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give some ideas for partition scheme ~ please Close~






Which option should i consider in post below?
Option 1
50%
 50%  [ 1 ]
Option 2
50%
 50%  [ 1 ]
Total Votes : 2

hunnyhiteshseth
Let me start with a little background first:-

I have a 40GB HDD with win98 & winXP on it in 2 drives. Both drives have about 1 GB free space. Now I need Red Hat 9 also for my college work which obviously my current HDD cant support.
So, I am thinking of purchasing 160GB HDD & installing linux on it.

But for windows now I have 2 options:-

1) Leave 40GB as it is but move its temporary folder and swap file on new HDD which is obviously faster than old one. So that it gives performance boost.

2) Clone old HDD to new HDD & give swap and temporary files on old HDD. It will make programs & files on new HDD faster but obviously swap and temporary files slow.

So, what do you suggest?



P.S. I think it will depend on what files are accessed more: swap file + temporary files OR windows + program files
EdgeHawk
hunnyhiteshseth wrote:
Let me start with a little background first:-

I have a 40GB HDD with win98 & winXP on it in 2 drives. Both drives have about 1 GB free space. Now I need Red Hat 9 also for my college work which obviously my current HDD cant support.
So, I am thinking of purchasing 160GB HDD & installing linux on it.

But for windows now I have 2 options:-

1) Leave 40GB as it is but move its temporary folder and swap file on new HDD which is obviously faster than old one. So that it gives performance boost.

2) Clone old HDD to new HDD & give swap and temporary files on old HDD. It will make programs & files on new HDD faster but obviously swap and temporary files slow.

So, what do you suggest?



P.S. I think it will depend on what files are accessed more: swap file + temporary files OR windows + program files


- First Reinstall Windows on you new faster drive.
Make an extra partition for swap-file. If you like.
- Then install Linux on your new drive (dual boot)
Linux will take care of all the Lunux partitions and mount the Windows partitions.

Use your old drive for backups or temp-files.
hunnyhiteshseth
EdgeHawk wrote:

- First Reinstall Windows on you new faster drive.
Make an extra partition for swap-file. If you like.
- Then install Linux on your new drive (dual boot)
Linux will take care of all the Lunux partitions and mount the Windows partitions.

Use your old drive for backups or temp-files.


Reinstalling windows is out of question because reinstalling windows will mean reinstalling all drivers, applications, patches, updates, my personal settings etc. etc
JayBee
But without reinstalling windows? You can't just copy them to the new hard drive. It will not work.

1) my experience with swap file:
I have 512MB RAM, 512MB swap partition, Gentoo Linux with Xfce desktop environment.
When I work on my computer and running together Firefox (web browser with 20 opened tabs), Amarok (media player playing some music), Pidgin (instant messenger), Open Office (office suite with some document opened), some Terminal emulator I have still 190MB free RAM memory (320MB used) and swap is still free (0MB used).
Arrow So, it don't care if swap is on slow or fast hard drive even it is not used (in my case).
(You should also put your windows swap file to Linux swap partition to save some space)

2) my advice to using many hard drives:
I prefer to use only one hard drive (with exception you want some RAID practice), because it is more silent and it consumes less energy. So just sell the old one to somebody Wink
hunnyhiteshseth
JayBee wrote:
But without reinstalling windows? You can't just copy them to the new hard drive. It will not work.

1) my experience with swap file:
I have 512MB RAM, 512MB swap partition, Gentoo Linux with Xfce desktop environment.
When I work on my computer and running together Firefox (web browser with 20 opened tabs), Amarok (media player playing some music), Pidgin (instant messenger), Open Office (office suite with some document opened), some Terminal emulator I have still 190MB free RAM memory (320MB used) and swap is still free (0MB used).
Arrow So, it don't care if swap is on slow or fast hard drive even it is not used (in my case).
(You should also put your windows swap file to Linux swap partition to save some space)

2) my advice to using many hard drives:
I prefer to use only one hard drive (with exception you want some RAID practice), because it is more silent and it consumes less energy. So just sell the old one to somebody Wink


First of all, let me tell you cloning a drive is possible. If I copy at lowest-level by copying bitwise image of HDD it is possible. There are many free & commercial softwares available. Partition Magic is one of them & others also exist.
Secondly, my requirements are a bit more. I heavily multitask & my 512MB is easily filled The minimum I achieve in normal routine is 412MB, so speed is a factor for me.
Thirdly, I dont think you can share a partition for both linux swap partition & windows swap file. If it is possible, then please tell me how??
JayBee
hunnyhiteshseth wrote:
First of all, let me tell you cloning a drive is possible. If I copy at lowest-level by copying bitwise image of HDD it is possible. There are many free & commercial softwares available. Partition Magic is one of them & others also exist.
Secondly, my requirements are a bit more. I heavily multitask & my 512MB is easily filled The minimum I achieve in normal routine is 412MB, so speed is a factor for me.
Thirdly, I dont think you can share a partition for both linux swap partition & windows swap file. If it is possible, then please tell me how??


I know, that you can clone your hard drive, but I don't know, how could it works if you clone drives with different size. But it should not be problem as you say.

I also heavily multitask, but I have tuned system Razz OK, I don't play games.

You can mount swap in windows by this SwapFS driver. Than only put your swap file on this drive.
Quote:
SwapFs is a driver for Windows NT/2000/XP that let you use a Linux swap partition for temporary storage, like a RAM-disk. It is possible to put Windows page file on it. It is implemented as a disk filter driver.
http://www.acc.umu.se/~bosse/

I use it in windows, but I didn't use windows for a long months, so I don't know if it is fast enough.
hunnyhiteshseth
JayBee wrote:

You can mount swap in windows by this SwapFS driver. Than only put your swap file on this drive.


Wow, thanks for that. I will try this. I will test speed of the driver, and update you about the progress.
infinisa
Hi hunnyhiteshseth

I have had a very similar experience of upgrading to a larger disk, only in my case I already had Red Hat Linux installed on the old disk.

You don't mention how your 40GB disk is partitioned, but as I'm sure you know, the PC BIOS can't boot from a partition that starts more than 8GB from the start of the disk. The way round this is to use the capability of choosing which partition to boot from offered by the boot function of several operating systems, notably Linux and Windows XP.

Another thing to bear in mind is that Windows 98 gets confused when there is more than one primary (Windows) partition.

So my advice is the following:
1. Create a Linux (Ext3) primary partition of 100MB right at the start of the new disk (which you will make into the Linux /boot partition when you install Linux).
2. Clone the Windows XP partition from your old disk to a primary partition on your new disk, right after the Linux partition. This would be a good time to make the partition larger.
3. Make the rest of the disk into an Extended partition
4. Clone the Windows 98 partition from your old disk to a logical partition at the start of the extended partition on your new disk.
5. Once everything is working OK, put your old disk away safely as a backup.
6. If your new disk is SATA, and if the BIOS supports RAID, you install an identical 160GB and configure mirroring, which will give you fault tolerance (i.e., if one disk fails, you don’t loose any data and your machine carries on working as if nothing had happened!)

You now have plenty of free space on your extended partition to partition as you wish, and after installing Linux will be able to choose Linux or Win XP as your active partition, as either system allows you to boot the other one plus Win 98. (If you need help on this, just ask).

As far as partitioning tools are concerned, when you get to this level of sophistication, I highly recommend purchasing Norton Partition Magic.

If this is not an option, then I can recommend Ranish partition manager at http://www.ranish.com/part/, often supplied with Linux distributions.

Hope this is of help.
hunnyhiteshseth
infinisa wrote:
Hi hunnyhiteshseth

I have had a very similar experience of upgrading to a larger disk, only in my case I already had Red Hat Linux installed on the old disk.

You don't mention how your 40GB disk is partitioned, but as I'm sure you know, the PC BIOS can't boot from a partition that starts more than 8GB from the start of the disk. The way round this is to use the capability of choosing which partition to boot from offered by the boot function of several operating systems, notably Linux and Windows XP.

Another thing to bear in mind is that Windows 98 gets confused when there is more than one primary (Windows) partition.

So my advice is the following:
1. Create a Linux (Ext3) primary partition of 100MB right at the start of the new disk (which you will make into the Linux /boot partition when you install Linux).
2. Clone the Windows XP partition from your old disk to a primary partition on your new disk, right after the Linux partition. This would be a good time to make the partition larger.
3. Make the rest of the disk into an Extended partition
4. Clone the Windows 98 partition from your old disk to a logical partition at the start of the extended partition on your new disk.
5. Once everything is working OK, put your old disk away safely as a backup.
6. If your new disk is SATA, and if the BIOS supports RAID, you install an identical 160GB and configure mirroring, which will give you fault tolerance (i.e., if one disk fails, you don’t loose any data and your machine carries on working as if nothing had happened!)

You now have plenty of free space on your extended partition to partition as you wish, and after installing Linux will be able to choose Linux or Win XP as your active partition, as either system allows you to boot the other one plus Win 98. (If you need help on this, just ask).

As far as partitioning tools are concerned, when you get to this level of sophistication, I highly recommend purchasing Norton Partition Magic.

If this is not an option, then I can recommend Ranish partition manager at http://www.ranish.com/part/, often supplied with Linux distributions.

Hope this is of help.


Thanks man. I think you suggested the most appropriate configuration, it is just perfect & covers all my problems.
Thanks again.
rvec
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