FRIHOSTFORUMSSEARCHFAQTOSBLOGSCOMPETITIONS
You are invited to Log in or Register a free Frihost Account!


A few examples of amazingly smart animals.





ocalhoun
These are a few excerpts from a book I finished reading recently.
Each shows a surprising amount of intelligence in a particular animal; some far more than you would expect.

On Prairie Dogs (Social rodents living in large, communal burrows in the western USA):
Quote:

Recently, a scholar from Arizona, Con Slobodchikoff, discovered that prairie dog calls are even more sophisticated than previously thought. Not only do they have distinct calls for different enemies, but they also have a special sound made only for human beings approaching their territory, and yet another different sound for a human male armed with a gun. Moreover, if the same man returns months later without his gun, the prairie dogs remember that he once came by with a gun, and give the warning sound for man carrying gun. Such complexity was never imagined possible, and even now there are many scientific skeptics who find the idea of such sophisticated communication unsettling.


On Orangutans:
Quote:

... they have been known to do, in the words of one of the leading researchers, Anne Russon, "a multitude of prodigiously intelligent things. They took canoes for rides down the river, for instance. Humans heading upriver might spot one of them cruising down; if humans were surprised, the orangutan just floated nonchalantly by. Orangutans also siphoned fuel, made fires, washed laundry, unlocked doors with keys, weeded paths, untied the most complex knots humans could make, hung hammocks and rode in them, cooked pancakes, and brushed their teeth." Here is an example of an animal who clearly closely observes humans and learns from them.


On Wolves:
Quote:

...raised both wolves and dogs as companion animals (not to be recommended) By watching humans open a door, wolves quickly learned how to turn the knob. His dogs never did.


On the Portia Fimbriata Spider:
Quote:

(Portias eat other spiders) ... When a portia arrives at the web of a spider she wishes to deceive into thinking prey has been caught, she employs and astonishingly sophisticated plan of attack: She plucks the web silk strand, or slaps it, or pulls on it, or flutters it, with one or two or three or any other number of up to ten of her legs [(they use their mouth parts as legs too)], not to mention twitching of her abdomen up and down, and is therefore able to make literally hundreds of thousands of different combinations. Sometimes she tries just about everything without success. Suddenly, one combination gets the attention of the resident spider. She thinks an insect she is used to eating is struggling in her web and approaches. But she can become suspicious and stop. Portia goes through her repertoire again, and the spider is wary, until, bingo, the exact right combination comes up and she slowly moves forward. Portia 'knows' what works, and plays the same combination over and over to lure her victim ever closer, until she comes within striking distance. Then the rightful, but unwary owner of the web is history.

[...] visual hunters rarely let their prey out of sight, but the portia does. Once she realizes (I relish the use of the word here!) that she has been sighted, she takes a long detour, losing visual contact with the web. She has not forgotten what she is after. Rather, she has a plan. She climbs up a nearby tree, moving slowly along a vine growing over the spider's web, which she still cannot see. All this maneuvering can take up to an hour. Then portia drops down on her silk line alongside the web and begins swinging until she is able to grab her unwitting victim (sometimes even another portia -- she has no innate distaste for cannibalism). If we bear in mind that portia has no visual contact -- already an unusual behavior for a spider -- we seem forced to acknowledge that she has a memory. As Jackson has so well put it: "It is difficult to escape the conclusion that Portia solves detour problems in its head, makes plans, and then acts on these plans."

What is extrodinary here is to see a spider, often thought of as a pure automaton, using trial and error (unknown to any other spider). There seems to be no escaping the thought that in portia we have a "thinking" spider; a flexible spider; a spider with a good memory. True, spider brains are only about the size of a pinhead. Yet in their hunting techniques, spiders are nearly as sophisticated as humans.


On Echidnas (Porcupine-like animal from Australia):
Quote:

Captive echidnas have been known to stack drinking containers in a corner to climb out of an escape-proof cage.


Some amazing signs of animal intelligence, eh? Especially in places you'd never think to look for it!
creezalird
i don't orang utan aka jungle man really smart..they look kind of lazy animals to me..
Klaw 2
one of the smartest animals are kea's just look at the video:

http://video.google.nl/videoplay?docid=-9145200269798608663&q=kea&total=1056&start=0&num=10&so=0&type=search&plindex=0
ocalhoun
^Ah, yet another example!
Coclus
That s cool..
ktak1
Truly amazing. I'm sure there are so many more things in this world of animals that we are not aware of that would probably astound us. I think its arrogant and wrong for man to assume that we're the only intelligent ones. Animals just have a very specialized sense of survival and that is definitely tied in with the amount of intelligence and thoughts they have. The clever, intelligent animals are the ones that are constantly aware of their surroundings, able to adapt and thrive.
Bru, stuffce
No surprise that the dolphin is number two behind humans in intelligence. There is a lovely dolphin at Seaworld in Florida, I think, where they have been taught to collect litter from their pool in exchange for a fish. One dolphin finds a big piece of litter and hides it under a rock in the pool and then tears bits off to exchange for fish. She has realised that a small piece of litter gets a fish just as well as a big piece, so she turns litter into currency. Clever girl.
Daisie
Bru, stuffce wrote:
No surprise that the dolphin is number two behind humans in intelligence. There is a lovely dolphin at Seaworld in Florida, I think, where they have been taught to collect litter from their pool in exchange for a fish. One dolphin finds a big piece of litter and hides it under a rock in the pool and then tears bits off to exchange for fish. She has realised that a small piece of litter gets a fish just as well as a big piece, so she turns litter into currency. Clever girl.


Very clever indeed!

To come back to the wolf opening doors, my cat worked that one out too. There is not a door that can stay shut in this house...

The video of the parrot reminded me of the BlueTit birds in the uk who worked out how to take the aluminun cover of the milk bottle (left on door step by the milkman) and then have a wee drink.

But the quote on oranutang really left me speechless as they seem to me too pretty lazy buggers...
Idoru
Nice!

Our dog/puppy (six months) worked out the sliding glassdoor to our garden the other day. He's also worked
out the holes for the cats. Wonder what will be in due time, since trick and intelligence glow in his eyes.
But it's cool with smart animals. Cool
markrc99
I have a real soft spot for squirrels and raccoons. They both have hands and I'm always fascinated watching them. We just got back from a vacation in Wisconsin and on one of the last days a squirrel came up onto the back porch while I was sitting there reading. He gawked at me, circled around a bit and gawked at me again. He circled a second time, looked back and returned the way he came. I suspect he's used to being fed. He was very brazened, I was taken back completely. ...lol...

Anyway, I've always wondered how either of them would be as a pet.
bonestorm74
Yes I'm sure a lot of animals are smarter than we give them credit for.
hiquality
Orangutans ? they have a funny face Smile) Laughing ... and they don't look smart
I agree that wolves are smart Very Happy ... i had 2 wolf pets ( they were brothers ) Cool Cool
hiquality
Orangutans ? they have a funny face Smile) Laughing ... and they don't look smart
I agree that wolves are smart Very Happy ... i had 2 wolf pets ( they were brothers ) Cool Cool ... they even learnde to steal food from the refridgerator Laughing
Ucbet
Nice lists there. Glad Cat was not up there. I hate them so much. They are just useless.
sonicj
I had a dog that could open a door knob.

Also had a dog that had watched a cat catching birds. It was not long before he was doing the same thing. He would crouch down in the grass and slowly move toward the birds and then boom off he went after them....he was pretty fast and would catch them more times than not.
miacps
Very interesting, especially the Prairie Dogs and Orangutans.

I knew Orangs were smart but canoe rides?! That is pretty amazing. I've seen them put on T-shirts at Metro Zoo but thats about it.

My cats are pretty smart. Sometimes they jump up and bat at the door knobs to try to open them. One of the kittens will cling to the door and try to move the handle with it's mouth. I always have the door locked though so they havn't been successful yet. Wink
Related topics
My Signatures
Yo se poco español XD
does 31337sp34k make you giddy?
was Hitler a Christian?
Oil costs messing with US trade
Are atheists more likely to be fellons?
Animal Rights
Letter from MAJOR GENERAL (DR.) VERNON CHONG
What?!?!?!
Are there any limits to religion?
New laptop! Set up a dual boot for japes, here's how it went
Virgin Birth - No.3 in the series 'Dogma for beginners'
The Sunday Assembly has arrived in Australia
Why the bible cannot be inerrant.
Reply to topic    Frihost Forum Index -> Lifestyle and News -> Hobbies and Animals

FRIHOST HOME | FAQ | TOS | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | SITE MAP
© 2005-2011 Frihost, forums powered by phpBB.