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Balancing work and fitness





fbcompany
I exercise about 6 days a week - normally mostly running but at the moment it's cycling and swimming.
I'm a bit addicted to it and get irritable if I can't do it.

I'm in a position at the moment having recently graduated that I need to decide what path I want to take for my career.

I have the potential of getting a job in a very good firm. It would mean good money, but hard work and long hours (12-13 hr days). It would also set me up very well for the rest of my career and would look great on my resume.

I know this might sound silly to base my career path on this, but I've always thought I would rather earn less and not work as long/hard because I'm scared that my health/fitness/running would be compromised because I simply wouldn't have the time/energy to do it anymore.

I currently work an easy 7.5hr day and already find the 5:30am wake-ups tough enough.

I was just wanting other sporty people's opinions.. Do many of you manage to maintain a good fitness regime and still work long hours?

(Please don't bother replying unless you actually understand the desire to maintain fitness and good health).
Vlien
I know a guy who lives upstairs from me who goes to fitness about three times a week I guess. He works in 'shifts', if that's the correct English equivalent. I know from his girlfriend that he's always working out late in the evening - like at ten or eleven pm.
I must say, I could never do that! Thank god I'm still a student and I can go for a run whenever I like to :p Since a couple of weeks I'm trying to run half an hour twice a week...
c'tair
You know, just aslong you get those 8 hours of sleep and the ability to eat enough, you could still train and be fit. Hell, I workout 4 times a week, soon Ill be working out 7 times a week, each day, and then twice a day. I just do an intensive bodyweight workout, lots of pullups and pushups, and Im in pretty good shape, although I think Ill need some more running or cardio in any case. I think that you could keep fit while investing about 20-30 minutes per day into working out, unless you wanna sign up for a gym, which will take atleast an hour per (or as long as you want, but most people go in for atleast an hour).
Cardio like running, swimming or cycling takes the most time, Id try to find a good day hour to do that, or it really depends on your shift, you can easily swim at night if you have that option, it wouldnt be impossible to run at night, although a bit more risky due to muggings and the such (depends where you live) but cycling at night alot mroe risky (also depends where you live), its easier to get mugged and easier to have an accident.
chasbeen
If you can exercise during your lunch break at work then thats a real bonus. I find this very good for the afternoon in the office as it makes me feel relaxed. More relaxed than my stressed colleagues. Its the synatropin the body produces you see. Wink
driftingfe3s
12-13 hours sounds tough. You could possibly get a short work out right after you go home from work, around 30-45 mins. But it is tough after working long days. Recently my girlfriend has been working a bit longer and she has time to go to the gym, but it much too tired to go. So you'll also have to factor in your energy level and how much sleep you get to see if you can even work out.

If you took that job how far would it be from home. Maybe you could bike to work, or if its too far take the bus part of the way and then bike the rest. This way you could get some of your cardio workout without having to find some extra time to exercise in.
benjmd
Hi fbcompany,

I will give you the perspective of a medical student that has had the opportunity to work long days over an extended period of time. Exercising 6 days a week will be tough. Exercising 4 days a week should be very doable.

There is a bit of time management to consider. I refuse to recommend that anyone average less than 7 hours of sleep per night. If you sleep for 7 hours, work for 12 hours, and travel (to and from) for 1 hour, that is 20 hours. Add in an hour for personal hygiene and an hour for food and you have 2 hours left in the day. Clearly, making exercise a part of your routine means prioritizing it over other recreational activities because you won't have a large amount of recreation time to divide among many things. That is why I say that exercising 4 times a week, where you still have days without exercise to get things done, is definitely possible. Having a good diet, being sure to get a good night's sleep, and drinking plenty of water will help you to stay energized for working out.

HOWEVER, it can be done. Even when I was spending 75-80 hours per week in the hospital I managed to work out. But because you are also working harder at other things, it helps to cut yourself a little slack when you feel a little ill or just worn down--overdoing it at such a juncture will only make you feel worse and set you back more.

fbcompany wrote:
I exercise about 6 days a week - normally mostly running but at the moment it's cycling and swimming.
I'm a bit addicted to it and get irritable if I can't do it.

I'm in a position at the moment having recently graduated that I need to decide what path I want to take for my career.

I have the potential of getting a job in a very good firm. It would mean good money, but hard work and long hours (12-13 hr days). It would also set me up very well for the rest of my career and would look great on my resume.

I know this might sound silly to base my career path on this, but I've always thought I would rather earn less and not work as long/hard because I'm scared that my health/fitness/running would be compromised because I simply wouldn't have the time/energy to do it anymore.

I currently work an easy 7.5hr day and already find the 5:30am wake-ups tough enough.

I was just wanting other sporty people's opinions.. Do many of you manage to maintain a good fitness regime and still work long hours?

(Please don't bother replying unless you actually understand the desire to maintain fitness and good health).
mad-life
Hm.. I've gotten lucky here, I 'spose. I currently work partime IT and parttime as a martial arts instructor, so I get the ebst of both worlds. As to the question of whether or not you should take the job, I'd say no. It sounds like a good shot, but those may come again. But if you sacrifice your body, that's a loss you'll be hard place to salvage later. Than again, if you slowly reduce the amount of training to, say, 2 hours of jogging/running over a period of some months, you'll still keep a fit body with an easy load of practice while having a good job.
furtasacra
Something to do when applying for a job -- ask for a tour of the facilities. A surprising number of companies have a small gym right in the office, including two that I worked for. I could hop on the treadmill or the stair machine, and exercise for fifteen or twenty minutes during my lunch hour (or my dinner break if I was working late) without having to waste time traveling.

It's a good idea to ask for a walk around, in any case -- if you're planning on being at a company for a long time, and your potential co-workers look tense and miserable, you probably don't want to work there. Stress can be just as bad for your health as lack of exercise.
mawfia
I have been in the Marine Corps for over two years. There have been periods of long work days followed by periods of very little work. The most extreme cases have been basic training and time when my unit is deployed where the work hours for a day consistenly total 24. Teh caveat to this is that when we are deployed on our off days the only real alternative for recreation other than sleep or reading is working out so that makes it very easy to stay in shape on up tempo months. When in garrison or in the US work takes on more of a traditional 9-5 cycle and actually requires more commitment to working out as how the original poster stated.

My best advice is to be flexible. I have changed my workout plan since being in college where I worked out for three hours everyday and worked out the same muslce three days a week. Now I do things more efficiently coupled with eating smartly as opposed to eating everything. Alot of it has to do with your goals as well...
Liu
To be honest, after graduating from the University this past June I haven't had time to work out as much as I used to when I was still in college. My hours range from 8 to 17 hours, and at times required travel.

The best I could do is work out when I can at a hotel, and whenever I get back in town.

Welcome to the real world. On the upside, the $ is good. Smile
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