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The meaning of "Amen".






The word "Amen" is a notarikon (kabalistic acronym) and means "Al (ehl) Melech Nehehmahn ("God is our faithful king").
I'd heard this before and believe it.
8%
 8%  [ 2 ]
I'd heard this before but don't believe it.
4%
 4%  [ 1 ]
I hadn't heard this before but I have no reason to doubt it.
13%
 13%  [ 3 ]
I hadn't heard this before and can't bring myself to believe it now.
34%
 34%  [ 8 ]
I don't like the above options and will comment below.
39%
 39%  [ 9 ]
Total Votes : 23

Eyvind
Howdy folks,

According to Donald Michael Kraig in his book Modern Magic (2003:62) the word "amen" has its roots in the Literal Kabalah. It is, according to him, a kind of acronym (the kabalistic word for it is "notarikon") for a Hebrew phrase: Al Melech Nehehmahn, "God is our faithful king".

I was just wondering how many people (particularly how many Christians) are aware of this interpretation and of those who are aware, how many believe it to be true.

I'd like to hear any thoughts on this and any comments or thoughts on the word "amen" and its use in general.

Thanks,

Take care,
Eyvind
loyal
That's a very weird meaning of "amen".

If i remember correctly, it simply means "we/i agree" in reponse to a community prayer, in arabic. Since arabic is similar to Hebrew, it most likely means the same thing.

may God bless you.
coeus
source:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amen wrote:

The word Amen ... is a declaration of affirmation found in the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, and in the Qur'an.


Don't see any other defination for the word when doing a define: amen in google.
Shewolf
I always thought Amen meant something like "and let it be", or something like that, and I've sort of always liked that thought. It makes Christianity a little bit more "down to earth", when asking after a prayer that the future will be so. More like a wish, or a asking, than a actual word of worship.
I have really no knowledge what so ever about Qu/K-(spell ut how ever you want)-balah, so I can't really speak for or against this statement. But it's common knowledge that you may find many "hidden messages" both in the Bible, and in every so-called holy text.
Jinx
I've never heard the definition above. I always understood "amen" to be similar to "so mote it be", which is used in many neo-pagan traditions: simply an affirmation or a hope that whatever was asked will be true.
palavra
in turkish language also we use the same phrase,it comes from arabic language.
Jakob [JaWGames]
I have been told that the meaning of amen is "S r det" or "So it is" in english. That might be wrong though.
Eyvind
Thanks for all the responses so far.

According to my Hebrew lexicon (The New Brown-Driver-Briggs-Gesenius Hebrew-English Lexicon) amen is an adverb and is translated directly as "verily, truly".

It seems to be used in modern times (by Christians, at least) in two main ways: 1) as a closure to prayers; and 2) as a kind of "here here!" agreement to what other people are saying.

Assuming the kabalistic notarikon has a historical development (and is not the result of Kraig's modern occult interpretation) then do you suppose it was developed after the word "amen" had been in strong use in the two ways mentioned above? Or do you think the notarikon meaning is what helped to steer people into using it this way (the mystical meaning adding a kind of magical power to the utterance)?

Take care,
Eyvind
mrimp
i'm a Christian but i never knew of that meaning. I randomly remember someone saying it meant 'i agree' but i'm sure that may be incorrect
Soulfire
I've always learned Amen to mean "So be it" in Hebrew.
jwellsy
That's about the silliest poll I've ever seen.
The fellow that wrote that book needs to read Wikipedia.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amen
Arnie
Not everything people write in books is true. In particular when it concerns interpretation of the Bible you can't be careful enough. Many people have been deceived in many ways and ended up in weird cults. You have to check it out for yourself if it's true.
Eyvind
jwellsy wrote:
That's about the silliest poll I've ever seen.
The fellow that wrote that book needs to read Wikipedia.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amen


I'm sorry jwellsy, but I can't help feeling insulted by that.

I wrote:
I was just wondering how many people (particularly how many Christians) are aware of this interpretation and of those who are aware, how many believe it to be true.


Why would you think this is a silly poll (let alone the "silliest" poll you'd ever seen)? I was careful to use the word "interpretation" not "meaning". And I certainly wasn't impling that it is an undisputed fact (the "assumption" in my second post was a hypothetical one made in hopes of stimulating deeper discussion). I just wanted to get a feel for what people had heard about it.

Having said that, I find it rather humourous that you would cite Wikipedia as an authoritative source. Sure, it's useful as a starting point for research, but there are more than a few universities that have banned students from citing it in their papers. Perhaps there is a good reason for this.

Arnie wrote:
Not everything people write in books is true. ...*snip*.... You have to check it out for yourself if it's true.


This goes without saying and is, in my opinion, the whole reason we go to school. Critical thinking. It's why I posted this poll in the first place. There's a lot more "out there" than just what's on the net (regardless of what the Wiki-worshipers think)... and there may be *shock, gasp* more out there than what's in books!

The comments from the Christian point of view seem to be pretty consistent. This is, in iteslf, an interesting result of the poll. Thanks to all who have contributed thus far. But is there anyone out there that would care to comment on this thread from a kabbalistic (or modern occult - I know there are some Thelemites out there!) point of view?

Thanks.
Take care,
Eyvind
reveka
actually, like the zero, algebra and the decimal this was carried west from India by arab traders. The word Amen originates in OM, which even today is chanted slowly with a slightly discernible "n" added on to the end. It had been used in ancient Vedic text which is over 3,000 years old.
Aredon
Eyvind wrote:
jwellsy wrote:
That's about the silliest poll I've ever seen.
The fellow that wrote that book needs to read Wikipedia.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amen


I'm sorry jwellsy, but I can't help feeling insulted by that.

ehh I don't know, the wikipedia page on that actually looks pretty legit overall. I could be wrong I suppose, but it looks pretty accurate.
loyal
reveka wrote:
actually, like the zero, algebra and the decimal this was carried west from India by arab traders. The word Amen originates in OM, which even today is chanted slowly with a slightly discernible "n" added on to the end. It had been used in ancient Vedic text which is over 3,000 years old.


That doesn't sound right. The word "amen" was used by Muslims in the 7th century. That's before they built a great empire, which included trading. In other words, they started using amen before they traded with the Indians. Besides, Om is a Hindi word, whereas Amen is a Semitic root. You could probably look up the root of the word Amen in an Arabic lexicon.

Peace.
TBSC
Eyvind wrote:
Howdy folks,

According to Donald Michael Kraig in his book Modern Magic (2003:62) the word "amen" has its roots in the Literal Kabalah. It is, according to him, a kind of acronym (the kabalistic word for it is "notarikon") for a Hebrew phrase: Al Melech Nehehmahn, "God is our faithful king".

I was just wondering how many people (particularly how many Christians) are aware of this interpretation and of those who are aware, how many believe it to be true.

I'd like to hear any thoughts on this and any comments or thoughts on the word "amen" and its use in general.

Thanks,

Take care,
Eyvind


Hi, I did hear something similar to that in the church I went to. Although today for most people it means agreement.
Tadtoad
As i learnt as a kid, "Amen" means "may it be so". Never really looked into it though, I mean how many things from childhood do you go back and research?

Then again, I may be confusing it with "So say we all" from battlestar galactica... I joke, I joke. Don't hurt me Cylons!
Prasad007
I hadn't heard this before but I have no reason to doubt it.
drums4him
while i was in school, a Jewish Rabbi taught Old Testament and Hebrew. He told and taught us about this, so i am pretty sure that it is legit. it is as much an acronym as it is a word. but the word is more powerful when you know the meaning behind it.

plus, let us say that what the Rabbi or the person stated is wrong, there is nothing that is condemning God because of the meaning, so i don't see what could be wrong with it...
mhamad84
i am not sure about its lexical meaning, what i know that its used in all languages..
when i say it, i can define it like i feel its meaning this way: "I confirm and agree the said prayer for God"
Idea Arrow something like this in somehow Laughing
jeffryjon
Original pronounciation Aumen. In ancient English churches there is an aumbry room ( a room in which an individual can chant his aums). It's a tiny room that takes a single occupant for someone to be alone with God.

Some Americans etc mispronounced the word as if it doesn't matter so we get 'eh! men' which is different altogether. I'm not looking to insult the Americans but truth means getting back to the root and finding how things came about. There is much supposition that Jesus may have spent time in an area now known as India and much of the belief systems there was brought by the Aryans from the middle East. Why religions feel the need to nit-pick and keep themselves at odds is something I have no wish to understand. Jesus is quoted as saying that God is not only for the Jews - so why would people now think he is only for the Christians?
ocalhoun
jeffryjon wrote:
There is much supposition that Jesus may have spent time in an area now known as India and much of the belief systems there was brought by the Aryans from the middle East.

Uh, much more likely he might have talked to someone from India... That's a long way for a poor carpenter to travel -- probably on foot, or perhaps donkey-back -- without any real reason to...
Huffy721
ocalhoun wrote:
jeffryjon wrote:
There is much supposition that Jesus may have spent time in an area now known as India and much of the belief systems there was brought by the Aryans from the middle East.

Uh, much more likely he might have talked to someone from India... That's a long way for a poor carpenter to travel -- probably on foot, or perhaps donkey-back -- without any real reason to...


Remember that Jesus had royal blood lineage and as such was not as poor as you might think. His adopted father Joseph died soon after his birth and Joseph of Arimathea (Mary's uncle) took him in. It was this Joseph that took his body from the cross and laid him in his tomb. Joseph of Arimathea was rich enough to have a tomb prepared for himself. And Jesus traveled the world with him during his childhood. There are plenty legends that say Jesus visited England and personally laid the foundations of a physical building church there. Look up Glastenbury legends

http://www.britainexpress.com/Myths/Glastonbury.htm
spinout
Once upon a time in Sweden I went to church and got the explanation that "amen" means "TRUTH".
So I have always thought that since, but hopefully the state church is wrong and it mean "Satan rules" .... Twisted Evil
Indi
I have to admit, i am thoroughly amused by the fact that people repeat this word mindlessly over and over, but have never once thought to look into what it actually means. For all you people know, you have been repeating the ancient Hebrew cheer "rape is awesome".

Frankly, i like spinout's idea - if i had a time machine i would go back to the Bronze Age and replace all appearances of "amen" with something meaning "Satan rules", then sit back and watch as billions of believers over thousands of years mindlessly repeat it.
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