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How difficult is it to keep a cat as a pet?





tidruG
I haven't had a pet ever, but I've really wanted one for quite some time. I live on the top floor of an independent house with no garden, no backyard, and not a lot of free space (India is congested, no?). So, I more or less ruled out getting a dog. (Also, my mum and sister are not particularly fond of dogs). Lately, I've been thinking of getting a kitty, but my dad says they're really messy animals. Since I'm away at college for about 12 hours a day (including most Saturdays), it'll be up to my mum mostly to look after it and clean up after it. So... cat-owners... answer:
  1. For a first-time pet owner, how difficult will it be to raise a cat and which breed would I be better off with?
  2. Are cats really messy or can they be potty-trained, etc?
  3. How much time do I need to spend with it? Do I need to take it out for exercise?
  4. How often do I need to take it to a vet? Do cats need any vaccinations, etc?
  5. Do cats need free/open spaces, or would a pretty big 2-bedroom house suffice?
  6. What un-foreseen expenses would be associated with keeping a cat?

Thanks for your input Smile
MrBlueSky
tidruG wrote:
I haven't had a pet ever, but I've really wanted one for quite some time. I live on the top floor of an independent house with no garden, no backyard, and not a lot of free space (India is congested, no?). So, I more or less ruled out getting a dog. (Also, my mum and sister are not particularly fond of dogs). Lately, I've been thinking of getting a kitty, but my dad says they're really messy animals. Since I'm away at college for about 12 hours a day (including most Saturdays), it'll be up to my mum mostly to look after it and clean up after it. So... cat-owners... answer:
  1. For a first-time pet owner, how difficult will it be to raise a cat and which breed would I be better off with?
  2. Are cats really messy or can they be potty-trained, etc?
  3. How much time do I need to spend with it? Do I need to take it out for exercise?
  4. How often do I need to take it to a vet? Do cats need any vaccinations, etc?
  5. Do cats need free/open spaces, or would a pretty big 2-bedroom house suffice?
  6. What un-foreseen expenses would be associated with keeping a cat?

Thanks for your input Smile


I have had cats as a pet, so I'll give it a try:

1. Most cats are really easy and easy-going as pets, especially compared to dogs. Dogs need a lot of attention and need to be trained and properly raised. Cats on the other hand do not need much attention and they virtually raise themselves. They also tend to develop their character and behaviour in a way which fits the situation: if you give the kitten a lot of attention, play with it a lot, take it on your lap, etc. it will get used to it and it will like it. If you, on the other hand, do not give the kitten much attention and do not pet it often, it will be oke with that too and when it is an adult it won't need much attention or even dislike being petted.

2. Most kittens which have lived the first two months after their birth with a mother which is potty-trained will have already been potty-trained by their mother. The only thing they need to learn when they arrive at your place is where they are supposed to do it.
Two good ways to learn them to use their litterbox are:
* when they drop their stuff somewhere outside the litterbox (which is bound to happen a few times) immediately take them up, carry him to the litterbox and put him on it. Most kittens will need a few times and then they know where to go.
* or: when they drop their stuff somewhere, they will probably use that spot the next time too. So you put the litterbox exactly at the that spot. Changes are the next time they will go to the same spot , and find the litterbox. After they have done it in the litterbox a few times, they are familiar with it and you can safely move it to the place you want it to be, and the kitten will find it (maybe with a little help the first time)

3. You definitely not have to take your kitten or cat out for excercise. A cat can grow up home-bound without ever getting outside without problems, as long as it is used to it from early age. How much time you spend with your kitten depends on what you want. They don't mind it if you play with them all day, they also don't mind if you leave it alone all day. But when they really want attention, they know how to get it. They will follow you around the house and climb your legs, etc.

4. When they are young, kittens must get some vaccinations against common diseases. After that you probably want to take your cat to the vet about once or twice a year for checkups and vaccacinations.

5. They don't need much space or open spaces, except when they are used to it. Taking an adult cat which is used to a lot of room and freedom into a small house is not a good idea.

6. As for expenses: of course you need foot (although cats like it when you give them 'soft' luxery food it is better for their health - and cheaper - to give them dry food. It is better for their teeth and for their digestion). And litter. The only unforseen costs are when your cat gets sick and you have to take it to the vet a lot.
tidruG
Wow, thanks for that very detailed reply.
Your posts certainly gives me some more confidence to actively pursue trying to get a little cat for myself.
You have certainly reinforced some of my assumptions, and also told me of some things I was not aware of earlier.
I'll remember to keep in mind your tips about the litterbox. Smile
ocalhoun
^Some more tips out of my experience:
*Cats instinctively want to bury their droppings. Right after taking one home, pick it up and put it in the litter box. Often, the cat will remember where it is, and have no problems. (Cleaning out the litter box is an odious chore, though.)
*If you have to change the type of food you give it, do so gradually, mixing the old with the new. This will help prevent the cat from being sick on the carpet and furniture.
*If you want to play with it, but your are feeling lethargic, use a laser pointer. Most cats will have a great time (and get lots of exercise) chasing the little red dot around (dogs too).
*Consider going to the pound/animal shelter (or your local equivalent) to get a cat. Often the sweetest, best behaved cats are the ones that have been abused/neglected in the past. (From observing things about my cat, I conclude she was abandoned in the woods with her brothers and sisters in a box. (She, and a few others looking just like her, found us in the woods and went home with us. Also, she has an un-catlike fear of boxes, boots, and anything resembling a club or pole) Despite all this, she is the nicest, most affectionate cat I've ever seen.)
tidruG
Alright... another thing I needed to ask...
What do I need to put in the litter-box and how do I clean it up, and how big a litter box do I need to buy?

My assumption so far has been that I need to fill up the box with sand, and everytime it needs to be cleaned up, I need to get fresh sand?
ocalhoun
I don't know about finding it in India, but most grocery stores here sell kitty litter. It's made from clay, and is made to clump up around moisture. Every so often (depending on size of box and size/number of cats) you use a large spoon with holes in it to sift out all the clumps. Occasionally you have to add more, since removing the clumps removes some litter.
They also sell a different type, which absorbs moisture, and you only scoop out the crap. But since this, like sand, absorbs the urine, it'll start to smell very bad very quickly and force you to change out the whole box often.

You could use ordinary sand, but I would only suggest it if you have a convenient source of sand and a resistance to strong smells. (Most commercial kitty litters also include air fresheners right in the mix)
MrBlueSky
Yes, what ocalhoun says. Sand isn't very practical. Although the cat would like it, you probably don't.

About the size: it doesn't have to be very large. As long as an adult cat can turn around in it and sit in it without folding itself in weird ways it should be oke. You can also use a a little plastic box without roof when it is still a kitten and decide later what kind of litterbox you want.

The important thing is the little critter doesn't have to sit in his own poop. Of course it takes some discipline to clean it out on time. I once waited much too long before cleaning, and at some moment my cat goes to the litterbox, looks in it for a while, turns around and poops in front of the box instead of in it. Very Happy Of course I couldn't be mad at him, because it was my own fault. Embarassed
jharsika
All cats are different though, no matter how they are raised they have certain personalities. Make sure you get your cat fixed (if it's a male neutered, female spayed; meaning it can't reproduce anymore). This gets rid of a few annoying behavior problems (spraying, being in heat, agressiveness). I think the most expenses a cat racks up are when you first get it, for shots and fixing it etc.

Some people use wood shavings for cat litter. It just has to be something you can either clean out by scooping out the poop and stuff, or by completely emptying the box every couple of days depending on how much stuff is in it. Average size box is less than 2 feet by less than one foot.

About litter training, a lot of cats already are. Once though, I got a kitten and every time she went on the floor I ran and put her in the litter box, she got the point after about three times. Smile

Be careful, if you get a long haired cat their fur will shed everywhere in the heat. They need to be brushed more often than short-haired cats (who don't actually need to be brushed, but most like it).

About excercise, I hope the cat would at least have a bit of room to run around and climb on things, they can go crazy from boredom. When bored or stressed cats can become overweight, underweight, depressed, or simply over-groom themselves. A cat only needs like 1/2 a cup of food twice a day. You can just feed it when it's hungry and they get into the habit of eating all of it right away, or you can leave food for it to eat whenever it wants to. Remember: Never feed a cat onions, they're poisonous to them. Also, a cat cannot survive without protein in it's diet so don't try to give it non-store bought food.

About being messy, depending on the situation, they can be. Some cats like to scratch furniture and wooden doorframes and stuff to sharpen their claws, but just spray them with water when they do things you don't like and they can be trained.

This is probably too much information....sorry, hope it helps though and doesn't discourage you. I just want to make sure you know what you are getting into.

PS I love cats, I just don't think they should be taken too lightly.
tidruG
Once again, thanks for all the inputs :D

Quote:
You could use ordinary sand, but I would only suggest it if you have a convenient source of sand and a resistance to strong smells. (Most commercial kitty litters also include air fresheners right in the mix)
Then I really suppose sand isn't an option for me. I do not have a convenient source of sand... I'll have to look around and find some cat-owners and ask them what they generally do.

Quote:
You can also use a a little plastic box without roof when it is still a kitten and decide later what kind of litterbox you want.
How old do you think a kitten should be before I get one? Would it be a good idea to wait till one's old enough to be litterbox-trained by its mom?

Quote:
Of course it takes some discipline to clean it out on time. I once waited much too long before cleaning, and at some moment my cat goes to the litterbox, looks in it for a while, turns around and poops in front of the box instead of in it. Very Happy Of course I couldn't be mad at him, because it was my own fault.
That's a good example of advice in the form of personal experience. I'll keep this is mind :D

Quote:
About being messy, depending on the situation, they can be. Some cats like to scratch furniture and wooden doorframes and stuff to sharpen their claws, but just spray them with water when they do things you don't like and they can be trained.
Hmmm... it's a good thing then that most of our furniture is not expensive. It's cane, which we bought for temporary use, but haven't really bothered to change. Doors aren't fantastically carved either. The only problem would be to make sure the little animal doesn't poop on the beds or on the carpet.

Quote:
Be careful, if you get a long haired cat their fur will shed everywhere in the heat.
If I do get a cat, it would probably be a pretty average-sized (or a smaller-sized) one without too much hair :P

Quote:
About excercise, I hope the cat would at least have a bit of room to run around and climb on things,
Oh, I reckon that won't be a problem. The house I live in is pretty big... about 2000sft. And I also reckon I'd have to buy some toys for the cat... like rubber mice or something?

Quote:
Remember: Never feed a cat onions, they're poisonous to them.
Ah, more things I didn't know... I suppose I'll mostly buy cat food from the store.

Quote:
This is probably too much information....sorry, hope it helps though and doesn't discourage you. I just want to make sure you know what you are getting into.
No amount of information is too much information. And I want to be pretty sure what I'm getting myself into as well. I've seen my cousins get a couple of really cute Labrador puppies. Unfortunately, they weren't really very careful, so the pups ate something they shouldn't have and died Sad
They also got a couple of German Shepherds later, but after they grew into adults, my cousins realized that those dogs are too big for them Razz, so they gave them away as well.


EDIT:
And another really important question:
>> What are the responsibilities that you have once you get a cat?
example : How often do you have to bathe it?
How often do you have to clean out the litterbox, and how odious a chore is it?
If you go away on a holiday away from home, who takes care of the pet?
Is it possible for a single dude (who's never had any pet before), who's away at college for about 12 hours a day, to take care of it almost single-handedly?
It's of utmost importance to me to make sure that I can handle the responsibility of keeping a pet, and making sure that I'm not messing up another life...
MrBlueSky
tidruG wrote:

Quote:
You can also use a a little plastic box without roof when it is still a kitten and decide later what kind of litterbox you want.
How old do you think a kitten should be before I get one? Would it be a good idea to wait till one's old enough to be litterbox-trained by its mom?


I think you can wait until you find you really need one. It depends on the situation, probably.

Quote:

And another really important question:
>> What are the responsibilities that you have once you get a cat?


The ones I can think of right now:

  • Feeding the cat. When you use dry food you can make sure he always has something to eat (so he can eat when he wants) by filling his feeding bowl (? don't know what the english word is) once a day. Make sure he always has fresh water.
  • Cleaning his litterbox. How often depends on the situation.
  • Looking after his health. Just be alert about warning signs like extreme scratching, red eyes, apathy, not eating or drinking and other things which can point to a health problem.
  • Giving the cat your love and attention.


Quote:

example : How often do you have to bathe it?


The cat breed which is most common over here is the European Shorthair. They have short hair and you don't have to bathe them. I don't know about other (long-haired) breeds, but cats in general are very hygenic and spend a lot of time cleaning themselves.

Quote:

How often do you have to clean out the litterbox, and how odious a chore is it?


It depends on the size of the litterbox and the kind of filling you use. The more often you clean it, the less odious a chore it is. I would say you will have to clean it (emptying it, rinsing with water and filling it with new filling) about once a week, but other people will think it should be done more often or less often.

Quote:

If you go away on a holiday away from home, who takes care of the pet?


That's an important issue. Because you need someone who will take care of your cat when you go away longer than a day. There are several options:
* A family member, friend of neighbor who will visit your home to feed the cat.
* Someone (most propably another cat owner) who will take your cat in his/her house for the duration of your vacation.
* There are animal hotels which will take care of your pet (Expensive but comfortable). And a lot of animal shelters also have room for pets which owners are on vacation (Less expensive, but less comfortable for your cat).
* Taking your pet with you when you go on vacation. This takes some planning and preparation, but you don't have the burden of leaving it behind and finding someone to take care of it. I always took the last cat I had everywhere I was going, whether it was a visit to family for a few days or a vacation.
* I also know people who, when going away for a few days, leave their cat alone at home with enough food and water. I would not do it myself, and some cat lovers will have strong opinions against it. But if it works out oke, and the cat doesn't seem to have a problem with it, it's probably oke.

Quote:

Is it possible for a single dude (who's never had any pet before), who's away at college for about 12 hours a day, to take care of it almost single-handedly?


Yes, I think that should be no problem.
tidruG
Cool, thanks again for all the inputs.
I'm a lot more confident about getting a cat now, though I still have to find out about litter-boxes and litter.
Dad says he doesn't mind if I'd like to get a dog either, provided it's not too big or too delicate or requires too much attention to take care of.

I'll keep you all updated.
Idoru
I feel that I have to put a post here not so positive to the idea. Nothing personal, but also based on experience.
I'm 32 yrs of age, live with 5 cats, a dog and 3 rabbits. For the moment we also have 5 kittens.

To start with, there is the fact that getting a pet is a big responsibillity. You seem willing to take that based on your
posts here, but the question is if your able to, beeing away from home as much as 12 hours a day, 6 days a week?
The real responsibillity would be put on your parents, who aren't to found of the idea, as I understand?
Second point is about how adjustablle the cat/kitten is. Sure, they are independent animals that can get around
without too much attention, but they also have needs. 'Problematic cats' are often bored, due to too little attention,
hunt or other stuff to do. They tend to use their claws on furniture, carpets and other things. In really bad cases
they also get mean and bossy. Often 'forget' their potty-training.

So, at the end, I advice you not to get a cat for pet untill you have more time to devote to him/her. Better in your
curren position would be a less domestic animal, such as a reptile, fish, spider etc. Not the same thing, I know,
but better of left by itself that much.

If you still insist on getting a cat/kitten, you should not get one younger than 12 weeks. It's around that age that
the mother start to cut them loose. And, for the cats sake, you shouldn't get one, but two cats. That way they will
not get loonley and boored just because you aren't around.

But, as I said, reconsider, and bring your parents in to the decision. It will be they who gets a pet.
Arnie
You could be lucky. Some cats are ideal. But most have at least one little flaw: some pee on clothes, others strike you at random, others throw up all the time, and others start screaming when you don't give them attention. Mine seem to do all Wink
Coclus
Normally fairly easy I would say.. well as long as you don't go on vacation too much..
tidruG
@Idoru,
You're right. That's one of the reasons I've put it off for now.
My mum isn't really too fussed about it, to be honest. And she's a housewife, so I reckon it's not likely that the kitten will get lonely.

However, I'm just going to take things a little slow. Thanks for the advice.
virre
This is based a bit of my experince, a lot on my girlfriends experience as a volounter at a cat-shelter (where I have been too)

MrBlueSky wrote:

* Someone (most propably another cat owner) who will take your cat in his/her house for the duration of your vacation.
* There are animal hotels which will take care of your pet (Expensive but comfortable). And a lot of animal shelters also have room for pets which owners are on vacation (Less expensive, but less comfortable for your cat).


No Please don't to this. Cats are verry bound to their territory and will probably react negativly if they are moved from it, espacally two times. Yes people to it, but the question is if it is good for the cat...

Idarou has some valid points, espcally about the when and how many.

And please try to get one from a shelter, I doubt the situation for cats are better in India then in Sweden, and here it is horrible, and what ever you do Neuter them. Please.

If the cats are in all the time you must also fix their claws or nails or what it's called, (if they are out the nature takes its tool on it). You might consider building somekind of climbing device for them. Mygirlfriend took parts of trees and build one with string on her neted balcony (hens-net around it for the cats security)
Dalv87
tidruG wrote:
What un-foreseen expenses would be associated with keeping a cat?

If you decide you want more than one, I'd suggest getting younger ones at the same time. We adopted two sister kittens about eight years ago and they get along fine, but two years ago we took in a third adult cat and she hasn't been getting along with the others at all.

And don't worry about bathing them, cats deal with that themselves. One of ours sometimes even gets done washing herself and tries to wash me, which is why my wrist is covered in cat saliva right now. Cute but somewhat gross.
tidruG
virre, I don't think there are cat hotels in India. If at all I do go out of town on a vacation, I'd probably have no other choice than to leave it with my aunt who lives a couple floors below us.

However, like I said, I don't think I'm going to be getting one any time soon... have to put it on hold because of certain things. I'll keep all your advice in mind when I'm about to get one.

Dalv87, the plan is to get a kitten, not a cat, so yes, I'd definitely try to look for one that's young Smile
Idoru
tidruG wrote:
@Idoru,
You're right. That's one of the reasons I've put it off for now.
My mum isn't really too fussed about it, to be honest. And she's a housewife, so I reckon it's not likely that the kitten will get lonely.

However, I'm just going to take things a little slow. Thanks for the advice.


I'm glad to hear. And I gotto say that you've gathered a lot of useful info if your situation changes. For living with
cats is one of the most wonderful things you can do. They are not only adorable animals, but intelligent and
mysterious creatures.

@virre fun to see a fellow Swede here with the same line of interest. Smile Hope you put up a homepage.
Let me know.
tidruG
Quote:
I gotto say that you've gathered a lot of useful info if your situation changes.
You're right. I'll keep a reference to this thread. I've learnt plenty of new things, and I'm still quite confident that I can handle a cat if I ever get one. Smile
LukeZone
When you first get your cat, you’ll need to spend about $25 for a litter box, $10 for a collar, and $30 for a carrier. Food runs about $170 a year, plus $50 annually for toys and treats, $175 annually for litter and an average of $150 for veterinary care every year. The best place to get a cat? Your local shelter! Please visit our shelter directory to find shelters and rescue groups in your area.

Note: Make sure you have all your supplies (see our checklist) before you bring your new pet home.
bonestorm74
There are a few expenses associated with cats, as other people have mentioned. Overall it's not too bad. As for behaviour etc, you can go with a breed that has a noted good temperament, but often it will come down to the individual cat and/or environmental factors.

For example we bought two Burmese kittens. Now Burmese are a breed that is noted for having great temperaments. They are quite placid and loving most of the time. However we had a situation where neighbourhood cats started coming into our yard and marking their territory, and this drove our cats nuts (they were confined to the house on the advice of the breeder, due to poor survival skills). Our cats began spraying ALL over the house. I mean everywhere and on everything. This persisted for the best part of the year, despite us trying every suggestion on the internet it seemed. Finally we let them outside through the use of a cat door and the behaviour has improved a lot. But it just goes to show you never know what might happen.
tidruG
Well, I've had to put this on hold due to certain developments at home.
If and when I am about to get one, I will certainly post in here again.
furtasacra
tidruG wrote:
Cool, thanks again for all the inputs.
I'm a lot more confident about getting a cat now, though I still have to find out about litter-boxes and litter.
Dad says he doesn't mind if I'd like to get a dog either, provided it's not too big or too delicate or requires too much attention to take care of.

I'll keep you all updated.


PLEASE don't get a dog, all dogs require a LOT of attention and training. If you MUST have a pet, and don't have a lot of time, a cat is better.

An untrained dog is a horrible rotten evil beast. Untrained dogs poop on your sofa and rip the faces off your neighbor's children. They will eat your favorite shoes and barf them back up in front of the bathroom door at 4am, so you step into a pool of chunky lukewarm leather dog vomit when you try to go brush your teeth before work.

Dogs bad, unless you have a LOT of spare time.
noisette
Quote:
all dogs require a LOT of attention and training.


Agree.
The best and worst thing about cats is that they are too independent. If you dont have lots of spare time, choose cats.
Not all of the cats are that cool.. in fact when they are young, cats could be very intimate to you. And cats love to keep themselves clean. So dont worry too much about this.

Personally, I love cats best for their personality is so strong. You never know what is in their mind. To predict what they would do next?Just forget it. You'll never know. And that is why cats are so attractive.
furtasacra
noisette wrote:
Quote:
all dogs require a LOT of attention and training.


Agree.
The best and worst thing about cats is that they are too independent. If you dont have lots of spare time, choose cats.
Not all of the cats are that cool.. in fact when they are young, cats could be very intimate to you. And cats love to keep themselves clean. So dont worry too much about this.

Personally, I love cats best for their personality is so strong. You never know what is in their mind. To predict what they would do next?Just forget it. You'll never know. And that is why cats are so attractive.


I love my cats, and fussed over them like a mama when they were babies, so now they think I'm their mama for real. They follow me around, and do what I tell them, most of the time. I thought it was strange until I watched a PBS show about the similarities between domestic cats and big cats. My little fluffmuffins act a lot like lion cubs, only they think I'M the lioness. They hiss at people I don't like, and stand guard over me when I don't feel well. Cats are the best, if you can handle scooping the kitty litter every day for the next 20 years.
Studio Madcrow
Cats are pretty easy to keep. Just make sure thet have:

a. A clean litter box
b. Food to eat
c. A CRT monitor to sleep on

and they'll be happy (at least as happy as a cat can be)
Bondings
A cat isn't very hard to keep as a pet, at least compared to a dog or other animals. It doesn't need as much attention and is way easier to take on vacation or pass to a friend during vacation.
Bigeezii
1. For a first-time pet owner, how difficult will it be to raise a cat and which breed would I be better off with?
2. Are cats really messy or can they be potty-trained, etc?
easily
3. How much time do I need to spend with it? Do I need to take it out for exercise?
1/2 hour a day
4. How often do I need to take it to a vet? Do cats need any vaccinations, etc?
once a year?
5. Do cats need free/open spaces, or would a pretty big 2-bedroom house suffice?
not really just a decent size area
6. What un-foreseen expenses would be associated with keeping a cat?
it ripping up your furniture.
furtasacra
About cats... I love my cats. I have had pet cats for almost 20 years, and to me, a home isn't really a home without a cat in it. Most of the things I would say about cat ownership have already been addressed in this thread except for one: sudden horrible expenses.

Over the years, two of my cats have developed urinary tract problems. It's kind of like kidney stones in a human. If your pet develops urinary tract problems, and you let it go untreated, they will die a horrible, agonizingly painful death. It costs an average of $300-400 USD for veterinary care for feline urinary tract blockage, not including antibiotics for aftercare. The nasty part is you probably won't know something is wrong until the poor creature is at death's door, because most cats are fastidious and won't start piddling tiny telltale trickles of blood in front of you in the middle of the living room until they're half dead. Then you have to rush them to the vet to get a catheter inserted before their bladder explodes and they die from internal hemorrhaging, which hurts a lot worse than a catheter up the weewee.

But this problem can be easily avoided. NEVER feed your cat cheap generic food. Or table scraps. Too much salt. Cheap cat food seems to trigger urinary tract problems. It's cheaper in the long run to buy the good stuff.

And when I say long run, I'm not kidding. A well-cared-for cat will be with you for fifteen years or more, which is something else to consider, if you want a pet. That cuddly kitten is not just a cute little fuzzball, it's a long-term commitment.
tidruG
Quote:
That cuddly kitten is not just a cute little fuzzball, it's a long-term commitment.

Hehe, that's a nice way to put it.
I'll keep that in mind, thanks.
Idoru
Bigeezii wrote:
1. For a first-time pet owner, how difficult will it be to raise a cat and which breed would I be better off with?
2. Are cats really messy or can they be potty-trained, etc?
easily
3. How much time do I need to spend with it? Do I need to take it out for exercise?
1/2 hour a day
4. How often do I need to take it to a vet? Do cats need any vaccinations, etc?
once a year?
5. Do cats need free/open spaces, or would a pretty big 2-bedroom house suffice?
not really just a decent size area
6. What un-foreseen expenses would be associated with keeping a cat?
it ripping up your furniture.


I've got a feeling those questions already got answered in various post's in this thread, but for the order of it:

1. Provided your willing to learn and foremost spend time with the cat, not to hard. Any breed is good, but it
can be a good idea to get a short-hair. Long or semi-long fur demand some attention that can be difficult. It's also
nice if you have someone around you with a bit of experience that you can ask questions.
2. If a kitten isn't already potty-trained when you get it, there is something wrong with the breeder. The "mess"
you will have to put up with is that they spread hair on your furniture and clothing, and sometimes puke fur-balls.
3. It's more a question of spending time at home, reading, watching tellie, or whatever you do, and the cat will
come to you for cuddling, etc. Still, you should count on putting down a half an hour to an hour every week
for cutting claws and such. Checking food and cleaning the litter-boxes is also about 15 minutes a day.
4. Vaccinations depends on if you're going to have it indoors or outdoors. Indoors it's enough with a vaccination every
other year. Outdoors it's once a year. Also, if your going to compeat with it, it's atleast once a year. Seeing the vet. is
individual. If the cat's fine, there's no reason to see the vet other then when you vaccinate.
5. Open spaces is not necessary, the house described should be sufficiant. Some stick to climb and sharpen the claws
at is necessary, unless you wish that to be done on the sofa and the walls. You can teach the cat where it's ok
to claw and where it's not.
6. Get the cat insured, and you will not have any unforseen expences.
redwolves
tidruG wrote:
I haven't had a pet ever, but I've really wanted one for quite some time. I live on the top floor of an independent house with no garden, no backyard, and not a lot of free space (India is congested, no?). So, I more or less ruled out getting a dog. (Also, my mum and sister are not particularly fond of dogs). Lately, I've been thinking of getting a kitty, but my dad says they're really messy animals. Since I'm away at college for about 12 hours a day (including most Saturdays), it'll be up to my mum mostly to look after it and clean up after it. So... cat-owners... answer:
  1. For a first-time pet owner, how difficult will it be to raise a cat and which breed would I be better off with?
  2. Are cats really messy or can they be potty-trained, etc?
  3. How much time do I need to spend with it? Do I need to take it out for exercise?
  4. How often do I need to take it to a vet? Do cats need any vaccinations, etc?
  5. Do cats need free/open spaces, or would a pretty big 2-bedroom house suffice?
  6. What un-foreseen expenses would be associated with keeping a cat?

Thanks for your input Smile


well
1 cats are easy to raise but they are hard in an apartment i think becaus they want to get out
2well no excersise is needed but you need to spend alittle time with it so it does not get scared of you
3a cat can be vacinatet and it can be castratet but that is the only time i have been to the vet eith my cat so not to much if it doent get sick
4well i think it would be best if it was outdorrs but since you live in an apartment it would be pretty hard exept altans but you can get cats that wants to be indoor
5well a cat needs food in the beginning you can buy enything for it but then it only wants one thing and then later another and another and it walways changes what it likes to eat. and you can get it pet toys it does only like one toy at a time. you will need a box for it to shit in and a water and a food dish for it.
hope you can use some of it
by the way you can get a cat line for walking with cats Razz
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