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ubuntu






Is Ubuntu a good resource for developers who want to work with Linux?
Yes, definitely
52%
 52%  [ 10 ]
Yes but you need to go out of your way to use the system for development purposes
15%
 15%  [ 3 ]
No I like to work with more hardcore Linux systems such as SUSE or Redhat
31%
 31%  [ 6 ]
Total Votes : 19

peaceninja
i know there is an ubuntu forum out there on ubuntu's website, but i am curious to see if people are actually satisfied with ubuntu's usability for developers. Please do not respond to this poll if you have never used ubuntu and if you do not consider yourself a developer. Thanks,
Handyman
I think Ubuntu is strictly for beginers and intermediate users. Developers need more flexability. They usualy build there own or use something like Gentoo or Slackware. I think for the average user Ubuntu is the best choice because they have the largest community and most hardware compatibility.
Arno v. Lumig
For people who just like programming, but don't do too much complex things etc Ubuntu is just fine, because it has a lot of libraries pre-installed or easy to install with aptitude/apt-get/synaptics. Personally I really like Solaris for programming, Sun Studio just rocks (and the linux port is not that great...).
When you're programming it doesn't really matter what your platform is, as long as the libraries you use/create are portable.

Greetz,
Arno
quotebook
I love Ubuntu for all kinds of scripting (perl, python, etc) because either everything is there or it's super-easy to get it there with package installation.
Windows is a pain for stuff like Perl, because it's not built for things like scripting, whereas I feel like Linux is moreso.
Also, for C++, I'd reccommend CodeBlocks - it's a nice, powerful IDE.
The thing about Linux (and Ubuntu) is that if it's not already there, it's easily within arm's reach, which is definitely not the case with other OS's.
If I want to write a perl script, I open up my text editor, write it, save it in my home dir, and then pull up a terminal and type "perl whatever.pl" and it just works. And most libraries, if not installed, are easily accessible...I just love it.
why6487
peaceninja wrote:
i know there is an ubuntu forum out there on ubuntu's website, but i am curious to see if people are actually satisfied with ubuntu's usability for developers. Please do not respond to this poll if you have never used ubuntu and if you do not consider yourself a developer. Thanks,


I know I never used Ubuntu but consider myself as a developer for Windows and Mac OS X (which is almost like Ubuntu). I like Linux and I'll emualte it on my MacBook (which I need to burn this on a DVD or CD).
gorn
why6487 wrote:
I know I never used Ubuntu...Mac OS X (which is almost like Ubuntu).


Mac OS is NOT "almost like Ubuntu". Yeah, Ubuntu and Mac are both *nixes. But Mac is built around Darwin/BSD and Ubuntu is built around Linux/GNU. Also this poll asks specifically about Ubuntu, not about Linux, so he's talking about the stuff on top of Linux/GNU, which is even MORE different between Mac and Ubuntu.

Back on topic, I like Ubuntu a lot more than I thought I would, coming from a Slackware/Linux From Scratch/Gentoo background. Developer wise? It's annoying it doesn't come with the dev tools by default. But it's not hard to install. But then you also need to install -dev for a bunch of libraries. But Gentoo doesn't come with much at all by default, and Slackware lacks decent package management. I don't really see a big disadvantage to developing on Ubuntu than another Linux. And the advantage is that the Ubuntu platform is widely used.
eznet
Ubuntu is really about as good as any as far as development is concerned. As has been previously pointed out, its not so much platform as it is the libraries. Everything you really need to jump right in is available in Ubuntu just as it is with many other popular modern distros. The main difference with Ubuntu is its low learning curve via simplified interfaces and wide-spread hardware support.

If you are just wanting to hop in the programming and not meddle with the IT setup of the OS and development platform then Ubuntu is a great environment to hop into - and luckily if you (or an evil bug) mess up anything in the OS too bad, its an easy re-install...
desertwind
Ubuntu is a great operating system for beginners. But it's not a developers choice for sure. A developer might want an operating system which offers them more flexibility like debian/gentoo/slackware
bigdan
I wouldn't use Ubuntu for Linux programming.
MrBlueSky
bigdan wrote:
I wouldn't use Ubuntu for Linux programming.


Why?

You just install the latest bintools, C libraries, GCC, etc. and of you go. The rest doesn't really matter.
bigdan
I find it more suited to basic day to day usage and home entertainment.

But that's just me. If you can use it to program successfully, then all the best to you. Very Happy I'm sure plenty of people have in the past, and I'm sure more will continue to do so.
JayBee
desertwind wrote:
Ubuntu is a great operating system for beginners. But it's not a developers choice for sure. A developer might want an operating system which offers them more flexibility like debian/gentoo/slackware

I definitely agree with desertwind. It is not impossible but for example in gentoo is everything prepared (after your hard work and hours of compiling system Razz )
snicker
As usual when talking about GNU/Linux, I would say it is mainly a matter of taste. An expert developer may prefer a more low-level and customized environment (gentoo, debian, slackware, but also redhat), while a user/developer may appreciate the more user-friendly interface of Ubuntu, that gives a more complete user experience with less setup effort.

I personally love Slackware for development AND everyday use, but I have a very satisfying Ubuntu virtual machine for testing and playing around...

My 2 cents
yjwong
bigdan wrote:
I find it more suited to basic day to day usage and home entertainment.


I frequently use workspaces to differentiate between entertainment stuff and development stuff.

As for my own opinion, I feel that Ubuntu is quite a suitable platform for developers, especially those who are working on interpreted languages (i.e. Python, Perl and PHP). I had my development environment running within 15 minutes after I installed Ubuntu. Just a sudo apt-get install php5 apache2 mysql-server does the job for me. Smile
qscomputing
The thing with Linux is that you have choice. Linux is definitely a programmers' OS, so any Linux distro is going to be better for programming than, say, Windows. But you should be more specific when you say "development" - if you mean kernel development, then no it's probably not the best, but for simpler coding and scripts (I use mainly Perl and Tcl when I code), Ubuntu is just fine.

Personally I use Ubuntu as my only OS because I being able to get things done without the OS getting in the way - and Ubuntu seems to do this better than any other OS I have seen, including Windows, Mac and Mandriva Linux. When I say "get things done", I mean Internet, email, games, programming, etc - pretty much anything you can think of to do on a computer.
LostOverThere
In terms of advanced development I would generally go with Slackware. But as QS Computing said, Linux Distro's are all Linux so its not going to make much difference. I think *Ubuntu is just fine for any development though.
{name here}
I wouldn't go with Ubuntu for programming. Scripting, yes, but not programming. Debian, what Ubuntu forked from, would be more suited towards programming IMO for various reasons.
MrBlueSky
Yeah, I agree with qscomputing. I program a lot using various languages, both under Windows and Linux and Ubuntu works fine for me. I like it even more then the distros I always used (Suse and Redhat) because of what qscomputing very accurate called "the os not getting in the way".

Maybe you better use another distro for kernel development, I have no experience with it, but for all other programming needs Ubuntu works fine. Of course it makes a difference how you handle some things. For example: when installing a new tool you can use the distro-specific package manager. When you do this you'll run into distro specific configurations and details, and then it does matter which distro you use. But if you are used to compile and install new programs and tools from the source code, you do it your way and configure everything you want it no matter what distro it is.
LostOverThere
{name here} wrote:
I wouldn't go with Ubuntu for programming. Scripting, yes, but not programming. Debian, what Ubuntu forked from, would be more suited towards programming IMO for various reasons.


Care to explain those reasons?

Yeah, *Ubuntu (I use Kubuntu but its just KDE on Ubuntu) has everything I need. Like, for my animation and modelling wants Blender and K-3d is more then enough. Inkscape and the GIMP are great for Image Manipulation. Kino is great for Video Editting and there are literally hundreds of audio creation tools.

Why? Not because its Ubuntu - that doesn't matter. Its because its Linux. The kernal, after all - the OS doesn't really matter what matters is the heart of it. Linux.
corey
So far, I haven't found a tool that wasn't available in Ubuntu. The libraries are there, the compilers are there (you might have to install the tool chain with apt-get install build-essential), the IDE's are there. I don't know why anyone would say they aren't. One nice thing about Ubuntu, that,say Gentoo (my old distro for 2-1/2 years) and others may possibly not, is that its development will continue forward. Its Linux. If you install the toolchain, its all the same.
eznet
corey wrote:
I don't know why anyone would say they aren't.

Because opinions are like A-Holes; everyone has one and most of them stink.

There does seem to be a lot of "programming in ____ distro is a bad idea, it is better in ____ distro" going around.... to me, it sounds like "Windows/Mac is better than Mac/Windows" - Baseless, opinionated banter (except that until the intel macs - well, I won't say that they sucked... but... well, how can I be tactful about this? Ok... Macs were nice TOYS/Devices until the Intel chip).

As it has been previously said, it is large in part about preference... There is no right, there is no wrong - just opinion... The libraries are there, the tools are there.... aside from that, its a flavor opinion. Yes, some distos are 'less user friendly' and so you get the 'HARDCORE' cred when using them... On the same token, you could be viewed as hardcore by amputating a limb with a pocket knife, but I personally would rather have a bonesaw for that task.

Like others have pointed out, if you want to spend a bunch of time configuring your system so that you can begin programming for some perceived 1337 status, by all means go ahead. If you want to pop in a disk, click a few times and be able to sit down in an hour at a fresh install and start plugging code, then you might want to use something friendly like Ubuntu.
LostOverThere
eznet wrote:
Because opinions are like A-Holes; everyone has one and most of them stink.


Sig'a'Fired!
eznet
LostOverThere wrote:
eznet wrote:
Because opinions are like A-Holes; everyone has one and most of them stink.


Sig'a'Fired!


Awe, shucks -I'm blushing... Embarassed so flattering.
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