the language is amazingly easy!

Cyrillic is an easy alphabet to learn - almost as easy as Gothic or Futhark. If you want a challenge, try Korean or perhaps Ancient Greek. You don't even need to go out of the Latin alphabet if you want a complex and hard to read alphabet for English speakers.

Quote:
There is no word for 'is' or 'to be', which greatly simplifies simple sentences.

There is no word for 'the' either, again making things simple.

I can understand getting rid of rather useless articles but "is" and "to be"? That sort of complicates things, I'd think.

Quote:

And, the only difference between a question and a statement is the question mark; no rearranging the words!

Isn't that a bit confusing in day to day speech considering the only difference would be tone?

Quote:
And above all that, it's great fun to be learning a language that is so foreign being able to write in a different alphabet, and say distinctly Russian words is great fun! I love seeing people's faces when I show them what I'm reading, and they can't even pronounce the words, because of the unfamiliar letters, much less know what they mean!

ja (ya) - Polish for "I"
ja - Russian for "I" (represented by a backwards "R")

tata - Polish for "Father"
tatushka - Russian for "Father"

mama - Polish for "Mother"
mamushka - Russian for "Mother"

waluta (Pronnounced Val-oo-ta) - Polish for "Currency"
valjuta (Pronnounced val-yoo-ta) - Russian for "Currency"

They're not so distinctly Russian outside of their alphabet. Inside, it looks similar to other slavic languages, sometimes rather close.
ocalhoun
{name here} wrote:

I can understand getting rid of rather useless articles but "is" and "to be"? That sort of complicates things, I'd think.

Well, instead of saying 'the book is blue', you can just say 'book blue' Much easier, especially considering how some languages tend to make 'to be' verbs irregular and hard to learn, with lots of different tenses.
Vytelo
I also like this language. I even learnt it until 10 form, because Russia is near and this language might be usefull.
Arseniy
Hahaha!!))) Laughing
It's so funny looking on description of your native languague by foreign people)))
Ocalhoun, I can help you in your study if you need.
And people say that Russian is one of the most difficult languagues round the world. Don't believe them! It's quite easier than Chinese!)
{name here}
Arseniy wrote:
Hahaha!!))) Laughing
It's so funny looking on description of your native languague by foreign people)))
Ocalhoun, I can help you in your study if you need.
And people say that Russian is one of the most difficult languagues round the world. Don't believe them! It's quite easier than Chinese!)

People say the same thing about Polish. Once you get used to the pronnounciations of everything, Polish and Russian are definately not that hard.
ocalhoun
Arseniy wrote:

Ocalhoun, I can help you in your study if you need.

Alas, I don't have enough time to learn it before shipping out to the air force. (Hey, I've been studying Spanish for 5 years now, and still have a very imperfect grasp of it!) I hope to be able to find a way to get the air force to give me classes in Russian.
razum2um
Quote:
It's so funny looking on description of your native languague by foreign people)))

it is, indeed.
ocalhoun, you hadn't had deal with Russian system of gender and قول (i don't know how to translate, excuse me Smile of verbs...
But in general, you are right.
I love my language too
Smile
dimedrol-tab
Oooh.. Russian language is realy very difficult. Even in Russa there are a lot of people, who doesn't know it in perfect.
Imho, you will know language only when you will can talk about EVERYTHING on it without halts.
ocalhoun
dimedrol-tab wrote:
Oooh.. Russian language is realy very difficult. Even in Russa there are a lot of people, who doesn't know it in perfect.
Imho, you will know language only when you will can talk about EVERYTHING on it without halts.

There are plenty of people in America who can barely speak English too ^.^
There will always be those who gain a child's understanding of the language, then never enhance their understanding any more than to supplement it with profanity.
razum2um
Quote:
There are plenty of people in America who can barely speak English too ^.^

There are plenty of people in Russia who can't speak Russian speaking Albanian instead
Wink
ocalhoun
Oh, I'm not talking about immigrants or ethnic minorities there... I mean native speakers of any language will always include some too lazy to ever become truly fluent.
Phinx
Personaly i'm fluent in Russian, though i'm not from Russia. My mom is and as i was growing up i learned my native language - Lithuanian, and Russian at the same time. I always speak with my parent in russian and with most of my friends in Lithuanian. When i was at school, i noticed a pattern, it ended being that from about 8:00 till 15:00 i speak in Lithuanian and the rest of the evening and night in Russian Very Happy

So if anyone need any help with learning Russian i would be more than glad to help Smile
mikakiev
Learning Russian.Can help people who are willing to know about russian language more:)
sigT
Phinx wrote:
When i was at school, i noticed a pattern, it ended being that from about 8:00 till 15:00 i speak in Lithuanian and the rest of the evening and night in Russian Very Happy


Interesting. Smile I think Russian and Lithuanian are close languages, although maybe not many words are shared. I had Lithuanian friends who had the same kind of a bilingual education.

Russian as first language helps to learn other languages including English and especially French because of a clear articulation. I know a little someone who has benefited from her native Russian in an early age.

Also, if you manage the Russian "R" you can do the English and French ones with ease!
ganjour
Quote:

tata - Polish for "Father"
tatushka - Russian for "Father"

mama - Polish for "Mother"
mamushka - Russian for "Mother"

waluta (Pronnounced Val-oo-ta) - Polish for "Currency"
valjuta (Pronnounced val-yoo-ta) - Russian for "Currency"


tata - Polish for "Father"
papa (papochka) - Russian for "Father"

mama - Polish for "Mother"
mama (mamochka) - Russian for "Mother"

waluta (Pronnounced Val-oo-ta) - Polish for "Currency"
val(soft)uta (Pronnounced val(soft)-oo-ta) - Russian for "Currency", only soft "l" required
P.S. I'm russian Smile
peterjames1
Russian Language is very easy language for learning and language translation and any one can easily learn that language without any problem.
inuyasha
I was told there's a syllable which is pronounced without the tongue but the tonsil. Have you learnt how to pronouce it? I'm really curious about the training method.
ocalhoun
inuyasha wrote:
I was told there's a syllable which is pronounced without the tongue but the tonsil.


The 'X'? (The Cyrillic 'X', completely different from the English 'X')

Never had any trouble pronouncing it myself, but I find picking up accents and new sounds to be easy...


On that note, I've noticed a few similarities between Russian and Hebrew... Is there a connection there somewhere, or is it just coincidence?
Arseniy
Quote:
I've noticed a few similarities between Russian and Hebrew... Is there a connection there somewhere, or is it just coincidence?


I don't think there really is a connection, because if to look from the point of historical linguistics they are completely different, from different lingua families - Semitic and Hindo-European. Maybe some borrowings were made because of religion and the high percent of hebrews in Russia for all the times, but it's not in the roots definetely.
confess
My Russian language is poor,but I want to learn. Rolling Eyes
D'Artagnan
i like russian too, my main problem is getting used to the cyrilic alphabet
artasua
I think the best Ukrainian and lighter than of the Russian
zhybsc
i think so. Rolling Eyes
akastenas
Hello everyone:) I am half-russian half-lithuanian, so let me knof if you need any practical infor regarding the languages mentioned.

Russian is indeed hard to master language, not only because of the alphabet, but because of 3 genders, and lots and lots of irregular words:)
pravojednostavno
Arseniy wrote:

And people say that Russian is one of the most difficult languagues round the world. Don't believe them! It's quite easier than Chinese!)


Yeah! def! Laughing
pravojednostavno
artasua wrote:
I think the best Ukrainian and lighter than of the Russian


Completely agree with you. Ukrainian is so melodic and native to heart. Applause
vedy
ocalhoun wrote:
So, on a whim, I picked a book on the Russian language off of the shelf in my library.
At first I was baffled by the cryllic alphabet, but once you learn that, the language is amazingly easy!
There is no word for 'is' or 'to be', which greatly simplifies simple sentences.
There is no word for 'the' either, again making things simple.
And, the only difference between a question and a statement is the question mark; no rearranging the words!

And above all that, it's great fun to be learning a language that is so foreign being able to write in a different alphabet, and say distinctly Russian words is great fun! I love seeing people's faces when I show them what I'm reading, and they can't even pronounce the words, because of the unfamiliar letters, much less know what they mean!


a pleasure to read your kind words. Related to language nakotorom I say.
thank you Smile
o4obo4o
Reallllly? What? I hateeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee it men!
ru5h666
akastenas wrote:
Hello everyone:) I am half-russian half-lithuanian, so let me knof if you need any practical infor regarding the languages mentioned.

Russian is indeed hard to master language, not only because of the alphabet, but because of 3 genders, and lots and lots of irregular words:)


There are a lot of other languages that have 3 genders. Personally I find it really hard to learn Latvian and Lithuanian. Got some right tongue twisters in there Smile
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