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kernel compile





teko
Hi, I wanted to try compiling a linux kernel. I'm running ubuntu and am following a guide on how to do this on the ubuntu forums.

I'm running it on a dell inspiron 8000 PIII laptop with 389MB of RAM, how long will it take to compile the kernel? I'm imagining it will be pretty slow but would it be finished if I left it running over night?

Now where they seem to lack a bit in detail is regarding the "make xconfig" stage where you have to say what support the kernel will have for your hardware. Whats the best way to go about this? Select everything for the first time and then remove bits piece by piece?

Or else just remove what I think I wont definitely need?

Is there any guides on this on the net anywhere? Also it gives me the option to either enable it or have it as a module whats the difference?
AftershockVibe
You might want to check out the Gentoo starters guide. The general idea of Gentoo is that you configure your entire kernel from scratch.

Remember that anything you have on top of your kernel is not guaranteed (in some cases not even likely) to work. This is especially for anything driver-like. NVidia drivers are going to need recompiling.

Don't expect the rest of your Ubuntu installation to just work happily as it did before.

http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/
fiendskull9
if your interested in using your own kernel, it would be best to just avoid ubuntu...

Ubuntu uses many many many patches to even keep their flavor of linux running

compiling my gentoo kernel on my p3 laptop with 128mb ram took around 45 minutes

this process takes roughly around 15 on my p4 desktop with 1 gb ram

-clay
teko
thanks for that, I´ve been also looking at linux from scratch and gentoo. I´m just SLOWLY making my way through the documentation before I start.

45 mins sounds great for a kerenl compile, I tried it last night but after 3 hours I called it a night and it was finished when I checked it this morning so I´ve no idea of how long it took I also realised there is a lot of filesystem and networking stuff that I could leave out of the compile so that will probably speed things up.
djclue917
Yeah, better avoid Ubuntu if you really want to experience the "joy" of kernel compilation. Very Happy
In addition to Linux From Scratch (LFS) and Gentoo, you might also want to try Arch Linux. I have been using it for more than a year now and I've been really satisfied with how things are going. Also, Arch is a binary-based distribution, however, you can easily build your own custom packages using the Arch Build System (ABS). I've already built a custom kernel before (linux 2.6.22.1 + -ck patchset I think.) using Arch. Anyway, you have a lot of options so don't hesitate on recompiling the kernel. Wink
myrevolt
45 minutes is a lie, maybe the kernel by itself. To be fully up and usable it took 40 hours of compiling (gnome and various apps included) Gentoo on my PIII 800MHz w/ 256mb RAM. Kororaa is nice, but will uses a vanilla kernel. Best of luck, expect to have a lot of downtime, keep a copy of Knoppix handy (you may even want to chroot into a Gentoo install especially if you only have access to a wifi connection), and you may consider having access to another computer nearby to look up any problems you may encounter along the way (or simply referring to the handbook).
coreymanshack
This is very interesting, I am also getting into the LFS, and I was wondering why it has to be done from a working linux distro? I thought it was Linux from scratch, not linux from other linux
teko
coreymanshack wrote:
This is very interesting, I am also getting into the LFS, and I was wondering why it has to be done from a working linux distro? I thought it was Linux from scratch, not linux from other linux


as far as I know you need another linux system to build the distribution. Its a distribution that you are building from scratch. correct me if I´m wrong people!
AftershockVibe
You need a very basic OS which will run your compiler.

Things like Gentoo and presumably LFS (I've never used it) will boot from the CD and install this for you.
fiendskull9
myrevolt wrote:
45 minutes is a lie, maybe the kernel by itself. To be fully up and usable it took 40 hours of compiling (gnome and various apps included) Gentoo on my PIII 800MHz w/ 256mb RAM. Kororaa is nice, but will uses a vanilla kernel. Best of luck, expect to have a lot of downtime, keep a copy of Knoppix handy (you may even want to chroot into a Gentoo install especially if you only have access to a wifi connection), and you may consider having access to another computer nearby to look up any problems you may encounter along the way (or simply referring to the handbook).


Quote:
compiling my gentoo ____kernel____ on my p3 laptop with 128mb ram took around 45 minutes


exactly

the kernel manages the system's resources (the communication between hardware and software components) and its the lowest abstraction layer between hardware and software

gnome is not party of the linux kernel...

-clay
coreymanshack
AftershockVibe wrote:
You need a very basic OS which will run your compiler.

Things like Gentoo and presumably LFS (I've never used it) will boot from the CD and install this for you.


Oh ok, so I doesn't actually use files from the operating system you are in. You just need a compiler.
fiendskull9
yes
its much like gentoo

you use their enviroment for getting everything usable, and then chrooting into it (so its acting like you are booted into your new shell) and then configuring so you can actually cd'less boot...

-clay
infobankr
Compiling your own kernel with ubuntu is fine - and there are some great tools from debian for making it a smap. Check out this page:

http://www.debian.org/doc/manuals/reference/ch-kernel.en.html

I believe it will apply to ubuntu as well.

Gentoo is a terrific distro too, and using it will teach you a lot about linux.
teko
myrevolt wrote:
45 minutes is a lie, maybe the kernel by itself. To be fully up and usable it took 40 hours of compiling (gnome and various apps included) Gentoo on my PIII 800MHz w/ 256mb RAM.


So after 40hours of compiling was the end result worth it? Was the system running faster compared to a package based distribution you would have installed?

I dont mind putting in the time or even the overall performance is not that much better, I think I will learn alot more doing things going the gentoo/lfs way.
JayBee
infobankr wrote:
Gentoo is a terrific distro too, and using it will teach you a lot about linux.

Yes it is. With gentoo is everything prepared to compile your kernel.

AMD @ 1600MHz, 512MB RAM -> compiling kernel took about 20min
teko
Just started the gentoo install yesterday and was amazed how straightforward it was. I should have tried it sooner. I only have a base system installed and need to install KDE etc which will probably take alot more time.

The kernel compiled in around 15 minutes which really impressed me. I have a few little problems with the network not coming up after a reboot, and the /boot partition not mounting properly but I'm sure I'll get that sorted out. Also the Gentoo forums are really great, lots of great help there.
simplyw00x
Quote:
I dont mind putting in the time or even the overall performance is not that much better, I think I will learn alot more doing things going the gentoo/lfs way.

I don't mind putting in the hours if it gives me something to do and an excuse not to be doing work and to leave my computer on to finish my torrents Very Happy
teko
well this is my first post from a newly compiled gentoo system. Still have a lot of issues to try and get sorted but am happier to do it this way.
infobankr
Congrats teko, I bet you will really enjoy your gentoo experience! It is a great way to learn about linux.

Portage is nice, especially since it uses rsync. I used to use gentoo for all my systems, but then I switched to debian, which is now my #1 favorite of all time.
teko
infobankr wrote:
Congrats teko, I bet you will really enjoy your gentoo experience! It is a great way to learn about linux.

Portage is nice, especially since it uses rsync. I used to use gentoo for all my systems, but then I switched to debian, which is now my #1 favorite of all time.


well I'm enjoying but its tough work, also I'm not sure how viable gentoo is on a PIII system. It takes ages to update the system as everything needs to be compiled again. I think I will set it up for the time being and leave it for a while. Other than that I might change to another package based system. I was on Ubuntu but wanted to learn more. I think I might head back to debian now after I'm a bit more comfortable with linux
mehulved
teko wrote:
well I'm enjoying but its tough work, also I'm not sure how viable gentoo is on a PIII system. It takes ages to update the system as everything needs to be compiled again.
You may consider sabayon linux instead, which is based on gentoo but has a binary package manager too. But, I am not sure on how good the binary package manager is.
teko
sabayon linux? have'nt heard of it but will take a look. The other interesting as already mentioned is arch linux which is built for intel systems so that sounds interesting.
vicarious
I used to think that Ubuntu was a ¨dumbed" down Linux distribution that would cause me a lot of problems when it came to things such as Kernel compilation and configuration specific functions also, but after a few years on my current Ubuntu system, I have found that there is very little to stand in the way of even the most advance users needs if they are familiar with debian based systems. Some things in Ubuntu are made to be so simple, that in a Windows world, IT HAS to bring with it the same problems that simplicity has brought to the rest of the computing world, right? On this ¨fact" I have been proven wrong time and time again. I have heard that you can never really be in root, simply sudo, try typing sudo -i in your CLI and you will get a pass prompt and then be placed into a root CLI. simply bring up any program you wish, and it will have root access. feel like staying away from Ubunuized applications? Use .deb s from the Debian repository or get the source and compile it yourself. I use Linux and Linux only on my home computers, and I use Ubuntu on all of them now. As an ex Slax user, I could´t be more geeky, but I have been very impressed with Ubuntu, especially in the areas of gaining new users, and on time updates. I feel that a distro is a distro anymore, after using hundreds. Customer support, updates, and of course package management are about the only things that divide the pack, and with a very large Debian community, as well as a groundswell user base of Ubuntu itself, free customer support is in abundance (If you like 24/7 phone support you can pay per incident using CS companies, or you might want to go with a commercial distro such as RedHat or SuSe). Updates are one area where Ubuntu has also impressed me. 6 month distro updates and recurring software updates (what you call patches, I call preemptive security, which we all know MS is really bad at) is a reality when you have several developers interested in making your stable, free product even more rock solid. And as for package management I have fallen in love with apt-get, and Synaptic makes this even dreamier.

Best of luck with any distro you may choose . I like the hands on approach Gentoo promotes. A super choice for someone who is in need to know what is going on in the back end
teko
Your right, I think Ubuntu is a great linux system and has done wonderful thing to promote linux. Like its a system you could install and your mother could use it. I think this is important.

However as a next step in understanding linux and Unix operating systems I wanted to try a linux system that didnt do everything for you so thats why I started to play around with Gentoo. Anyway I think I´ll stick it out with gentoo for a while, got my wireless adapter working so thats probably the main stumbling block out of the way!
mehulved
vicarious wrote:
I used to think that Ubuntu was a ¨dumbed" down Linux distribution that would cause me a lot of problems when it came to things such as Kernel compilation and configuration specific functions also,

Eh. Kernel compilation will be the same reguardless of the distro. Cos after all it is linux, uses the same kernel and same toolchain and stuff as any other linux. Smile
Only thing different is that you debianise the kernel and it's modules after compilation for better package mangement.
Well it will be similar for any rpm based system too, where you'd make an RPM of it after compiling.
vicarious wrote:
Best of luck with any distro you may choose . I like the hands on approach Gentoo promotes. A super choice for someone who is in need to know what is going on in the back end
Getting to a distro war Razz
vicarious
No distro wars started here. Although I do think that Tomś bootdisk is the best lol.
teko
Please dont blame for starting any wars! Very Happy I think every distro has its positives and have learned something new from working with each one I´ve tried.
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