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Can Wild Animals Be Domesticated





Bannik
like the topic says can wild animals be domesticated, everyday i read something about a women or a man coexisting with dangerous wild animals, monks living with tigers, a siberian hunter who lives with a bear, Indian boy with a pet giant elephant the list goes on......

but the question remain can Wild animals be domesticated to live with humans without the risk of danger (note: risks always exists even with normal domesticated cats and dots but its small) can they both be small.....so can a giant grizzly be domesticated?
gh0stface
It's not unheardd of man to domesticate animals. Domesticating animals has begun since a loooooooong time ago. If you take a look around, we've already domesticated quite a few animals. We have domesticated the dog which is related to the wolf, cats which are related to the bigger cats, domesticated goats, sheep, essentially cattle.

It seems some animals are more easier to tame than others. Domesticating larger cats and bears are a little more scarier than dogs and cats. These types of animals out weigh you ten folds and are strong than us by a lot and a re a lot scarier if they are angry or in a pissy mood. :o
Drawingguy
The way you worded your topic, you wrote as if coexisting with the animals meant domesticating them. I don't think that they are necessarily the same. Coexisting is more of a 'I'll give you your space, you'll give me mine,' while domesticated/tamed animals are generally subservient ('broken'-if you're cynical) creatures.
Bannik
Drawingguy wrote:
The way you worded your topic, you wrote as if coexisting with the animals meant domesticating them. I don't think that they are necessarily the same. Coexisting is more of a 'I'll give you your space, you'll give me mine,' while domesticated/tamed animals are generally subservient ('broken'-if you're cynical) creatures.


what I was aiming for is can these animals ever be pets and partners like a dog or a cat.
ocalhoun
Bannik wrote:

what I was aiming for is can these animals ever be pets and partners like a dog or a cat.

Occasionally, when the population gets too high, the US government will round up some of the wild mustangs in places where they are still free. (Otherwise they would get overpopulated, and possibly starve) These horses end up with private owners who tame and train them.
The point is that even animals that are much larger and more powerful than humans are routinely taken out of the wild and domesticated.
(Though there are always tell-tale signs of a horse that was raised wild and tamed, such as: most domestic horses are finicky about their water; wild-raised horses have learned to drink whenever they have an opportunity, wild horses learn to be quiet to avoid calling attention to the herd; they won't whinny as much or as loudly as domestic horses.)

A lot depends on the disposition of the animal in question. Horses are used to working in groups and taking orders from their superiors in the herd, so they are relitively easy to tame. A grizzly bear that is used to working alone and mauling anything that tries to stop it would be much more difficult to tame.
Dark_Tiger
It really depends on what you mean by domsitication and for that matter wild.

Can you take a truly wild animal and expect it to act like a pet you picked up at the shop last week? No. Even herd and pack animals like wolves or deer are unlikely to reconize a human as a pack leader and if they do, they are just as likely to challange you for dominance.

Taking a wild animal and making a pet out of it requires a lot of genetic manipulation (breeding). There are attempts to cross breed wild species with domesticated ones to get a "pet" demenor with an "exotic" look to them, but my experience they are not as personable as non-hybrid species.

Ocalhoun's mustangs are part of a notable exception. They're not what I'd call truly wild, but feral. Prior to their reintroduction to North America, horses underwent at least three thousand years of careful genetic selection.

Can you take a cub and socialize it to the point that it will listen to you and not kill you if you keep an eye on it? Yes, if you know what you're doing and never ever froget that the animal is not thinking like a domisticated one.
silverdown
I wouldn't recommed wild animals in domestic area because there use to hunting. They do not know how to treat people , unless you count them as FOOD!
HoboPelican
Something to keep in mind is that even the species that we consider domesticated are only domesticated in the general sense. Cats and dogs often get a bit out of hand and will attack their owners. But because of size they seldom inflict real harm (although this is not always true). I imagine horses, cattle, goats, etc get the same burr up their butts at times.

I think any species, given time, can be "domesticated" and individuals of a wild species can learn to live with man. But if you are living with a huge predator, don't be upset when he gets playful or angry and rips your arm off.
neljx
It takes many, many years to truly domesticate any animal and although finding some young wild animal at a very young age and then feeding it and caring for it and making it used to humans is in a way, "domesticating" it, it will probably never truly be "tame". Look at the "modern" dog and cat species, it has taken thousands of years to get them as domesticated as they are and I think cats are probbaly more wild at heart than we like to think! Smile
melindaregner
neljx wrote:
It takes many, many years to truly domesticate any animal and although finding some young wild animal at a very young age and then feeding it and caring for it and making it used to humans is in a way, "domesticating" it, it will probably never truly be "tame". Look at the "modern" dog and cat species, it has taken thousands of years to get them as domesticated as they are and I think cats are probbaly more wild at heart than we like to think! Smile


Agree with this one..
@bannik.. You may hope for those wild animals to be domesticated and may come true but I can say not in our generation..
Tesa323
You worded it wrong. But yea
status
all animals can be domesticated to a point, i know that wolves can be domesticated to a point. however when the wolf is fully grown and senses you, the alpha of the group is injured, he might attack...
truespeed
I remember watching a programme years ago where they bred tame foxes in Russia via selective breeding.

Wiki article.
ocalhoun
truespeed wrote:
I remember watching a programme years ago where they bred tame foxes in Russia via selective breeding.

Wiki article.



Seriously, I'm investigating getting one right now. ^.^ So awesome!
Gotta do some research on how much they cost and how tame they really are though.
*investigates*
Yay! They look very tame.
*sad* almost $7,000! ... No fox for me. Crying or Very sad Not unless I manage to get rich somehow.

Though... it does give me an idea...
I might try doing the same thing in the US... Fox ranching sounds fun, right? ^.^
And after a few generations, I might be able to start selling tame foxes domestically, and undercut their price (which is mostly due to import fees).
I'll put that down on the 'get rich schemes' list as #24.
truespeed
Wouldn't it be easier to get a bank loan,import two,one of each sex,and become a breeder in the US,if there is a market for it that is,and if there is i would be surprised if someone isn't already doing it.
ocalhoun
truespeed wrote:
Wouldn't it be easier to get a bank loan,import two,one of each sex,and become a breeder in the US,

Ah, but they spay and neuter the foxes before shipping them off, so that's not possible.

And the reason nobody's doing it yet is because there's no market for it yet... according to their website, they've only sent a grand total of 5 foxes to the US.
Part of exploiting that market would be creating it in the first place...
A few well-placed adorable pet foxes on TV would do the trick. Anybody know Oprah's number?
deanhills
Isn't it a bit cruel to domesticate foxes? I'd have thought their nature is to roam freely.
Think
truespeed
ocalhoun wrote:

Ah, but they spay and neuter the foxes before shipping them off, so that's not possible.

And the reason nobody's doing it yet is because there's no market for it yet... according to their website, they've only sent a grand total of 5 foxes to the US.
Part of exploiting that market would be creating it in the first place...
A few well-placed adorable pet foxes on TV would do the trick. Anybody know Oprah's number?


That makes sense i suppose,keep the market to themselves.

Oh and Oprah retired didn't she? Smile


ocalhoun wrote:

Isn't it a bit cruel to domesticate foxes? I'd have thought their nature is to roam freely.


Domestic Dogs were wild once,they became domesticated the same way the foxes did above,through selective breeding,though i suspect that was natural rather than purposeful selective breeding,but the end result is the same.
ocalhoun
deanhills wrote:
Isn't it a bit cruel to domesticate foxes? I'd have thought their nature is to roam freely.
Think


Perhaps, though maybe you could selectively breed for tameness without overly restricting them... and their descendants would want to be around people.


On a species-wide scale... look at horses. They would be very nearly extinct if it weren't for domestication... The particular sub-species we're most familiar with probably would be extinct if they had never been domesticated; they're no longer found wild. (Only feral)


To sum it up, I only really have a moral qualm with the very first generation who are taken out of the wild and put into captivity. The rest likely wouldn't have been born at all except in captivity, so it doesn't bother me much, as long as they are still treated well.

(And if this was back in the day when fox hunts were popular, I'd consider myself doing them a favor by saving them from the hounds.)
Insanity
Pretty sure all animals that we have domesticated have been wild to begin with...
deanhills
ocalhoun wrote:

To sum it up, I only really have a moral qualm with the very first generation who are taken out of the wild and put into captivity. The rest likely wouldn't have been born at all except in captivity, so it doesn't bother me much, as long as they are still treated well.
OK, like putting lions and tigers in a cage in a zoo. I get it. I wonder whether domesticated foxes would still go for chickens if they have been domesticated? And I wonder how they would get on with fox hounds in their domesticated capacity and the other way round? Probably stick out their tongue at the fox hounds? Twisted Evil
Ankhanu
Of course wild animals can be domesticated... all of our domesticated animals are evidence for this.
Of course, some animals are easier or more likely to be domesticated than others, but that's a different story.

deanhills wrote:
... I wonder whether domesticated foxes would still go for chickens if they have been domesticated? And I wonder how they would get on with fox hounds in their domesticated capacity and the other way round? Probably stick out their tongue at the fox hounds? Twisted Evil


Will domesticated cats or dogs go for chickens (HINT: yes they will)? Foxes would be much the same, really.
How they'd get on with fox hounds really comes down to the individual personalities involved and whether or not the hounds would treat it like a wild fox to be hunted down. There's no innate reason that a fox would have issues with a fox hound versus any other dog; it's just the use we put them to that creates the problem. It's true that foxes and dogs don't get a long terribly well, but it's not really on a scale outside of what one might expect from two species that have largely overlapping ecological niches; you see the same sort of competition and aggression between dogs, coyotes, wolves and foxes, without even including other large(ish) carnivores like cats into the picture. They rarely live harmoniously in the same areas unless they can manage to avoid one another. One species or the other will tend to exclude the others to some extent.
deanhills
Ankhanu wrote:
How they'd get on with fox hounds really comes down to the individual personalities involved and whether or not the hounds would treat it like a wild fox to be hunted down.
Right, we (I guess I should change this to I), often forget that all animals have their own personalities. Like for example Elsa the lion from Serengeti. I read that right from the beginning she had withdrawn her claws when she was playing with humans. Sort of a really special personality.
ocalhoun
Hm... for the fox breeding program, I think first I would select for tameability, and when that was suitably established, I would start selecting them for intelligence without losing the tameness. Foxes are very intelligent to begin with; it would be interesting to see how much that could be enhanced with selective breeding... and finally, when their intelligence has more or less peaked, I think I would start different strains selecting each one for a different kind of color pattern... perhaps infusing a limited amount of wild blood to introduce new color patterns, like all-white.

The wiki article spoke of 'captive, non-domesticated' foxes as if it were a common thing... Are fox farms common somewhere for some reason? If so, obtaining breeding stock and even facilities would be much easier.

Insanity wrote:
Pretty sure all animals that we have domesticated have been wild to begin with...

Perhaps mules are the exception?
Then again, donkeys and horses will occasionally interbreed in the wild, so maybe wild mules do predate domestic mules.
deanhills wrote:
ocalhoun wrote:

To sum it up, I only really have a moral qualm with the very first generation who are taken out of the wild and put into captivity. The rest likely wouldn't have been born at all except in captivity, so it doesn't bother me much, as long as they are still treated well.
OK, like putting lions and tigers in a cage in a zoo. I get it. I wonder whether domesticated foxes would still go for chickens if they have been domesticated? And I wonder how they would get on with fox hounds in their domesticated capacity and the other way round? Probably stick out their tongue at the fox hounds? Twisted Evil

From what the website said, they tend to take on the habits of whatever animals they are raised with. If they are raised with cats, they become independent and learn to use a litter box... if they are raised with dogs, they act just like dogs.

Will they try to kill chickens? Probably, but it depends on the training, just like with dogs. A poorly trained dog will kill chickens, but a well trained one will not... and can even be trained to guard them*. I imagine it is much the same with foxes... perhaps even requiring less training, since they're probably more intelligent than most dogs.

*Wouldn't it be fun to literally have a fox guarding the henhouse? ^.^
Sw4k1ll4r
Some are easier to domesticate than others... Rabbits taken from the wild and domesticated will be angrier more frightened by humans for a couple of generations...
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