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Your takes on COPYING DVDs & Software.





madturnip
I was wondering what some of you thought about being able to copy, backup, your media? I know it is a good idea for authors and publishers to keep their ideas their own and try to profit off of their hard work, but isn't it also fair that we have the ability to backup our property. I know I have had many times where CD's / DVD's / ETC have been scratched to the point of no use. The law gives me the right to make one backup, but if copyright software is in place to keep me from doing that ---

IS THAT FAIR?
justnewbie
Actually I'm really curious if there's anyone that will check your burned CDs and DVDs if it is illegal. I copy my CDs and DVDs whenever I feel likes it, including softwares. Nobody will nab you except if you're trying to sell them off I think.
achowles
Last I checked, you're allowed one backup copy of something you legally own. That may have been relaxed given that copying a CD to MP3 player for instance could result in a third copy depending on the methodology.

Essentially, if you have legal rights to a copy, then you're not going to get sued as it would damage them as much as you.

Don't forget that owning copies you don't have the right to own is a civil mater, not a criminal one. So it depends upon the copyright holder as to whether they sue or not as they have to fund the case.

Some indie labels say that they don't mind people copying CDs even.
standready
I see nothing wrong with making backup copies for yourself as long as you are NOT distributing to others (paid or giveaway) which is piracy.
a.Bird
You pose a very interesting question. I think the fairness of copyright software depends on whether or not the consumer is made aware of it when purchasing the disc (I assume you mean the "software" encrypted into the said DVD/CD that prohibits your burning application from duplicating the disc contents.) Technically, if you understand that the product has this limitation then it is up to you to decide whether or not to purchase it. I suppose I've never checked for this information on my DVDs but I encountered this problem before. It's certainly becoming a real drag to say the least and I'm becoming more apprehensive about purchasing new releases.
scotty
Basically what I think the lawmakers are trying to achieve with this law is to stop the distribution of copied software. It is one of those laws that will never actually be used but it makes anyone in poession of a large amount of copies against the law.

So of course selling pirated software is illegal but when somebody has 100 copies of a program they might say it's their backup which if they were crazy it might well be. Only being able to make one backup means having that many discs would be illegal and there is no need to prove that they had the intent to sell.
alexdude
You can only backup the software and movies that you own.
seanooi
yeah, we should be able to backup software and movies we own just to be on the safe side. But vendors would strongly protest against this i'm sure. Laughing
JBotAlan
I believe that if the user was not made aware of the fact that the software he/she is buying will not be copyable, that the copy protection is illegal itself. You won't get a lawyer to back you on that, though.

Simply, copy protection deprives end users of rights. The ones of us that are going to pass software on to others illegally will crack/patch/whatever the CD and software, and totally circumvent the technology that the original software company paid millions of dollars to license. And the average Joe that wants to copy his disc so when his kid scratches it all up, he doesn't have to pay another license fee (that's what you're really paying for), is screwed.
[/soapbox]

So, as far as my principles go, circumvent any copy protection that comes between you and your legal rights. I have personally removed encryption from over 100 iTunes songs that I legally bought licenses for, so I can use them in foobar2000/WinAmp/my hacked iPod/my brother's crappy Sandisk Sansa. There is such thing as fair use.

The only legal concern I have is that when I installed iTunes, I may have waived my right to circumvent this copy protection.

But I don't really care.

Wow, long post...I like to rant.
JBot
Q5U8
alexdude wrote:
You can only backup the software and movies that you own.


I think that is the point. You can backup anything you have a license. Why? If you reinstall often Windows in your PC (for stupid shareware/demoware/adware software installations), and you don't want to damage or scratch your media, in this case, WinXP, you have the right to do a backup of your WinXP CD.

But, if you do a backup of the media for a friend, familiar or any other person, you are breaking your license. Think about it. You are a software programmer, or the owner of a software company with a lot of people working hard in do a program that fit more or less your requirements (design, word processing, operative systems, design, anything else). They pay taxes, social security, permissions to stablish the business in a state or province, and other legal obligations, as rents, electricity, whatever.

They live of the licences that people buys. They pay theirs obligations, they eat from it. So, remember, when you clone a CD or DVD to give to somebody. Maybe you are hurting to families that work legal to survive....
Cibes
I think you legally have the right to make a backup - but you are not allowed to break any copy protection. So the protection basically limits your legal rights! Mad
a.Bird wrote:
I think the fairness of copyright software depends on whether or not the consumer is made aware of it when purchasing the disc
I'm pretty sure on my latest video games there is ( very small, on the back of the box ) a brief note that the software is copy protected.

I think the companies selling software/music/movies are going in the wrong direction by limiting their customers rights. There will always be some bored computer genius who will figure out a way to circumvent it. If the companies would offer their content to download for a reasonable price and without limiting the access to the stuff the user just bought with things like DRM many people would be willing to use that. I would be glad to do so - but if I can copy the song I just bought for a dollar only three times I will rather stick with web radio Wink
the1991
i think that once you buy music or software, you should be allowed to do with it whatever you please...just not distribute to other people who have not purchased what you are copying. but that's just my thoughts, obviously the rule is different.
Srs2388
I copy DVD's.. I don't sale them or anything though. I really don't see anything wrong with that.
zichlone
I belive that the copyright is put there to try and minimize the copying of said product, and i also belive that they have to make it so that you can actullay make a copy but still a very tough and long process and thereby semi securing there product
R2.DETARD
DRM is the most annoying thing ever, I hate it more than anything.
You should be able to copy the stuff you bought.
Hunterseaker
I think it's good that you're allowed to make one copy, especially from software were you paid a lot of money for... It would be a bit expensive when you scratch your Photoshop CS3 dvd's..... So yes it is good that you can make a backup....
Tho when you use that "backup" for wrong purposes, the game and software industry will get less profit and the quality of software and games will drop cause of the lack of money.

Tho the game and music industry can take advantage of the P2P networks, by using the p2p networks for promotion, they get people enthusiastic for the music and games, in that way you can make profit out something that in the 1st place reduce your profit.....
skygaia
In my country, copying DVD and CD is very serious problem. Many people download Movies and musics on the internet. So DVD market is getting dead.
dkelite
i really dont care, never readded the text called law. all the things i do is normaly free, and so what if people steals it, then will my work just get futher out.
Andrew426
I dont see a problem with copying music/movies/software for personal backup, however there is something I have always wondered.

If i download an mp3 track illegally, but a few weeks later go out and buy a cd that has that track on it (effectively buying the license) is the track I downloaded still considered an illegal copy?

What if I own a cd and want to make a backup copy of it, or put it on my mp3 player in .mp3 (or any other) format, but (for any reason at all) I am unable to/cant be stuffed ripping it, and decide that downloading that track via P2P is easier. Is this legal?
eku53ru
I think I like the idea of being able to make a copy or backup of one's media; if the original is unplayable for one reason or another (I have a bad habit of losing things in my house, so I'm normally left with the backups I made of things instead of their original counterparts), the copy normally suffices, that is, until I want to look for the lyrics to a song from a CD I lost. I am rather bothered by items that have copyright protection on them, but I can sort of see why they would have to resort to something like that. Most of the CDs I own are imported from another country, and a few of them have this wonderful little message that pops up when I try to play it in my computer. It tells me that I can only register for a license to play the CD on my computer if I was a resident of the country the CD had originally been released in, haha.
ItsWesley
I think its ok to backup or copy your own DVDs or CDs, as they are for your own use and such. I even think its alright to copy your friends DVDs, although that would be eating away slightly at the makers sales.
However Selling copied DVDs is wrong and I dont do that nor should anyone else, they are just making profit from their illegal actions, which isn't fair to anyone.
nilsmo
I do not think that the DMCA, which prevents Americans from bypassing DRM, is fair. If you buy something, I believe you should get to own it fully.
Pikokola
Hmm.. I think it's no problem, as long as you don't sell or rent, or something like giving that copy to another person who don't have legal copy for that media...
Vedder6
i dont see a problem with copying dvd's either. theres a lot of people out there that wait for their friends to buy the dvd then when theyve watched it asked to borrow it just watch/copy it. like someone said its taking a little away from the creator but the people that buy the dvd's outweigh the ones thats copy them from their pals im sure.
bigdan
I only copy DVDs to my iPod for watching on my iPod, and only make a backup of my software and iTunes tracks for my own personal use. I think most people will generally make copies for their own use, that should be fine.
KHO
Honestly, I don't see a problem with piracy. Even if I were to say, "Hey, I download things illegally online!" there would be no proof of it, so I am going to use myself as an example (though I use linux, so I really have no need for piracy =P ).

If I were to download a program, then chances are, it would be a program I would NEVER be able to afford. (Photoshop being a prime example.) By downloading this program, I don't hurt the company at all, I'm not hindering their sales because I would never have boughten the program anyway. For companies to get so wound up about this whole piracy issue is absurd. Most of these companies only make money from large companies who must obtain million dollar licenses in order to use their program across the network.

Now I understand this thread is about something other then that, but it was necessary to post that for the following to be understood properly:

There is NO reason why a company should try and restrict their product from being copied. If you are making a copy for a friend, then your serial is going to get rejected on both accounts! Way to waste alot of money buddy! But if your smart enough not to distribute, then you should be allowed to make as many copies as you would like. And even at that, the company doesn't get any downside to having to revoke a license cause its in use on like 4 machines at once.

And besides, implementing these security features are no more then a nuisance to the people who legitimately pay for the software. Anyone who is smart enough to use the interface required to download programs and upload them properly would know how to bypass that security measure and get the copy regardless.

If companies didn't want piracy to occur with their software, they would simply implement a stronger product key enforcement policy. In that a server check must occur to ensure you have the proper key (but then again, this would be just as easy to get around).
bigdan
KHO wrote:
Honestly, I don't see a problem with piracy. Even if I were to say, "Hey, I download things illegally online!" there would be no proof of it, so I am going to use myself as an example (though I use linux, so I really have no need for piracy =P ).

If I were to download a program, then chances are, it would be a program I would NEVER be able to afford. (Photoshop being a prime example.) By downloading this program, I don't hurt the company at all, I'm not hindering their sales because I would never have boughten the program anyway. For companies to get so wound up about this whole piracy issue is absurd. Most of these companies only make money from large companies who must obtain million dollar licenses in order to use their program across the network.

Now I understand this thread is about something other then that, but it was necessary to post that for the following to be understood properly:

There is NO reason why a company should try and restrict their product from being copied. If you are making a copy for a friend, then your serial is going to get rejected on both accounts! Way to waste alot of money buddy! But if your smart enough not to distribute, then you should be allowed to make as many copies as you would like. And even at that, the company doesn't get any downside to having to revoke a license cause its in use on like 4 machines at once.

And besides, implementing these security features are no more then a nuisance to the people who legitimately pay for the software. Anyone who is smart enough to use the interface required to download programs and upload them properly would know how to bypass that security measure and get the copy regardless.

If companies didn't want piracy to occur with their software, they would simply implement a stronger product key enforcement policy. In that a server check must occur to ensure you have the proper key (but then again, this would be just as easy to get around).


I find myself in that instance to look for a free-ware or open source alternative. No money changing hands in that instance either. Razz
KHO
bigdan wrote:
KHO wrote:
Honestly, I don't see a problem with piracy. Even if I were to say, "Hey, I download things illegally online!" there would be no proof of it, so I am going to use myself as an example (though I use linux, so I really have no need for piracy =P ).

If I were to download a program, then chances are, it would be a program I would NEVER be able to afford. (Photoshop being a prime example.) By downloading this program, I don't hurt the company at all, I'm not hindering their sales because I would never have boughten the program anyway. For companies to get so wound up about this whole piracy issue is absurd. Most of these companies only make money from large companies who must obtain million dollar licenses in order to use their program across the network.

Now I understand this thread is about something other then that, but it was necessary to post that for the following to be understood properly:

There is NO reason why a company should try and restrict their product from being copied. If you are making a copy for a friend, then your serial is going to get rejected on both accounts! Way to waste alot of money buddy! But if your smart enough not to distribute, then you should be allowed to make as many copies as you would like. And even at that, the company doesn't get any downside to having to revoke a license cause its in use on like 4 machines at once.

And besides, implementing these security features are no more then a nuisance to the people who legitimately pay for the software. Anyone who is smart enough to use the interface required to download programs and upload them properly would know how to bypass that security measure and get the copy regardless.

If companies didn't want piracy to occur with their software, they would simply implement a stronger product key enforcement policy. In that a server check must occur to ensure you have the proper key (but then again, this would be just as easy to get around).


I find myself in that instance to look for a free-ware or open source alternative. No money changing hands in that instance either. Razz


Which would be why Linux gets a nice +1 haha. Everything I could imagine, free of charge =]. No need for piracy, thats for the fools on windows with their viruses and lack of a stable operating system *avoids making this a OS war thread by walking out now* =| (mwahaha, the Neutral has returned in a new form! =|)
bigdan
KHO wrote:

Which would be why Linux gets a nice +1 haha. Everything I could imagine, free of charge =]. No need for piracy, thats for the fools on windows with their viruses and lack of a stable operating system *avoids making this a OS war thread by walking out now* =| (mwahaha, the Neutral has returned in a new form! =|)


True....but I use Windows and have never had a virus problem, or spyware problem, or worm problem etc...all you need is a bit of common sense and the right -free- software. Wink

And yes, I'll follow you out that door now....Wink
JJGY
I really have no problem with copying software, even in violation of the law. In this case, there is no chance of a prosecution being set on foot for something so trivial, and as long as I'm not hurting the company in any way shape or form, 'sall good Cool
Kaisonic
I'm not sure exactly what the law says, but I think that as long as you don't try to sell or give away your copies, you can copy whatever you want as much as you want. I don't care if you have 500 backups of your Adobe Premiere CD, just don't give 'em away or make them available on LimeWire. I figure that as long as you pay for something, you should be able to do with it what you wish (as long as that doesn't mean you trying to let other people NOT pay for it - the whole point is to make everyone pay for everything they use).
KHO
bigdan wrote:
KHO wrote:

Which would be why Linux gets a nice +1 haha. Everything I could imagine, free of charge =]. No need for piracy, thats for the fools on windows with their viruses and lack of a stable operating system *avoids making this a OS war thread by walking out now* =| (mwahaha, the Neutral has returned in a new form! =|)


True....but I use Windows and have never had a virus problem, or spyware problem, or worm problem etc...all you need is a bit of common sense and the right -free- software. Wink

And yes, I'll follow you out that door now....Wink

Hmmm, that's not entirely true. You HAVE in-fact had many spyware problems. I assure you. You just aren't aware of them. And depending on your client you use to download (For example, Limewire) May act as a trojan downloader. Despite your logical reasoning that a 4min song is not 700Kb, there is still the fact that you installed a P2P client on your machine. This WILL infect you. (Not saying you did). Also, though your AV may report you to be clean, there is not 1 single AV out there that can give you 100% accuracy. Spyware and virus ARE capable of hiding from them with a VERY simple injection. (I use this same injection to hack games, took me like 10min to figure out.)

Spyware also comes in the form of a tracking cookie. You use the internet often? If so, YOUR INFECTED! Congratulations =].
KHO
Kaisonic wrote:
I'm not sure exactly what the law says, but I think that as long as you don't try to sell or give away your copies, you can copy whatever you want as much as you want. I don't care if you have 500 backups of your Adobe Premiere CD, just don't give 'em away or make them available on LimeWire. I figure that as long as you pay for something, you should be able to do with it what you wish (as long as that doesn't mean you trying to let other people NOT pay for it - the whole point is to make everyone pay for everything they use).

lol, *makes copies of Adobe Premiere and shoots them to relieve the stress caused by the price*.
=] Much better =|
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