FRIHOST FORUMS SEARCH FAQ TOS BLOGS COMPETITIONS
You are invited to Log in or Register a free Frihost Account!


Dual-Boot Windows and Ubuntu





gobadger
How would I partition my Hard disk to be able to install Ubuntu and Windows and choose which system to load on boot. I have tried this before on a test PC and ubuntu just overights windows. I boot up and the option to boot windows is there but it fails to load as ubuntu erases the files. How can I install the 2 OSs side-by-side?
LukeakaDanish
Hm...it works perfectly for me...I have to separate hd's...one for win and one for linux though...maybe that helped me...

...anyway...YES you have to partition it (if you didnt than there's your reason) - and the good thing is its easy to do using the ubuntu install script..

...then afterwards when you install windows just choose a partition you left empty when you installed Ubuntu...
Cibes
I tried this just a couple of weeks ago. The Ubuntu setup has a partitioning tool, but I had some problems with the formats. So I ended up having to reinstall Windows Crying or Very sad
Gundamxxg
Google searching for dual booting windows and ubuntu gives so many details and tutorials. Google ftw?
kiranaghor
It is fairly eazy to do when it comes to installing ubuntu. In my case , installer disk used to find a non-windows partition on my disk and install ubuntu on it. But its pain the ass when windows goes bad and u want to reinstall it because it removes ur bootloader and thats either u r required to renstaller the botloader (GRUB) or reinstall ubuntu again.
Finally I switched to VMWARE. It runs on my windows xp and I can start ubuntu from within xp without reboot n without boot loader. I know its not the best way but it saved me from reinstallation and all the irritation.
tomahawk19
I'm running Vista x64 and Ubuntu on my Desktop. Simply insert the live DVD, it gives you the option to install after it boots up, you have to make sure that when you install windows you partition it so that the Windows partition is seperate from the Linux Partitions. Just leave the un-partitioned space un-allocated, so that Linux looks at is open space to install, then when you get the option in the install process in linux (after you have completely installed Windows) click on the option to install to the largest free space on the HDD. The boot loader installed fine, and all has been running well.
uros
I installed it on my computer without any hassle. It has a nice GUI that helps you partition the disk and it creates everything else for you. Here is a video on google how to create a dual boot that helped me a lot. It's easy one you do it....

http://video.google.ca/videoplay?docid=-2369893842637434537

Uros
wise
I did tried it, but i got the same problem as you had. I think you need to install ubuntu first and then install windows then it gonna work as ubuntu erases everything
utamnis
I guess my question would be: why do you want to??

I was running simplymepis and xp on two different hard drives. I never had any conflicts or issues. mepis now contains many ubuntu components and is debian based.

Anyway, after several months of dual use I got rid of xp altogether. Linux does everything I need and then some. I realize there is a lot of stuff out there that doesn't run natively in Linux but wine does a great job of bridging that gap. I have been using linux exclusively for almost a year now.

Mepis runs from a CD if you you want to give it whirl first.
djclue917
gobadger wrote:
How would I partition my Hard disk to be able to install Ubuntu and Windows and choose which system to load on boot. I have tried this before on a test PC and ubuntu just overights windows. I boot up and the option to boot windows is there but it fails to load as ubuntu erases the files. How can I install the 2 OSs side-by-side?


Ubuntu won't and can't overwrite Windows. Maybe you are referring to Ubuntu *removing* the Windows partition. In that case, don't use the auto-partition of option of the Ubuntu installer (if there's still such an option. I haven't tried using the latest, 7.04, that's why I can't confirm this.).

To dual-boot Ubuntu (and most probably any other Linux distribution out there) and Windows, you may want (and I recommend that you should) install Windows first so that you can properly setup the bootloader (in Ubuntu's case, GRUB) from Ubuntu's setup.

This is how you should generally do it:
1. If you have already installed Windows and it is using NTFS, then use a third-party (not Ubuntu's installer) partition manager to partition the disk.
2. Install Ubuntu to the EMPTY partition (the newly created partition upon partitioning the disk).
3. Add the Windows entry to the GRUB's menu list (/boot/grub/menu.lst) if it's not there yet (well, probably it's already there).

And that's all into it. I hope this helps...
djclue917
LukeakaDanish wrote:
...then afterwards when you install windows just choose a partition you left empty when you installed Ubuntu...


Just a thought... If you don't want extra work, you should install Windows first because Windows would ALWAYS overwrite the MBR upon its installation (yeah, it's selfish thinking that it is the only OS installed in your HDD). When that happens, you can no longer boot to other non-Windows OS because GRUB won't run upon system startup. In that case, you won't be able to select which OS to boot from.

When that happens, the only way to be able to use GRUB again is by using a Linux live CD (you can use Ubuntu's Live CD), then as root, using the install-grub command like so:

# install-grub /dev/sda

Where /dev/sda is your HDD device (it may also be /dev/hda, /dev/sdb, etc. depending on your device).
Jaan
You'll need Norton PartitionMagic to partition it. After that just install Ubuntu to the new partition.
billgertz
Jaan wrote:
You'll need Norton PartitionMagic to partition it. After that just install Ubuntu to the new partition.


this is correct. but first, you have to backup all your data. then make sure there's enough space for you to create a new partition using the Partition magic. What ever you do, make sure you back up all data in your PC.
Bones
Jaan wrote:

You'll need Norton PartitionMagic to partition it. After that just install Ubuntu to the new partition.

You don't need any partitioning software at all because partitioning is part of XP setup. Install XP first and create one partition that is smaller than the total size of the drive (ie if you have a 200G drive and want 100G for Windows, then create one 100G partition for Windows). Leave the rest of the drive unpartitioned. Then install Ubuntu and select the unpartitioned space to install it on. Ubuntu will then install a boot loader to the MBR and let you choose which OS you want on startup.

The only time you would need partition magic is if Windows is already installed and you need to shrink the current partition. Be careful though, I've seen partition magic trash more than one ntfs partition when resizing it.
carlospro7
This is how I did it, and I have dual boot between windows and gentoo. I also used Fedora in the past with the same hard disk set up.

One NTFS partition for the windows installation.
An external partition which included the following.
- One SWAP partition which I heard is supposed to be about twice the size of your memory, and if not, then about the size of your memory. Your linux installation will need this.
- One Ext2 or Ext3 for the actual linux operating system.
- One boot partition, which I think needs to be Ext2 or Ext3. I don't have a boot partition because I have that included with the operating system, but apparently a lot of people like to have a separate partition for the boot.

Most likely when you install Ubuntu, it will automatically set up the bootloader so that you chose between windows and linux. At least that's how it went for me when I installed Fedora. With Gentoo, that's a different story.

Oh yes, and all of the partitioning I did with PartitionMagic 8.
Ecthelion
wise wrote:
I did tried it, but i got the same problem as you had. I think you need to install ubuntu first and then install windows then it gonna work as ubuntu erases everything


This will never work, because windows erases the MBR which means you will never be able to start on ubuntu.
Because of that alwas install windows first, then ubuntu.
If you can use partition magic, make a separate partition for ubuntu. If you can't you can use the ubuntu partitioner, which works just fine these days.
Well, that is, if you can see the difference between the options:
a) erase disk and install ubuntu
b) resize windows partition & install ubuntu on free space
c) partition manually.

Indeed, if you choose ooption a, you will end up with a pc without windows. You think this is weird?
icedrakon
For the average user mandriva and debian is more stable and easy to use
I have try suse(didnt like it) fedora-rethat (not bad), debian latest distribution) and mandrake(easy install)
Related topics
What is your operating system?
Question about setting up dual boot-windows xp and mandriva
Configuring Linux / Windows Dual Boot
possible dual boot?
XP and Vista
linux sda vs hda ?
dual-boot OS with two different HDD. How can I do it?
How'to install Mac OSX 10.4.6 on a PC [Dual Boot]
Remove dual boot!!!
Dual Boot Vista and OS X
dual boot win xp 32bit with vista 64 bit
New laptop! Set up a dual boot for japes, here's how it went
Dual boot?
Installing Ubuntu for REAL REAL dummies?
Reply to topic    Frihost Forum Index -> Computers -> Operating Systems

FRIHOST HOME | FAQ | TOS | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | SITE MAP
© 2005-2011 Frihost, forums powered by phpBB.