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How to train a dog?





qazwsx741
How to train a dog?
i have a dog, it is very cute .but one thing made me annoyed , is that he don;t know where to piss. he always pisses any places he loves, and there is nothing i can do about it ,but do the cleaning.
Have it ever happened to youself? how did you deal with it ?
Give me some advice.
Cddhesh
Dogs should be trained from their childhood.I have trained my dogs to do things like bringing a ball,paper,tub, other kinds of utensils.When it was small i used to show him how to catch ball and bring.If he brings i had nice treat for him,i.e good pedigree.So he understood that doing some thing means he will get good treat.Its now a habit for him.He is of 4 years now he helps me in my work.So its better to train dog in its childhood
Shewolf
Male dogs may start "marking their territory", if they find it necessary, even though they do not have for habit to pee where they should not. If there are other male dogs around, or it does not feel completly confident about its place in the family etc.
If it's a doing of NEED, then you have to take the poor guy out for a walk a little more often. Read his body language, if he's luring around wondering what to do, and does not seem like wanting to lie down, take him out. Tell him what a good boy he is, and you will all be happier Smile
jwellsy
Use simple commands and be consistent.
Don't talk to him in sentences.
He will never understand a sentence in his whole life.
He will only understand simple commands, tone and energy.
Use a crate at night and while your gone.
Crate training will solve many problems before they develop.
Each time you take him out to potty just before going out the door
say "show me - sit"
this will teach him to signal you with a sit by the door anytime he needs to go out.

I use "show me - sit" a lot before going potty, eating, going to bed/crate.
Then when my dog is trying to tell me something, I tell her to "show me"
and she will sit near whatever it is she wants.

Do not wait until the dog is nervous or anxious as a sign to take it out.
Develop a routine.
Let him out twice in the morning,
once to potty(pee) before he gets breakfast,
and again after he eats to poop
(don't use the command S-H-I-T, it sounds too much like sit).
My dog does even poops on command, if she can. She will at least try.

As soon as you get home let him out to potty,
and again before bed.

When he has an accident inside and you see him doing it
don't hit him, just raise your voice to show your displeasure,
he will understand that you are not happy.

If you find a mess
call him in and make him sit by it
point at it and declare in a firm voice "BAD"
and then take the dog outside and tell it to potty.


The younger you have him neutered
the less territorial marking he will do.
If you wait too long to have him fixed
he may continue marking for the rest of his life.
vinx_18
Dog when train at early age has a big difference. Here is a tip from a good source.

Quote:
How To Train A Puppy - The Positive Non Violent Way

It's important with all dog training but especially with young puppies to use lots of encouragement, praise and rewards (positive reinforcement) in your training. Start your puppy training sessions as soon as your little puppy arrives at your home. Set your puppy up to succeed, concentrate on developing desirable habits in your puppy and preventing undesirable behavior. It's much a better alternative to put your puppy on the right path from the start, rather than trying to correct established problem behaviors later on.

Keep your training sessions short, consistent and always have fun. The key to shaping your puppy's behavior is to start out with very easy commands, continue to build on these successes and apply heaps of repetition. Base your training sessions around trust and mutual respect rather than old school methods based on punishment and harsh corrections. In this environment you will find that your puppy loves his training sessions and his confidence will grow with each and every session.

Always remember that you are dealing with a very immature young animal. Be realistic, flexible, patient and always fair. Your puppy doesn't just automatically know this stuff! It's all new to him and he is bound to have the odd slip up and mistake along the way. Don't worry about these mistakes, just move on and do your best to prevent them in the future.

Enjoy this fantastic time in your dogs life. His puppyhood is the time where you will lay the foundation for your puppy's life. It's also where you will develop, build and strengthen the special bond you will share with your dog for life.
Daisie
As Jwellsy said, crates are really good to train a dog to go potty as dog will never soil their own bed. We trained our dog that way and as soon as we took her out of it, we put the lead on and took her to the same place at the back of the garden and waited for potty, then a lot of "good girl", treat and fuss. She now does it only there Smile
it's all down to simple commands, treats and fuss!
Idoru
We have a dog, a young one (7 month's), and have recentlly had the same problem. When we brought him home
he wasn't adjusted to living with humans or in a place where he couldn't go where he wanted. We simply put up with
it and did the cleaning - but - everytime he did his needs indoors we took him out. Sometimes he continued outdoors,
sometimes not. We had to clean about four to six weeks before he got the idea, and, as have been said here earlier,
kept a keen eye on his body-language.

The combination of reading the dog and show him what's right worked out fine for us. Tell him when he does
something right, or show him how you want things. You have to be the leader for your dog, or potty-training will
be your least problem. Lot's of patience and attention.

There are also classes to attend. It cost's a bit, but is often worth it. We just started going to a class in obedience
for the dog, and it's already paying of. Litterature is included and you get a chance to meet experienced
dog-keepers.

Best of luck!
ocalhoun
vinx_18 wrote:
Dog when train at early age has a big difference. Here is a tip from a good source.

Quote:
How To Train A Puppy - The Positive Non Violent Way

It's important with all dog training but especially with young puppies to use lots of encouragement, praise and rewards (positive reinforcement) in your training. Start your puppy training sessions as soon as your little puppy arrives at your home. Set your puppy up to succeed, concentrate on developing desirable habits in your puppy and preventing undesirable behavior. It's much a better alternative to put your puppy on the right path from the start, rather than trying to correct established problem behaviors later on.

Keep your training sessions short, consistent and always have fun. The key to shaping your puppy's behavior is to start out with very easy commands, continue to build on these successes and apply heaps of repetition. Base your training sessions around trust and mutual respect rather than old school methods based on punishment and harsh corrections. In this environment you will find that your puppy loves his training sessions and his confidence will grow with each and every session.

Always remember that you are dealing with a very immature young animal. Be realistic, flexible, patient and always fair. Your puppy doesn't just automatically know this stuff! It's all new to him and he is bound to have the odd slip up and mistake along the way. Don't worry about these mistakes, just move on and do your best to prevent them in the future.

Enjoy this fantastic time in your dogs life. His puppyhood is the time where you will lay the foundation for your puppy's life. It's also where you will develop, build and strengthen the special bond you will share with your dog for life.

That said, a good smack when he does something wrong can work wonders. (Don't overdo it, though. That would be animal abuse.) Just enough to tell him that you disapprove, and it should come immediately after or while he's doing whatever you don't want him to (waiting too long afterwards is pointless because they then don't associate the wrong action with the punishment, and get confused). I've taught my dog not to bark at everything that way.
woundedhealer
Quote:
That said, a good smack when he does something wrong can work wonders.

I totally disagree with abusing animals in this way, violence breeds violence.

Take your dog outside at least every hour and if he does a pee give him loads of praise. If he has had a pee indoors totally ignore him when you clean it up, if you make a fuss about it the dog will think it has done something right. If you manage to catch your dog as it's about to pee and you're close enough, quickly pick it up and take it outside. If you're at distance, make a noise to distract him, and take him outside. While your at home you could try using an umbilcial (hands free) lead and tether him to you so you can see imediatly when he's about to pee.

My dog was a rescue who we think often had to pee in the kitchen. I followed her everytime she went in the kitchen so as to catch her as she sqatted. I made a made a noise to distract her and then picked her up and put her in the garden. It took her just three days to learn the kitchen is not the place to pee.

It's people, not dogs who need training. Dogs need strong leadership.
fbcompany
you kick my dog? you kicked my dog.

Umm yeah rewarding rather then punishing is the way to go.
Dean_The_Great
Although rewarding is totally the way to go, don't rely on treats as rewards... if your dog expects treats all the time, and you give them treats all the time, you will get an unhealthy dog. If you treat your dog with rub-downs or something like that, your dog won't always expect a treat, and it will make the treats more special when they get them.
jwellsy
Of course you could also get an electric shock collar.
ocalhoun
woundedhealer wrote:
Quote:
That said, a good smack when he does something wrong can work wonders.

I totally disagree with abusing animals in this way, violence breeds violence.

I suppose you disagree with spanking children, too. Right?
All the smack is for is to teach the dog that 'NO' = I disapprove. Depending on the dog, it should soon stop whatever it's doing just when you say 'NO', without needing a smack.
Quote:

violence breeds violence.

Well, my dog must be the exception to that... She isn't violent at all.
woundedhealer
ocalhoun wrote:
woundedhealer wrote:
Quote:
That said, a good smack when he does something wrong can work wonders.

I totally disagree with abusing animals in this way, violence breeds violence.

I suppose you disagree with spanking children, too. Right?
All the smack is for is to teach the dog that 'NO' = I disapprove. Depending on the dog, it should soon stop whatever it's doing just when you say 'NO', without needing a smack.
Quote:

violence breeds violence.

Well, my dog must be the exception to that... She isn't violent at all.


Spanking children is illegal in the UK, with good reason.
I also don't believe in shouting at dogs.You cannot compare children with dogs, the psychology is totallly different. I don't need to smack my dog for her to know something is unacceptable, often a look is all it takes. I believe humans should be the pack leaders, which is what the dog needs. When you are the pack leader the dog obeys willingly out of respect, not fear.
Bannik
woundedhealer wrote:
ocalhoun wrote:
woundedhealer wrote:
Quote:
That said, a good smack when he does something wrong can work wonders.

I totally disagree with abusing animals in this way, violence breeds violence.

I suppose you disagree with spanking children, too. Right?
All the smack is for is to teach the dog that 'NO' = I disapprove. Depending on the dog, it should soon stop whatever it's doing just when you say 'NO', without needing a smack.
Quote:

violence breeds violence.

Well, my dog must be the exception to that... She isn't violent at all.


Spanking children is illegal in the UK, with good reason.
I also don't believe in shouting at dogs.You cannot compare children with dogs, the psychology is totallly different. I don't need to smack my dog for her to know something is unacceptable, often a look is all it takes. I believe humans should be the pack leaders, which is what the dog needs. When you are the pack leader the dog obeys willingly out of respect, not fear.


yes but how do you reach that sort of respect, like most pack animals the way to sort out leaders and followers is with fear or violence.
Personally showing violence to your dog (nothing extreme like a tap on the nose or something he finds discomforting but not painful ) is ok, if you watch wild videos you see most animals show their authority through fear and violence.
try using an item they don't like i.e air filled sprays (most dogs hate the psssh sound and the air blown) also note which dog you want to train, some dogs train easier then others and other if you use violence on them they will use violence on you (rotties are one who you do not hit cause they can hit back.
Kelvin
We trained our dog to do her business on newpaper laid on the floor. It's much easier to train it when they are young. Just have to keep repeating to them the 1st few times and acknowledge their actions when they do it right by saying 'good girl/boy'. There is also this spot trainer that you can buy off the pet shop that you just drip on a spot that you want your dog to pee on...
woundedhealer
Bannik wrote:
woundedhealer wrote:
ocalhoun wrote:
woundedhealer wrote:
Quote:
That said, a good smack when he does something wrong can work wonders.

I totally disagree with abusing animals in this way, violence breeds violence.

I suppose you disagree with spanking children, too. Right?
All the smack is for is to teach the dog that 'NO' = I disapprove. Depending on the dog, it should soon stop whatever it's doing just when you say 'NO', without needing a smack.
Quote:

violence breeds violence.

Well, my dog must be the exception to that... She isn't violent at all.


Spanking children is illegal in the UK, with good reason.
I also don't believe in shouting at dogs.You cannot compare children with dogs, the psychology is totallly different. I don't need to smack my dog for her to know something is unacceptable, often a look is all it takes. I believe humans should be the pack leaders, which is what the dog needs. When you are the pack leader the dog obeys willingly out of respect, not fear.


yes but how do you reach that sort of respect, like most pack animals the way to sort out leaders and followers is with fear or violence.
Personally showing violence to your dog (nothing extreme like a tap on the nose or something he finds discomforting but not painful ) is ok, if you watch wild videos you see most animals show their authority through fear and violence.
try using an item they don't like i.e air filled sprays (most dogs hate the psssh sound and the air blown) also note which dog you want to train, some dogs train easier then others and other if you use violence on them they will use violence on you (rotties are one who you do not hit cause they can hit back.


I you were to watch videos on wild dogs or wolves you would see the alpha males and females do not use violence and fear to keep the pack in order. They use body language and their energy is stronger, just like natural leaders within humans. They don't use violence, injury to themselves or another will weaken the pack, and a leader needs a strong pack. They do put an animal in a submisive position if they step out of line, but this has nothing to do with violence. What they do is to put the animal on it's side and have his mouth around the others neck, not hard enough to hurt. I've been fortunate enough to see this happen and it was incredible. When the one in submission was released, it sat in front of the alpha, keeping his body low, which is another sign of submission. I've used this method on my own dog, using my hand and fingers in place of mouth and teeth. When I released my dog, it continued laying there, another sign of submission.

Fearful dogs/wolves are unbalanced so would weaken the pack, so it's not in the leaders best interest to rule through fear. Fearful dogs can have fear aggression, which makes them more unpredictable than aggressive dog.

So now to answer the question, how do we earn respect from our dogs. The short answer is to be a strong, calm leader. Like the alpha male/females, you need good body language, standing straight, not slouched, voice firm but calm.

By observing your dog you can stop bad behaviour before it starts. A sound like a-a or sh or even "psssh" is usually enough. If they've gone to far to hear you, a quick touch will be neccessary. A dog doesn't understand sentences so a sharp "no" is more effective "than nooo stop that right now...."
A dog needs consistency otherwise it will get confused. If it's not allowed on a chair or the bed, it should never be allowed on it.
I teach my dogs hand signals. If they aren't looking at me I get their attention by telling them "focus". I find they respond quicker to signals, although I also teach verbal commands as well.
Any dog can turn violent on you if you're violent towards them, and they don't have to have aggressive natures to begin with. As I said earlier, fear aggression is worse. Using violence against a timid dog can turn them into a dog that is terrified of doing something wrong. I had a rescue dog like that once and it was pitiful to see. It took a lot of patience for her to get over her fears, and their were some she never lost.

Please people, do not use violence towards your dogs, they don't need it, they do need a good calm assertive leader.
Rico
Love and patients, lots and lots of patients and also treats but mostly love.
tijn01
You should watch that show 'its me or the dog' that woman is a great dog trainer! Show mostly stays stern with them. There was one show where the dog was peeing everywhere and it had something to do with it needing to mark its territory. The first thing you have to do is scrub the room so it's completely free of smells. Then makes sure you take the dog out really regularly. She often turns her back on the dog or leaves the room when the dog does something she doesn't like, until the dog learns not to do it... good luck
Kasts
simple advise:
buy book how to teach dog
or
bring your dog to dogs school.
natem
My dog would pee or poop on the floor just to annoy me. It was a control thing I think. I would take him out, wait forever and he would go as soon as we got inside. He was a very dominant dog, and didn't like being told what to do. He would run away all the time too. I miss him, but he sure was a jerk! Very hyper too, chewed the siding of our house. He took him to obedience lessons, walked him, played with him, but I swear he had dog ADHD. He lives on a farm with an obedience trainer now, and he is still a hyper little chicken eating jerk.
greekwoof
!! its very hard to train a dog.. i never heared that someone trained his dog alone..
in my opinion dogs can be only trained by proffesionals..
on the other hand u can teach 'em not to pee everywhere, not to make noise etc etc..
good luck! Very Happy
Sparda
Yes.. all of my dogs were like this when I first got them as puppies. They would just pee all over the house. As time progressed the dog started to understand "bad dog" and "good dog". I also taught my dogs a command called "outside" and they will come running to the door. I also taught them "cage" to go in their doggy cage for when we are leaving to go to the store or something. As far as teaching your dog to go outside instead of inside I would suggest one of the posts above. I've seen some good ideas to go by.
woundedhealer
natem wrote:
My dog would pee or poop on the floor just to annoy me. It was a control thing I think. I would take him out, wait forever and he would go as soon as we got inside. He was a very dominant dog, and didn't like being told what to do. He would run away all the time too. I miss him, but he sure was a jerk! Very hyper too, chewed the siding of our house. He took him to obedience lessons, walked him, played with him, but I swear he had dog ADHD. He lives on a farm with an obedience trainer now, and he is still a hyper little chicken eating jerk.


Dogs don't do things to annoy us. This is a dominance thing. You allowed your dog to be the leader, he was markng his territory. This is a very high energy dog and the rule is never get a dog with a higher energy level than yours, it'll lead to problems as you found out. You were right to find it a more suitable home, although if it's hyper it's needs still aren't being met.


greekwolf wrote:
!! its very hard to train a dog.. i never heared that someone trained his dog alone..
in my opinion dogs can be only trained by proffesionals..

You're hearing about someone who trained their own dog now. I've never taken my dogs to training classes. I've also trained my present dog to be my disability assistance dog. It's not difficult to train your own dog. It needs patience, consistancy and calm but firmness. I also think a knowledge of dog psychology helps as well.
I've heard some horror stories about dog trainers. I know someone who was told there was no hope for his dog and it should be put down. He instead saw a dog councellor who told him his dog was not at all aggressive but was timid and everything he was told by the trainer was wrong and had made the dog worse. The councellor really knew what she was talking about and was able to undo the harm done so that the dog is now happy, friendly and very well adjusted.
azbuky
Hello!

All my life, I had cat as pets. As you all know, they are very different from dogs. Three weeks ago, I bought a cute little dog. At first, it was very naughty, but then, I trained her to do things the way I wanted it. For example, she only does her necessities outside because dogs know, from they way you speak to them, if they did wrong or not. I didn't beat her, but I raised my voice. And dogs love to do you good, they would do almost anything not to upset you, so the key is to show him that you are disturbed by his behavior. I also trained her to sit and small things like that. Of course, I still have time.

Of course, these things are not general. The training procedure depends a lot of the dog, just like in a child's case.

Good luck!
azbuky
Kasts wrote:
simple advise:
buy book how to teach dog
or
bring your dog to dogs school.




This is stupid! It's the most not "out of the box" way of thinking! It's like you would raise your child following the instructions from a book or, worse, paying some teacher to do so! First of all, nobody can train your dog better that you, because YOU are the master, not some stupid instructor. Also, you are the one who loves him. The trainer doesn't. He will do whatever it takes to train your dog, even beat him, because this will bring him fame and money. And he has the advantage that dogs can't speak and they can't say what happened during the training.

About the book part, it is also stupid, because every dog, cat, person etc has it's own personality and his own way of being, so you can't read this from a book! This is the mistery of life: diversity. So, my advice is: use your abilities to train your dog. It may not be the best trained dog, but it will be trained and raised by you and you can say, at the end, that the dog is completely yours! And LOVE THEM! Smile
woundedhealer
azbuky wrote:
Kasts wrote:
simple advise:
buy book how to teach dog
or
bring your dog to dogs school.




This is stupid! It's the most not "out of the box" way of thinking! It's like you would raise your child following the instructions from a book or, worse, paying some teacher to do so! First of all, nobody can train your dog better that you, because YOU are the master, not some stupid instructor. Also, you are the one who loves him. The trainer doesn't. He will do whatever it takes to train your dog, even beat him, because this will bring him fame and money. And he has the advantage that dogs can't speak and they can't say what happened during the training.

About the book part, it is also stupid, because every dog, cat, person etc has it's own personality and his own way of being, so you can't read this from a book! This is the mistery of life: diversity. So, my advice is: use your abilities to train your dog. It may not be the best trained dog, but it will be trained and raised by you and you can say, at the end, that the dog is completely yours! And LOVE THEM! Smile


I have to disagree with this. When I had two dogs for together for the first time I found I was making mistakes so I got a book on dog psychology which covered having more than one dog. This was a huge help. I realised where I was going wrong and corrected it.
Whether you get a book on dog psychology or basic training, the general rules are the same for everyone. Some dogs are more headstrong, others are more timid so yes, you do have to adapt to suit the dog, but like I said, the rules are still the same.
A person who knows nothing about dog training or dog psychology is going to make loads of mistakes. It's not enough to be the master and to love them. How can you even be the master if you don't know what you're doing?

Quote:
The trainer doesn't. He will do whatever it takes to train your dog, even beat him, because this will bring him fame and money. And he has the advantage that dogs can't speak and they can't say what happened during the training.


I think if someone saw a trainer beat their dog, they would soon say something. How on earth could beating a dog bring him fame and money? Dogs may not verbalise what's happened but they show it in their body language. I used to take yorkie I had to a grooming parlour. The lady who did him, adored him. When she was finished, she didn't put him in a cage like the dogs were, but was allowed to sit on a window sill so he could look out of the window. When she left someone else did him. It didn't take me long to realise he wasn't happy with this new groomer. Of course, he couldn't tell me what happened so I couldn't take it further, but I never took him back there.

Although I mentioned horror stories regarding trainers in an earlier post, this doesn't mean I'm against all of them, only the bad ones. The secret is to check out the trainer beforehand. Ask others who have used him. I've never taken any of my dogs to puppy training, but I think it's a great way to socialize your dog. If you don't like the trainers methods, you stop using him.

I would advice someone to buy a book before they even got a dog. My choice would be on dog psychology, but one on training is equally as good. You see, people either buy a puppy or adopt a rescue dog without any idea whatsover. Often getting a most unsuitable dog for them.
As for comparing dogs to child raising, have you never seen programs like Nanny 911 or Super Nanny? At long last parents are getting some great advice on child rearing.
Coclus
Starting early and using treats is my tipp..
thealpha
you may use the classical learning theory for training your pets,
it do works
woundedhealer
thealpha wrote:
you may use the classical learning theory for training your pets,
it do works

What is the clasical learning theory?
russel26
ill trained my dog when a little until grow up...
russel26
ill trained my dog when a little until grow up...
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