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Clocks goes faster down





Kovsieassassins
A friend of mine said that when he was small his parents froced him to take piano lessons and practice for a hour a day. So he only practiced from 3:00 to 3:30 and again from 4 to 4:30, as he was convinced that time goes faster when the minute arm is going down.

Seem very logical for a child.
rvec
lol I also did things like that. But I have another theory behind it.

If you want to do something it takes a couple of min to get started. The more you have to get started the less time you have left to do the actual thing. So when I had to do homework for an hour it took me 6x10 min .
silverdown
I don't understand it, but I laughed even though I don't know why. Laughing
Kaisonic
It makes sense. Gravity pulls the arm downward, so time would go faster during the first half of the hour, and slower during the second half of the hour.

Of course, this is completely arbitrary, but aren't all child imaginations arbitrary?
HDirtwater
All I know is that if I spent half as much time actually practicing as I did finding ways to avoid it or trick my parents into thinking I was, I would be on tour with the philharmonic as we speak... Laughing
Indyan
They must have had a crappy clock. In any decent clock wont be affected by the weight of the limbs.
Btw, smart kid Laughing

Also it was very bad of his parents. Music cant be forced upon someone.
Donutey
I timed our school clocks (when I was very bored) in high school and the actual minutes were quite often not a minute long, but it varied equally up and down so it didn't matter in the end.
coreymanshack
Donutey wrote:
I timed our school clocks (when I was very bored) in high school and the actual minutes were quite often not a minute long, but it varied equally up and down so it didn't matter in the end.


Sounds like your school is nearly as boring as mine. I feel for you.
m-productions
pfff everyone knows thats not true...even if your a kid.... uggg.

If you want time to go by faster than it normaly would, dont look, then it speeds up on you, thats a proven fact!! FACT!!! Confused
Davidgr1200
I can also report that time goes faster as you get older
Bockman
Davidgr1200 wrote:
I can also report that time goes faster as you get older


Quoted for truth. And if you want an reason for that fact:

m-productions wrote:
If you want time to go by faster than it normaly would, dont look, then it speeds up on you, thats a proven fact!! FACT!!!


Seems that as we get older we can no longer find time to look at the time.. and he passes by (must admit i liked this phrase).

Be Well Cool
xkobram
Davidgr1200 wrote:
I can also report that time goes faster as you get older


I think in school the time goes slower and slower even if you are being older and older...
Aredon
Look into chronokinesis(crow-no-kin-esis).
My research tells me chronokinetic powers are nonexistent rather it is merely a state of consciousnesses in which your mind perceives time differently.
"Time flies when you're having fun."
A possible usage for chronokinesis is learning to read quicker.
An interesting article: Scientists prove time flies when you're busy

If you're interested in developing telekinetic and telepathic powers, look into PSI Qi balls. PSI balls are one of the most basic and fundamental challenges given to people learning to control PSI. They are created best when the body is in balance. Chinese Herbal Medicine, Acupuncture and Craniosacral Therapy specialize in putting the body back in balance. Before attempting a PSI ball, one should take classes in meditation, any should do, so one can reach the nonverbal state of mind. One of the benefits of meditation is that it allows one to pay more attention to change in their body. If there was no dark nor change in radiance of light then one wouldn't be conscious of light since they wouldn't feel any change. It works likewise for both light and dark. It also works that way with Qi(pronounced chi) to improve one's consciousnesses of their energy flow. Once one becomes conscious of their QI(energy) then there isn't really a need to reach the nonverbal state of mind for creating PSI balls since they will already feel the change of their energy flow however emotions do effect one's digestion and ability for the spleen to absorb the nutrients of their food and thus make one Qi deficient since emotion plays a large role in Qi creation. http://www.yinyanghouse.com/images/theory-qi.gif
Anger is one of the most important things to distance oneself from in order to put the body back in balance. Anger puts the liver out of balance thus making one even more short-fused only to become angered more easily -- catch 22. Over thinking puts the spleen out of balance so one doesn't absorb the nutrients their body needs thus making one Qi deficient which leads to depression and even more Qi deficiency -- another catch 22; Frequent sighs are a sign of Qi deficiency. Again the body works best when in balance (which also depends on the mind for balance). If you don't see the connection between mind and body, look into Proverbs:
Prolonged hope sickens the heart; desire fulfilled is a tree of life. 13:12
The words of a complainer are like blows, descending to the chambers of one's innards. 18:8
Enlightened eyes will gladden the heart; good news will fatten a bone. 15:30
Creating balls of QI aka PSI is only a step away once one is conscious of their energy. A natural at it can create a weak PSI ball within a few seconds. Qi is usually too diluted to actually be seen however when one gathers enough into a condensed area, it becomes visible according to how the mind forms it. Learning Qigong helps one "create" Qi so one can gather enough Qi before using it for such Qi-incompetent arts such as psychokinesis(telekensis) or pyrokensis; so it is a good idea to look into it if one is serious about developing telekinetic and telepathic powers. Kabbalah is also worth looking into for learning the actual science behind such powers. Try reading the back cover of Sefer Yetzirah on amazon.com.
It specifically mentions aiding the development of telekinetic and telepathic powers when understood properly.
GSIS
There's a sound psychological reason for time appearing to get faster as we get older.

When we're very young a given time span is a relatively large percentage of our lives. It seems to pass by slowly. As we get older that same time span becomes a much smaller percentage of our lives and, so, appears to go by much more quickly.

Also, grown-up life contains many distractions that prevent us from watching the clock. In general, tasks almost always take longer than we anticipate so when we do look at the clock we're surprised at how much time has gone by.

On clocks, a good escapement will run at an even speed whatever position the hands are in. Also, any decent clock will have a counterbalanced seconds hand (if there is a seconds hand). Without the counterbalance a large seconds hand can overpower the train (and escapement) causing it to run slightly faster on the right side of the dial, and slightly slower on the left. Similarly, with a battery powered clock as the battery finally expires the clock will almost always stop with the second hand on the left side of the dial (usually around the 40 seconds position). This is not often a problem if there is no seconds hand as the minute and hour hands do not have the torque to overpower the escapement through the gearing of the train.

This is also why seconds hands are usually very thin and light. A heavy hand requires a more powerful train and a better escapement.

So, a clock with an undersized escapement and underpowered train, relative to the needs of the dial, and an unbalanced seconds hand, can vary in speed the first 30 seconds of each minute running faster than the last 30 seconds. This would not substantially affect the length of each minute, though, so the pianist misled himself.

A very worn escapement can also cause this problem - to the point where the weight of an unbalanced seconds hand on its 'downhill run' can cause the escapement to run away and the teeth on the escape wheel to grind through the pallets on the escapement itself. If the pallets are harder than the wheel, the teeth on the wheel will be worn down or their tips bent over.
Nameless
m-productions wrote:
If you want time to go by faster than it normaly would, dont look, then it speeds up on you, thats a proven fact!! FACT!!! Confused


INTERPRETATION!!! actually.
ninjakannon
m-productions wrote:
If you want time to go by faster than it normaly would, dont look, then it speeds up on you, thats a proven fact!! FACT!!! Confused

Unless you can't stop thinking about looking up at the clock. Then it slows down even more! The way to do it is forget about time at all, then the activity will end once and for all.

About the problem; I think I have an explanation. During the first half an hour (3 - 3:30), when the minute arm is going down, he would have been practising for a relatively short amount of time therefore he would be less tired of it, less bored with it and generally more concentrated and thus look up at the clock less often. As a result of this time would appear to go quicker during this time.
Then he would have a half an hour break so as to avoid the longer half an hour. This half an hour would have appeared longer because he would be more bored, tired and would have been less concentrated and glance up at the clock more often.
So he had a break for the latter half of the hour. Because of his belief that time passes quicker in the first half of the hour he would then believe that it is again in his second half an hour. Furthermore, with the knowledge that he would be free at 4:30 time would likely pass quite quickly for him, at least until the last few minutes.
Backing up his theory that time went faster during the first half an hour would be the fact that during his break he would have the constant niggling though at the back of his mind that he would have to soon go back and practice again. Therefore time would seem to go past pretty slowly as he would keep glancing up at the clock.

Well, it was just a thought.


GSIS wrote:
When we're very young a given time span is a relatively large percentage of our lives. It seems to pass by slowly. As we get older that same time span becomes a much smaller percentage of our lives and, so, appears to go by much more quickly.

You are right. However I realised a way to change this.
I dislike the way time is continually speeding up (well, my perception of it is at any rate) so I wondered how I could stop it. What I do is take a few minutes to imagine everything that's happened to me during the past week or perhaps month (a month is probably the best one). What I find is that you realise just how much has happened, go on - try to think of every little thing you've done - there are thousands of things. This made me realise how time really isn't getting faster and changed my perception slightly. But it doesn't really stop the getting faster feeling unless you think like this a lot.

Did that make any sense at all? Razz
DSGamer3002
Nice logic, considering gravity would have something to do with it if the minute hand weren't screwed into the middle of the clock with the hour and second hands.
Captain Fertile
Davidgr1200 wrote:
I can also report that time goes faster as you get older


I laughed when I read the thread but then when I read the above statement I stopped laughing - it certainly does appear to be very true. Maybe something to do with relativity I guess when you get old you know your time is running out and the more you think of it the less time you find you have...

...oh another of those conversations you have about 2am after the fifth bottle of wine has been opened with a group of your best friends. Shocked
divinitywolf
LOL that'd be soo cool if the minute hand just raced downhill then struggled uphill.
That'd make people go so crazy.
missdixy
Lol. Seems very clever for a child.
ThornsOfSorrow
Captain Fertile wrote:
Davidgr1200 wrote:
I can also report that time goes faster as you get older


I laughed when I read the thread but then when I read the above statement I stopped laughing - it certainly does appear to be very true. Maybe something to do with relativity I guess when you get old you know your time is running out and the more you think of it the less time you find you have...

...oh another of those conversations you have about 2am after the fifth bottle of wine has been opened with a group of your best friends. Shocked


Although it could have something to do with the feeling of time running out, I think it has more to do with a fixed amount of time getting to be a smaller and smaller fraction out of the total time that a person has been alive. For example, for a six-year-old child, a year feels like forever because one year is one-sixth of that child's entire life. However, a year is nothing to a 50-year-old adult, because that year is only one-fiftieth of his or her life. At least that's how I see it.

And in regards to the original post (just so I'm not completely off-topic): I'd take that as a sign of intelligence in a child because, even though it's incorrect, it shows that he had a basic understanding of physics in regard to gravity, which is great for someone so young. Everyone understands physics at a gut level (at least), but for a child to actually try to apply that knowledge is just incredible. And there's never anything wrong with thinking outside the box like that. Very clever!
xorcist
That is really funny especially to tell a little kid that. They will believe it and most of them wont have any reasonable explanation. At first i thought this thread was saying that clocks go faster when its going down. I should try to tell that to my little brother and see what he says.
unknownc1c
haha interesting theory, too bad a lot of clocks are digital now Razz I bet clocks might go slightly faster going down, but that's probably just older clocks.... i don't know much about normal clocks, I always use digital ones haha.

I did things like rvec said, just taking longer to actually get started. When i had intruments lessons i'd talk for like the first 10 minutes lol.
ninjakannon
xorcist wrote:
That is really funny especially to tell a little kid that. They will believe it and most of them wont have any reasonable explanation. At first i thought this thread was saying that clocks go faster when its going down. I should try to tell that to my little brother and see what he says.

No one told the child that, he figured it out for himself - despite it being wrong (perhaps there is a fraction of a seconds difference, but none a human could notice).


ThornsOfSorrow wrote:
it shows that he had a basic understanding of physics in regard to gravity, which is great for someone so young.

Well, that depends on how you look at it. Perhaps he thought this because of a basic grasp of the idea of gravity but more likely I expect something more along the lines of what I said here.

With regards to everyone having a basic grasp of physics, well of course! This is not because you know of physics but merely because of what you have observed. When playing snooker / billiards or whatever you don't work out the angles or power to hit the ball in your head using maths but merely from past experience. Hence why practice makes perfect. Wink
ThornsOfSorrow
@ninjakannon: Hmm...I somehow missed your reply when I was skimming through the topic. You had a really good point though, and I completely agree that the first half of an hour does seem to go faster when doing something that one deems unpleasant. I can definitely relate to that, being a student who is always looking at the time during class and wondering why the last ten minutes take forever. Good thinking!
J-Evil
Lol reminds me of a clock in my history class back in highschool (it was only a few years ago BTW i'm not old or anything). anyways the second hand on the clock was sorta broken. It would go to the top and then just fall back down to 6 and stay there for 30 seconds then start climbing back to the top and repeating. was kind of funny IMO but it didnt really affect the rest of the clock (minute or hour hands)
gibbo
it would be so awsome if the logic behind it was true, although that could be why digital clocks keep the time better?
j_f_k
Indyan wrote:
They must have had a crappy clock. In any decent clock wont be affected by the weight of the limbs.
Btw, smart kid Laughing

Also it was very bad of his parents. Music cant be forced upon someone.



Maybe true - however all the JFK Jnrs want to play but don't want the effort of practising. Leaning the piano (or any musical instrument for that matter) is seriously hard work. As long as the kid wants to play they should be made to practice as this instills the discipline needed to become good.

If the kid isn't interested in music then yes indeed its a bad thing to force them to play.
Soulfire
Did you know that moving around slows aging?

Let's say two people are in a room. Person A is pacing around the room, and Person B is just sittinf down. Person A is aging less quickly than Person B; granted, the differences are really unnoticeable, I just think it's an interesting concept.
reddishblue
It wouldn't work.

Gravity is a very, very weak force, in fact, on Earth it is the weakest of all forces from what I have read.

Just look at a toy magnet, with a very weak magnetic pull, it is still capable of pulling filled metal from a desk, which with all of the gravity on Earth pulling it down, it still goes up with unmeasurable ease, it wouldn't be able to pull down a reinforced clock hand, one controlled by gears at that.

I don't think you would get any difference at all regardless of where the hand is at the time, another mistake that seems to be taking place is the idea that the clock hand goes down at a constant speed, without stopping. While I believe that there are clocks out there that do this, it is very uncommon, and I'm talking about minute or hour hands here, I am aware of second hands that do not stop.

Another simular idea I have encountered is the idea that those on the ground age slower (consmetically speaking) then those in high buildings, while this is *sigh* true, the difference, as I saw, over an entire lifetime is around 0.000002 seconds of seperation, I bet even high in the atmosphere it wouldn't be much more.

Let's not talk about Jupiter though!

---Reddish
Seiji
Never bothered to examine the clock while I'm at school. But I noticed on weekends time seems to fly by but on a school day every is going slow. Buts that for everyone heh?
ninjakannon
reddishblue wrote:
It wouldn't work.

Gravity is a very, very weak force, in fact, on Earth it is the weakest of all forces from what I have read.

Just look at a toy magnet, with a very weak magnetic pull, it is still capable of pulling filled metal from a desk, which with all of the gravity on Earth pulling it down, it still goes up with unmeasurable ease, it wouldn't be able to pull down a reinforced clock hand, one controlled by gears at that.

A magnet that is, say, a cube and has a size of 1cm cubed could attract a few screws or something, nothing much larger. A huge magnet, perhaps one of those electromagnets designed to lift cars and such is far stronger. In both cases they are lifting something far larger than themselves; relatively then they are pretty strong.
Other forces too appear powerful, perhaps more so than gravity. But remember that the earth is very, very large and has a huge mass. Therefore, it has a greater effect on objects on earth (and within its gravitational field, take the orbiting Moon for example) than any of these other forces than you might realise. No matter how quickly you propel upwards something you just won't be able to stop it from falling back down again (unless, of course, you use huge rockets).

So, my point, while I cannot disagree with you that gravity may be a relatively weak force. But the clock will be affected, just not enough for us to humanly notice.
The hands cannot be pulled down (by any amount noticeable - but perhaps enough effect is had to change the time the clock shows by a minute a month, or a minute a year depending on the clock?) because the mechanism inside the clock turns its hands and would be under the same force from gravity whether the hands were going up or down.

Just as an endnote. Gravity creates a force of acceleration equal to 9.81 ms^-2 (9.81 meters per second per second). That's pretty strong, isn't it? I'm interested in what you say.

Look at what I wrote here, ThornsOfSorrow seemed to think it was plausible - I think that's really what was going on.
reddishblue
I'm assuming that the 9.81 ms^-2 (9.81 meters per second per second) is a freefall speed?
That is strong, and I have to admit that, but the fact is, and I hope this makes sense, it is the sole force affecting said object, as in, if it was metalic, and nearby was a powerful electromagnet regardless of the speed gravity is pulling, the object would still be attracted to the magnet over being pulled by gravity.

Of course it would need to be a strong magnet, since the object would be moving fast enough to simply skip by the magnet and not give it enough time to connect. Although, I think if it's strong, enough, even that wouldn't happen.

Sadly, I don't know if any of this is correct, as it's all just theories really, and a little reading on the subject, and you are more qualified to make judgements on these ideas then I am.

Maybe you are right about the minute a year, but I believe most clocks should be powerful enough to hold their own against gravities pull, otherwise the mechanics inside may be unsuitable for timekeeping althogether, the clock should be able to control it's self well enough that times are always measured accurately, and if they can't handle gravity without giving up measurable time, then they are clearly not sound enough to keep judging lengths of time anyway.
I sure hope you understood that.

Reddish
Chelissamow
Heh, that's cute. I wish that'd happen for a digital clock.
ninjakannon
reddishblue wrote:
I'm assuming that the 9.81 ms^-2 (9.81 meters per second per second) is a freefall speed?

Yes, it's the acceleration you will undergo when in freefall.

reddishblue wrote:
That is strong, and I have to admit that, but the fact is, and I hope this makes sense, it is the sole force affecting said object, as in, if it was metalic, and nearby was a powerful electromagnet regardless of the speed gravity is pulling, the object would still be attracted to the magnet over being pulled by gravity.

Of course it would need to be a strong magnet, since the object would be moving fast enough to simply skip by the magnet and not give it enough time to connect. Although, I think if it's strong, enough, even that wouldn't happen.

Of course if you had a strong enough magnet the object would be pulled in. It would be interesting to see just how strong the magnet would have to be while the falling object was at terminal velocity. Would it have to be proportionally stronger than gravity? I have no idea, and I couldn't test this either - proper equipment is needed! Would be interesting though.

reddishblue wrote:
and you are more qualified to make judgements on these ideas then I am.

Oh I don't know about that, I study physics but I'm no scientist. Wink

reddishblue wrote:
Maybe you are right about the minute a year, but I believe most clocks should be powerful enough to hold their own against gravities pull, otherwise the mechanics inside may be unsuitable for timekeeping althogether, the clock should be able to control it's self well enough that times are always measured accurately, and if they can't handle gravity without giving up measurable time, then they are clearly not sound enough to keep judging lengths of time anyway.
I sure hope you understood that.

I would expect an ordinary clock to be minutely affected by gravity but not much at all. I still think this makes them suitable for timekeeping though; after all - they're more accurate than you or I could be if we counted the seconds. Imagine if you threw a clock to and fro with a friend (but, hypothetically, caught it without knocking it about but very gently) for 24 hours, I would expect the forces acting on it to change the time it shows a little. I'm not sure how much by though.
The most accurate clocks these days are those atomic clocks... I just searched Google to see if I could find anything specific. Read this. I would say that's pretty accurate, wouldn't you?
Blaster
It is pretty smart for a kid to think something like that. that i must say is pretty awesome. I would never of thought that as a kid. I wouldn't of even thought of it as an adult Razz
watersoul
Hmm, I hope it's true, think I'm going to turn my clock upside down every half hour and see if it makes a difference when I'm working Lol

...seriously though, aren't kid's concepts of the world great - it was all so simple when we didn't know the details Smile
Davidgr1200
GSIS, I completely agree with you. There is, however, one foolproof way to make time go slower: visit the dentist for some fillings or wisdom-teeth extractions!

To those who are uncertain about GSIS explanation compare the following scenario as seen by a boy and as seen by his father:

BOY:
Mother calls: "Dinner's ready"
Boy runs in eats his dinner and then goes back to his computer.

FATHER:
Wife calls: "Can you keep an eye on the rice and turn it down when it boils"
Father watches rice and turns it down when it boils. Turns it up again a bit afterwards to keep it boiling. Eventually it's ready. He lays the table whilst his wife goes and calls the sun to dinner.
He eats his dinner, talks to his wife for a few minutes and then does the washing up.
Wife calls "Can you take this rubbish out to the dustbin, and then pay the electricity bill"
Father does this. Father then goes to the computer.

RESULTS:
5 minutes of the boy's free time has vanished because of dinner.
40 minutes of the father's free time has vanished because of dinner.
Thus the father has less free time left. After the boy has eaten dinner it is 5 past six, after the father has eaten dinner it is perhaps half past six. Thus time has gone much faster for the father.
Lukero
Even if it was the work of gravity the difference wouldn't be that much.
ninjakannon
Davidgr1200 wrote:
GSIS, I completely agree with you...

...After the boy has eaten dinner it is 5 past six, after the father has eaten dinner it is perhaps half past six. Thus time has gone much faster for the father.

I'm afraid your examples don't make sense.

There's the fact that not everyone follows the stereotypes you described - thus meaning that there are in fact many people who are the exact opposite of what you've described and yet still realise the same phenomenon. Aside from that, I think you'll find that time passes far quicker when you're sitting in front of a computer (at least for most people) than when you are doing things.
Why is this? Because you lose your perception of time. It's much easier to gage time while you're doing things, especially a variety of things.

So yeah, I'm just saying that your explanation wasn't very good.

This:
GSIS wrote:
When we're very young a given time span is a relatively large percentage of our lives. It seems to pass by slowly. As we get older that same time span becomes a much smaller percentage of our lives and, so, appears to go by much more quickly.

Is true. The following paragraph is far less true - I think you'll find that very soon in life you'll have just as many distractions as when you're an adult. Yet your perception of time will continue to speed up.

The rest is not relevant to this post.

Read what I said earlier here, do you agree?
Kitten Kong
I remember back in high school in my classroom the clock was totally ******, it would take about 20 minutes to move up the left hand side and the normal 30 secs to head back down again. As far as that clock was concerned time was practically standing still and we had a lot of fun and also pain over it back then. If you want time to move faster just shake your head really fast, time is relative to the observer and the faster you are moving the faster time will pass around you, go on, do it!
doppleganger
its all in the mind, dats all
skygaia
I think...
When I was 10 years old, 1 year was 1/10 in my life....
But now I'm 40 years old.. so 1 year is 1/40 in my life.. it means this time gose faster 4 times than when I was 10.. Crying or Very sad
For very young children, it's very difficult to consentrate something for long time even thought they really loved it.
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