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Future





qazwsx741
what the world will be like in 100 years? Have you imagined in your mind?
I think the world will be like this.
1, we needn;t to use paper money, if we want something,we can go to the shop to fetch it without paying.
2, we will have a machine which can do anything for us,like wshing,cleaning and even be drived.
haha! what is your idea?
brucedes
We'll see the emergence of super states I think, such as the United States of Europe which is clearly happening right now. I don't think we'll be seeing an orwellian state of constant war though. I'm not saying war won't exist, just not like Orwell predicted it.

I also think we'll be seeing the increased accountability of politicians through the internet. I mean look at Burma. Despite the governments attempt to censor the net, it's getting through. This will help with the democratic process, I think.
chasbeen
It would still exist but most people will use bartering to get by. Cottage industry will thrive with artists exchanging ornaments for bread or a farmer will trade milk for a live music show. This will be the only real way people exist after the collapse of the electronic money system. Wink
arquivo
well try to keep the planet alive, using less energy and living more like in the old times, the tecnology will help us to see the world by a different view, something like: you arent a machine, so, live more and plug less... and than, when we find the way to enjoy more our organic nature, i think the life will be better...
MaxStirner
I'm afraid I am a bit more pessimistic than the previous postings. Examining some of the problems we are facing today ...

  • pollution and climate change
  • nuclear (arms) proliferation
  • overpopulation
  • a blatantly asymmetric distribution of wealth and power
  • Dwindling sources of energy
  • Growing scarcity of fresh water
  • ...

... I am pessimistic as to our solving any of these in the next century. And if we are not able to do so, then what we are looking at is a world with 14 to 18 billion inhabitants defined by a larger number of natural catastrophes with the accompanying crop failures, famine and political instability. Wealthy nations closing their borders and defending these against ever greater numbers of poor who attempt to escape their misery and rising numbers of terrorist attacks, using perhaps crude but effective nuclear weapons.
Our so highly praised globalization will be threatened by the break-away of markets in areas of civil unrest or military conflict (or me resort to building weapons to further fan these fires), secure transportation of goods will become increasingly difficult and costly and if this reaches a scale which severely affects standards of living in wealthier countries, then even stable political systems will possibly be in danger.

Sorry about the bad news.
Max
Chris24
There won't be a world in 100 years. The way we are destroying everything God gave us, nothing will be left except maybe a few rodents or roaches. Sorry to sound this way but, in my opinion the world has gone so far downhill that I don't see us recovering.
ciureanuc
what the world will be like in 100 years?

I am wondering, if you asked this question in 1400 or even 1780 what kind of answers you've gotten...
3-4 years ago we didn't know about LCD monitors, 10 years ago mobile phones were a dream, 100 years ago the streets was made for "horsing power" (it really was a story about why the streets are wide like they are... to fit two horses). I don't know when umbrella was invented but when the inventor came with it on the street, people was laughing...
Do we all remember about Y2K so called virus? A JOKE...

Well, what the world will be like in 100 years? WHO KNOWS??
MaxStirner
ciureanuc wrote:
what the world will be like in 100 years?

I am wondering, if you asked this question in 1400 or even 1780 what kind of answers you've gotten...
3-4 years ago we didn't know about LCD monitors, 10 years ago mobile phones were a dream, 100 years ago the streets was made for "horsing power" (it really was a story about why the streets are wide like they are... to fit two horses). I don't know when umbrella was invented but when the inventor came with it on the street, people was laughing...
Do we all remember about Y2K so called virus? A JOKE...

Well, what the world will be like in 100 years? WHO KNOWS??


True, we are very inventive and it would be difficult to foresee what technical advancements the next 100 years hold in store. What we do know, is that we seem to have the unerring impulse to make every possible invention or discovery into a weapon, ... and use these. That has not changed in the last few millenniums, so we will probably have a world as chaotic and conflict-ridden as it is today, only a larger number of smaller groups and factions will have access to larger and deadlier weaponry. World War I was falsely thought to be the war to end all wars, the next one could very well be.
Silk2008
I think the currency of the future will be space and time. Space to stand, sit, sleep. Time for family, career, health maintenance, education. We are breeding like rabbits so over time it is inevidible that real estate will be an issue until we colonize some other place.
hpphkl
I actually see these bad events as good things. How much cars have developed in 100 years and computers? Difference between them is huge. Did we know and care about environment before as we do now? I'm sure people in wars think its end of the world but actually science has take huge steps on war time. So I think world will be better place after these bad events. I think everything human have ever dream of, we have made true in future. I dream about harmony and peace within this world. I hope it will be here after 100 years=)
aswapathy
The rest of us will be raising worms and growing vegetables.
GoldWyvern
I think that the UFO's spotted over history are actually future versions of us who have gone back in time to observe periods of their own history.

Hey, I'm allowed to theorize!

Seriously tho, there is no possible way to predict the future. If history has taught us anything, values will change, morality will change, and technology will evolve - and sputter. Anything you think about the world will most certainly change, except our base values. Those being, cave man or future man, we will always value the same things - love, and family to name a few.
nigam
Based on todays situation, everything rises up even on our daily needs. Foods, gas consumption, shelter are very expensive now a days. I can see in the next 100 years, that people will be fighting for food, people will eat once a day, many burglars in the streets, over populated, no more greeny mountains, evrything will be done by machines, there will be robots walking in the streets and mostly, they will rule the world.
Cddhesh
Well , i fear about todays situation, Rate at which things are rising and resources are getting exhausted is very bad.forget 100 years, Within 10 years i feel there will be fights for resources like petrol, Pollution factor is also there hope there will be no fight for oxygen Smile .This can be the situation.Our great scientists are trying out experiments to make life better proportional to that there are terrorists who want to destroy everything.I am finding life very funny these days.
ptfrances
I hope the world is not going to be a oven... I hope people could enjoy wonderful landscapes, summertimes and cool breeze of spring and not an Earth as a big waste.
And of course that humankind could live in peace and respect each other as much as possible
Arrow
shamurokku
Im still in the lineup for the jet pack.

Earth? In a hundred years well all be living on Mars.
deanhills
Hmmmm ... it will be 2108 then.

Maybe people would have wizened up on the destruction of using oil and we will have electronic cars. Or who knows, maybe someone will have found a way where we do not need to travel but can beep ourselves from one spot to the other like they did in Startrek. Think that would be neat.

I think there will be even less privacy than we already have now with the advent of the Internet. Already people can identify the exact location of your computer. One of these days they may be able to put all of your information together and link it to your computer. Instead of asking for your Social Security they will ask for your computer ID.

Hopefully people will not use paper anymore and we will have completely moved to a paperless society.

For scubadiving they will have found a way that you do not have to wear those heavy tanks anymore. Just a simple breathing apparatus that has unlimited oxygen supply. Diving suits will have been improvised so that you only need to wear something very thin against your skin and the material will keep you at an even temperature. I.e. whether it is warmer or colder water the temperature will stay the same inside the suit. So you only need one suit or a second one for backup.
edwinl
When I was 8yo, (20 years ago) used to imagine phones with directory address included because I hated to search a number when my mom forgot some contact information, I used to say "I wish one day phones will come with a mini address book inside".

Some years after I saw the first mobile phone and yelled finally someone heard me lol.

So for the next years I wish we will be able to travel to other planets, I believe we are using the wrong vehicle to travel across the universe, maybe we are trying to go from one island to another using a "bike", and we still developing the bike, but as much as we can develope a bike it wont be apropiate to travel across the sea.

Maybe some day the apropiate vehicle will be developed to travel across the universe Smile
pinkie
lol, i think it would be similar to the jetsons. 8-D
bonestorm74
I hope we have no more world hunger or poverty, and have stopped petty feudings over pieces of land.

I also hope medicine has advanced to cure cancer and other ailments that cannot currently be treated.

And I hope we have vehicles that run on water/air or some other substance - not petroleum products! Wouldn't that be nice.
gandalfthegrey
Two words:
Alien Invasion!!!

MUHAAA HAAAA!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Twisted Evil
edwinl
Should be cool to share life with alliens, just i wish their girls are sexier than our girls lol
ptfrances
It's too difficult to imagine the future because things are changing so quickly... Confused
gcaughill
brucedes wrote:
I also think we'll be seeing the increased accountability of politicians through the internet. I mean look at Burma. Despite the governments attempt to censor the net, it's getting through. This will help with the democratic process, I think.


If you look at China's efforts during the Olympics, they have 2.5 million+ people working to subvert free speech aka. security forces. Microphone's are everywhere etc, it may be the first Orwellian state. Very scary, I hope their efforts fail.
thejam
My guess,
The world is suffering from the consequences of our lifestyle today. Don't want to be a negative pain in the ass, but even if certain western countries (cause they have the availeble money/resources) can solve or at least stabilize some environmental issues, we still have huge growing nations who want at least the same some western countries have.
I really hope technology can keep up and is used wisely in the future. technology is the key to find harmony between high living standards of humans and a sustainable environment. Ow and Britney Spears is retro again Wink
imera
Many here has written a lot of positive and negative things, I don't know how the world will be but I hope it's still here.

Maybe the world will see that war doesn't solve anything, except maybe the population problem, but who would want to kill innocents?
If things goes in the wrong direction the line between poor and rich will be big, people will die because they don't have enough food or because they can't afford even simple medicine.
I hope the world is better then.

If it goes in a better way then maybe we can see more natural products, not many chemicals, and less things that hurts us and the environment. I don't think it's enough time to create flying cars and all that but maybe cars that is safer and better.

I'm not really religious but let's pray that people open their eyes and see that we are the number one threat to the world, then all the rest things
liljp617
Chris24 wrote:
There won't be a world in 100 years. The way we are destroying everything God gave us, nothing will be left except maybe a few rodents or roaches. Sorry to sound this way but, in my opinion the world has gone so far downhill that I don't see us recovering.


geeze...and "non-believers" have a pessimistic outlook on life? :O
Libby
qazwsx741 wrote:
what the world will be like in 100 years? Have you imagined in your mind?
I think the world will be like this.
1, we needn;t to use paper money, if we want something,we can go to the shop to fetch it without paying.


Maybe there won't be any money at all, like in the old book The News from Nowhere by William Morris. In that book, the main character wakes up 100 years in the future and finds himself in a place where capitalism is extinct, and anarchy reigns. It's a very pretty vision of what the world could be like.

In 100 years, oil and coal have probably run out for the most part, and probably many millions of people have died because of the resultant lack of access to food and water. (It takes gas to move those things to the cities remember). Probably people will be more spread out than before, because food won't be able to travel as far. I think people will get increasingly more polarized in their views, and there will be a lot of attempts at revolutions, whether fascist or anarchist or whatever.

I doubt that technology will save us because technology is basically driven by oil (it seems like it takes a lot of electricity and gas and wealth (wealth generated by fossil fuels, often) to make discoveries).

The most obvious and simplest (not easiest!) way to stop this is to use less oil and coal, but that basically means consuming less of almost everything. Voluntary poverty to prevent forced poverty.

Not too likely.
crabfish
Well I always thought the robots would replace us by now. Unfortunately we only have 'Roombas' running around our living room sucking up dirt.

And cell phones? don't get me started! When are cell phones (service in particular) going to be 100% operable?

Yes, we have progress, but we certainly have had some bumps along the way.
edwinl
I'd like to have robots that clean my room lol and should be grea to have robots that teach to poor people in countries where human teachers cant reach
vontero
With the approach of the year 2000, a sense of anticipation is sweeping the nation. All kinds of predictions are being made as to what life will be like in the new millennium. Will our computers survive the Y2K bug? Will our economy boom or bust? In many cases, it seems one guess is as good as another. Only time will prove which theory was correct.

When it comes to fire-rated glazing, however, there are some fairly safe bets as to what the future holds. By examining the latest trends in the industry, we can offer some fairly reliable forecasts about what lies ahead.

Prediction #1: Advanced Products
For example, based on the last two decades, we can conjecture that new product development will continue to redefine what is categorized as fire-rated glass. Twenty years ago, the process of choosing a fire-rated product was simple: Ask for wired glass. It was the only glass that met the code requirements. In fact, it defined the codes, because there was no other alternative. Fire officials, architects and glaziers all knew exactly what to expect from polished wired glass.

But much has changed in twenty years. Today, there are many products on the market besides wired glass. The introduction of different materials such as ceramics, intumescents, special films, coatings and laminates has literally exploded the field of fire-rated glass. Not only are there products that surpass the fire protection of wired glass, they can also offer:

* high impact safety ( CPSC 16CFR1201, Cat. II)
* sound reduction
* design potential (etching, sandblasting)
* privacy (obscured surfaces)
* one-way visibility (mirrored)
* energy efficiency (insulated units with Low-E and/or argon)
* heat transfer resistance

Architects can find a product that specifically meets a unique combination of requirements. With the advancement of manufacturing technology, such developments can only be expected to continue well into the future.

Prediction #2: Greater Caution
As exciting as all the new possibilities are, they do mean paying closer attention to product selection and installation. In the new generation of fire-rated glass, no two products are exactly the same. They don't all carry the same ratings. They don't all offer the same characteristics. And they can't all be installed in the same sizes. Generically specifying "fire-rated glass" will no longer suffice: Architects and glaziers need to familiarize themselves with the differences between the options.

For instance, one relatively new tempered product on the market claims a 60 minute fire rating. To the casual observer, it would seem to be comparable to other 60 minute products, such as ceramics. However, the tempered product cannot withstand the hose stream test - a mandatory requirement of 60 minute test standards. Should water from a sprinkler or fire hose come in contact with the tempered glass while it is hot from a fire (well under 60 minutes), the product may shatter and fall out of the frame, leaving no protection at all.

What's more, the tempered glass product has a coating on one side which must face the anticipated direction of the fire. Since no one knows when or where a fire may strike, relying on such a product may be questionable. So as you can see, all parties involved in specifying and installing fire-rated glazing must examine all the pros and cons of each product before making a selection.

This extra degree of caution is critical for life safety and for avoiding liability as well. In case after case across the country, it is becoming evident that everyone involved in the design and construction process will be held responsible for any mistakes that are made. Rather than simply looking for the lowest quote, glaziers can provide an invaluable service to architects and general contractors by questioning specifications they feel may not be appropriate. A little caution up front may save costly legal battles down the road.

Prediction #3: Stricter Codes
With the dawn of the new millennium, code requirements across the country are being standardized and updated to conform with international guidelines. The goal is to have a universal system, so that whether you're in a city such as Seattle or Chicago or Miami, you'll be meeting the same codes. The processes are now underway to make this vision a reality in the near future.

In all likelihood, what that will mean for fire codes is that the more stringent guidelines will be adopted as the benchmark. As an example, the hose stream test mentioned earlier has been a requirement nationally for glass to earn a rating of 45 minutes or greater. In 1998, the Southern Building Code Congress International (the governing body for building codes in Southeastern United States), voted to make the hose stream test mandatory for all fire-rated glass in their jurisdiction - whatever the rating. Since this is also the policy of our neighbors in Canada, it is probably safe to assume that the change will become national in 2000. Products currently on the market that cannot pass the hose stream test could see their fire-rated status in jeopardy should such a change occur.

Codes will continue to demand higher levels of product performance as new technology makes it possible for glass to comply. At the same time, codes are becoming less restrictive regarding the size of the glass allowed. While 1,296 square inches used to be the maximum fire-rated glass lite, new products on the market have proven that they can perform just as well in much larger sizes, and the codes have adapted accordingly.

Prediction #4: Increased Redundancies
You may have noticed the news stories in the past year regarding sprinkler failures. It turns out that one of the most popular sprinkler systems has had a failure rate of close to 40%. That means that millions of defective sprinklers will need to be replaced or repaired. The situation has made clear the danger of relying exclusively on sprinkler systems for fire protection.

You may not have heard that the same sprinkler company has also tested what they call a "deluge" sprinkler system, specifically designed to bathe window glass in the event of a fire and eliminate the need for any type of fire-rated glass in the opening. In theory, it sounds good: Keep glass cool with water, and it will stay in place. But in real life, such a heavy dependence on sprinklers could pose a serious threat to safety.

There are several reasons for this. First, if sprinklers do not activate quickly enough, ordinary glass will shatter as soon as the water touches it, leaving no protection in the opening at all. Secondly, in order to work properly, the sprinklers have to bathe the glass entirely and evenly. Any drapes, blinds or objects that interfere with the water will cause system failure. Finally, since sprinklers are "active" systems, they require a number of factors to operate smoothly. If for whatever reason they don't activate, regular tempered glass will not offer the necessary protection.

This does not mean sprinklers are bad - they're very good. They regularly save lives. But they should be used in conjunction with fire-rated glass - not in place of it. Fire code officials will tell you their are three types of fire protection: Detection, suppression and compartmentation. The best safety measures include all three, providing a certain amount of redundancy. Sprinklers can help with suppression, but they do nothing for compartmentation, which is the job of fire-rated glass. Future safety efforts will emphasize the need for comprehensive fire protection that doesn't depend solely on one particular element.

What do all these predictions mean? Here are some practical suggestions.

1. Develop a relationship with reputable sources in the fire-rated glass industry.
Unless you spend all your time studying the latest products and code developments, it's difficult to keep track of the constant changes that are happening. However, a five minute phone call to an industry specialist can save you hours of searching on your own. There are also tools and web sites available that let you compare a broad range of products side by side.

2. Exercise your responsibility as an expert.
You may be one of the last defenses against a poor specification. As stated earlier, you can make yourself an indispensable ally to architects by pointing out questionable product choices and recommending viable alternatives.

3. Be future-minded.
Never assume that what you knew about fire-rated glazing yesterday will be the same tomorrow. Always ask a manufacturer for the latest product listings and literature before finalizing any order.

No one can say for certain what tomorrow will hold - whether you're talking about computers crashing or fire-rated glass. But by keeping a wary eye on all the developments, you'll be better prepared for whatever the future may bring.
edwinl
How about to travel to moon like we fly in an airplane actually Wink
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