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Hibernate or ShutDown?





akshar
I am working on winXP with 128mb ram system.I hibernate my pc after my work.It takes 120mb memory to keep status and also less time to load and to shut down.When i again start my PC and try to connect modem via phone it shows message that modem is busy.This means that modem swith has not shut off.This doesnt occurs when i shut dwn and restart pc. Are there any other hazards of hibernating PC ?can it harm my PC anyway?
brokenadvice
Just shut down. The same amount of strain (minimal, yet it adds up over time) is put on the power supply. The writing/ erasing of 120mb is probably also fragmenting your harddrive. Just use stand by for 1-2 hours, and if you are going to be gone longer than that, shut down.
Magicman
Personally I leave my computer on almost all of the time. I turn off the monitor and put it in stand-by usually. It runs fine and there is no discernible slowdown because it is left on.
indianinworld
If it is working properly after restart then these may be the problems that i know.

There are chances that you might be using a local modem which is not tested properly with the respective drivers with the respective Operating Systems.

Or

When the PC is hybernated, and started again - the computer program may start from the previous state and identify the phone / modem again in ALIVE state which makes the system to display the message as "Busy".
indianinworld
What difference does it make you to shutdown and restart again ?

It is always better to shutdown and restart or just leave the PC as it is for future use, rather than hybernating and restarting the session again.
It usually eats up resources and if you use heavy RAM eating applications, you might not be satisfied with the performance.
MeddlingMonk
I would recommend shutting down your PC and restarting it later when you need it again. Hibernating eats a lot of resources (and given the fact that you've only got 128MB RAM) and, depending on the speed of your computer, may be just as time-consuming as shutting down and restarting.
soulery
Wow. I didn't know that Hibernating your computer can mess it up.

That's it, I'm never clicking hibernate ever again. Even though I will have to save everything instead of leaving it on.
SgtGarcia
Basicly the idea behind hibernating is quite simple. Windows suspends all processes, then copies the content of the RAM to your hardrive (you can see a file called hiberfile.sys on your windows drive). Then it shuts down the computer, once you turn on the computer again it restores the data from the harddisk to the ram and continues all the processes.
Some processes don't work well when they are resumed after coming back from hibernation. You can prevent problems by closing these processes before hibernating the pc. Then there shouldn't be too many problems.
A computer in hibernation doesn't use more power then a computer that's turned completely off.
qscomputing
It's important to remember the difference between "hibernate" (suspend to disk) and "sleep" (suspend to RAM).

Suspending to disk copies your memory to the disk and shuts down the computer. When you boot up again, the operating system's notices the presence of a RAM image on disk and loads that back up, restoring your session as it was before you shut down. The advantage is much faster boot, and you can resume working on whatever was open when you turned off the computer. The disadvantage: it works the hard-disk a bit harder, though this is probably counteracted by the fact that you don't have to load everything that runs at normal boot-time, so that's probably a negligible factor. As a previous poster pointed out, it may result in disk fragmentation under Windows - but not in other systems that use a swap partition; the memory image is saved to the swap partition rather than the main partition, thus the main partition does not get fragmented by hibernating. Linux would be a good example.

Personally, I always turn off my laptop (running Ubuntu Linux) to hibernate, rather than a full shut-down. But in Windows you will certainly want to run a full reboot frequently, so you might as well just shut down fully.
ssthanapati
well i used 2 do the same thing wen i had 128 mb ram.... it wrks pretty fine without ne prob... I used 2 hibernate abt 10 to 15 times until i used u perform a shutdown... wrked pretty well for me and saved a lotta time too Smile
Hogwarts
soulery wrote:
Wow. I didn't know that Hibernating your computer can mess it up.

That's it, I'm never clicking hibernate ever again. Even though I will have to save everything instead of leaving it on.

That's like saying..
The Y2K bug is going to eat my harddrive, so I won't ever turn on my computer again from fear of losing all my documents!
or
Good lord! When I'm using my computer, I might stuff it up! That's it, I'm never using my computer again!

Seriously, if it's going to take time to stuff it up (I.e. 4/5 years, and that still would require you to do it.. alot.. every day) who cares? Computers are progressing in leaps and bounds - so it's not going to matter by then, because you'll have a new computer. Besides, whether you like it or not, it'll more then likely stuff up of its own accord.
ganesh
If you are having only 128 MB of RAM, it is actually easier to hibernate than is the case for, say, a computer with 1 GB RAM to hibernate.

Your problem is due to the fact that dial up networking is still active when you enter hibernate mode. At the time of hibernation, your PC and RAM thinks that the modem is active and continues to maintain that status. When you get out of hibernation, your PC continues from that state, and tries to continue using the modem. In reality, though, once you hibernate, the PC powers down, and the power to the modem is lost. The modem needs to go through the whole power cycle process in order to be able to connect to the telephone line again. This is exactly the same reason why a shut down of the PC and reboot doesn't cause the problem.

I used to have a dial up connection quite some time back, but now I solely rely on Ethernet. Sometimes, my Ethernet fails when I hibernate and take my laptop to another router and connect to its Ethernet port. That is because, according to the RAM, my connection IP and allocated addresses still belong to the old connection.

You can utilize the hibernate feature in a better manner if you really understand how it works internally!
KHO
Hibernating is a big no-no. It puts too much stress on the hdd and you only have 128MB ram, so everything being cached like that will likely hurt what lilttle ram you do have. I reccommend 1)buy more ram 2) use shut down and disable hibernation
Fake
For some reason, I always restart my system in the morning. it just gives me this feeling that my system has 'woken' up, and all useless stuff has been turned off. Obviously this may not be the case, but that is how i work, restart early morning, and hibernate in between Smile
scofrezo
There may be different opinions about Hibernation, but I think it is a great feauture for laptops (and desktops as well).

Pros:
1) Startup time is faster
2) You start right where you left off
3) Save power

Cons:
1) Hardware compatibility issues

These are just a few items. However, in your situation, I believe you may want to check to see if there is a firmware update for your modem, be sure that your computer is hibernating and not in sleep mode, and check to see if you are still online via modem when hibernating because you may want to disconnect before hibernating.
qscomputing
KHO wrote:
It puts too much stress on the hdd

Really? When I bring up my computer from being fully powered off it works the HD much harder than when I bring it up from suspend-to-disk. Therefore, there is no evidence for that point.

KHO wrote:
and you only have 128MB ram, so everything being cached like that will likely hurt what lilttle ram you do have.

Sorry, I don't follow that. Please explain more clearly.

Some evidence or reasoning for your claims would be useful.
internetjobs
If you hibernate the tread will not end.. so it going on lengthly... thats why the problem i think. restart your computer every time, it is good, because if you hibernate it will take some hdd space
greatfire
I only ever do a true shut down once a week. I always hibernate. 10 second boot rather then 17 seconds, i would say its worth it, it does fragment your hard drive and the less ram youhave the more worthwhile it is. My mendocino (400mhz, 192 ram) takes an eternity to shut down and boot up, hibernate solves that problem, there is effectively no difference between the hibernate times of my pcs.
dac_nip
i usually shutdown when i have the luxury of time to do it. otherwise, hibernate is fine. both has its own advantages but i would prefer shutdown over hibernate.
qscomputing
internetjobs wrote:
if you hibernate it will take some hdd space

Which it will then free when you boot back up again...

That would only be a valid argument on Windows anyway, as Linux saves the memory data to the swap partition, which is completely separate from your main data.

Actually I suppose a regular shutdown on Windows is a good idea - I'm probably just too used to Linux which (almost) never needs rebooting...
orcaz
I seldomly use the hibernate function, and I have disabled that on my desktop. I would rather shutdown if I am away for quite sometime, and use the standby function if it is just a short while.
shutup_alfredo
hibernate slows down pc
cvkien
shutdown mean let your computer to have a good sleep, like human. if hibernate then that mean you put your computer only close her eyes but not rest down their brain. so if this happened to you, which 1 you prefer, after you had work all day long??
tahoestyle
brokenadvice wrote:
Just shut down. The same amount of strain (minimal, yet it adds up over time) is put on the power supply. The writing/ erasing of 120mb is probably also fragmenting your harddrive. Just use stand by for 1-2 hours, and if you are going to be gone longer than that, shut down.


yes it is better to completely shut down after some inactivity of 2hrs or more
Daisie
I never really understood what hibernating was for, first time I did it I couldnt figure out how to start the puter again ( Sad ) so I shut down everytime. Thanks everyone for all the infos Smile
orcaz
cvkien wrote:
shutdown mean let your computer to have a good sleep, like human. if hibernate then that mean you put your computer only close her eyes but not rest down their brain. so if this happened to you, which 1 you prefer, after you had work all day long??

This description is better used to describe standby instead... hibernate is basically similar to shutdown as it completely powers off your PC, but just tt it leaves the RAM image on ur disk.
fadirocks
Standby sucks but Hibernate is good Very Happy

My lappy runs 24hr and last time I restarted was because of an update and i think I did that a month ago or so Razz.

But when I used to move my lappy around I used the hibernate, it works pretty fast for me & windows doesn't look has suffered anything!!! I think I saved alot of battery time too!!!

That HD stress over hibernate total BS,

Quote:
Pros:
1) Startup time is faster
2) You start right where you left off
3) Save power

Cons:
1) Hardware compatibility issues


totally agree on that
vikash
hibernation is better than standby. Me too using Hibernation for my lappy.
infobankr
Suspend (S3) is way better than hibernation (S4), but it doesn't always work.

I used to leave my computer on all the time, but electricity prices are too high!

Now I'm planning on sleeping my machines as much as possible, but using a laptop hard drive as I've heard they are designed to start up and stop many more times (100,000) than a regular hard drive (40,000). If someone can confirm that, I'd appreciate it!
[FuN]goku
i use hibernate on my laptop, 'NEVER' on my pc, the only reason i use it on my laptop is because for one, it uses less power from the battery to turn it on from hibernate, and also im lazy so, hibernate resume is quicker lol... sometimes i go a week or more without actually rebooting.
Liques
I never tried hibernate. There is this option in Linux too?
[FuN]goku
Liques wrote:
I never tried hibernate. There is this option in Linux too?
Uhm, yeah i believe so. i dont use hibernate on linux on my laptop tho.. i only used it with xp.
Dwyer17
Question.

There are two types of standby
the one where everything is saved to the RAM and everything is shut off
and the kind where the comuter remains turned on (harddrives still on etc) but it's just in standby mode


which is better
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