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English question





conrutr
Hello,
What do you call a person who repeats exactly the same words you speak
but in a tone and gesture to poke fun at you ? thanks
Blaster
ITs called mocking that person.

Its used like mom hes mocking me.
nilsmo
From thesaurus.com I looked up mocking to get some more synonyms:
Quote:
Main Entry: mock
Part of Speech: verb 1
Definition: ridicule
Synonyms: buffoon, burlesque, caricature, chaff, deride, flout, hoot, insult, jeer, jive, kid, kid around, laugh at, needle, parody, rally, razz, rib*, scoff, scorn, scout, show contempt, sneer, taunt, tease, travesty

Does anyone know which one of these words would fit best in this situation? Tease may be used commonly. "He's teasing me!"
Rico
comment removed - changes happen
Captain Fertile
Parody: any humorous, satirical, or burlesque imitation, as of a person, event, etc.

http://dictionary.reference.com/search?db=dictionary&q=parody

The dictionary is your friend. Wink

Try adding the other words just in case there is a better result but parody would have been my guess.
nilsmo
I don't think parody is usually used for when an annoying person copies everything you say right in front of you. More like a performance.
tbsmicro
i personally would say that they were "mimicking" me.
poiko123
I believe "mocking" more nearly connotates and imitation that is exaggerated and twisted, as this exaggerated point is the focues. "Mimicking" refers more to exactly copying an action that the person is performing.
Zruch
You can say "parrot".
justnewbie
I'm not sure what you exactly call it as. But I prefer call it as copycat. Isn't it?
Tumbleweed
justnewbie wrote:
I'm not sure what you exactly call it as. But I prefer call it as copycat. Isn't it?


Yes I would say copycat if they copied you, or at least tried to , exactly, but the poking fun and the change of voice at the same time would be more akin to sarcasm especially if your the butt of the joke
Jaan
I say "cucumber" you may say "pickles".

See what I mean?
Duncan Idaho
Well, appearantly you aren't using a dictionary/tool that has slang. It's called a copycat.
The_Gamer294
i prefer stupid but it seems everyone else is saying copycat. which was my first thought too. my second was mocking.
reddishblue
I would say Mimicking or Repeating but I don't really know Confused
scotty
Impersonator or immitator.................. ?????
Tumbleweed
Jaan wrote:
I say "cucumber" you may say "pickles".

See what I mean?


yes one is with vinegar one is not

A big burly man hits his thumb with a hammer "Oh that bleeding hurt" he says.... his work pal puts on his best girly wimpy voice on and mimicks his mates actions exagerating his movements and voice, he in essence makes a wise crack at his work mates expence,

http://www.answers.com/topic/wisecrack

conrutr wrote:
...but in a tone and gesture to poke fun at you ?..


To poke fun you need wit ...... and we all know what the lowest form of wit is .
pieman
I don't think there is a particular word for the person who does the mocking/mimicking (in my opinion both would be acceptable by the way!), but it's certainly not copycat. This would be someone who tries to copy you in a 'positive' way - e.g. wearing the same clothes, listening to the same music, etc.
Duncan Idaho
There is a particular word. It is called a copycat. To further argue, I did look the word up in the dictionary, and in the thesaurus; and while the other words may be a bit more litterate, copycat would best describe it.
mjohnson
Zruch wrote:
You can say "parrot".


I agree you. parrot is its best name Aha.
engeland
mjohnson wrote:
Zruch wrote:
You can say "parrot".


I agree you. parrot is its best name Aha.


Doesn't 'mocking' sound much better? Parrot could be confused with the noun. They both are extremely similar in meaning Confused
Crazy_Canuck
Please allow me to weigh in here! (English/linguistics major) ...

Mimicking is the act of repeating a word, act or gesture, either literally or figuratively. The person who mimics is called a "mime"--think of the actor in the black pants, suspenders and striped shirt, performing with gestures only, no words.

Because miming is typically associated with NO words, not repeating words, and because it doesn't typically carry the connotation you are looking for of "to annoy, tease, harass, disparage or make fun of", that's why the term "mock" is slightly better.

Mock always carries a connotation of teasing or humour--either playful or disparaging (satirical). But mock doesn't necessarily involve "mimicking" -- you can mock, without repeating words (either changing them to achieve humourous effect --i.e., parody--or not).

Therefore: I make a motion to create a NEW word to suit your needs: "mimocking". How's that?
hofodomo01
Exactly! When there's a problem in describing the situation, simply ignore the problem!

Completely politically correct English lol...
Crazy_Canuck
hofodomo01 wrote:
Exactly! When there's a problem in describing the situation, simply ignore the problem!
Completely politically correct English lol...


Did you mean my solution to come up with a new word??! Razz Hardly ignoring ... I thought quite creative and proactive, in fact! Smile
Tumbleweed
Crazy_Canuck wrote:
hofodomo01 wrote:
Exactly! When there's a problem in describing the situation, simply ignore the problem!
Completely politically correct English lol...


Did you mean my solution to come up with a new word??! Razz Hardly ignoring ... I thought quite creative and proactive, in fact! Smile


Yes you were being creactive
achowles
As you've probably seen from the above, there is no precise word for it, but they'd be mocking you by mimicking you. That's about as close as you're going to get.
ninjakannon
The verb is 'to mock' (the person would be 'mocking'), no question about that.

Anyone who is saying something like 'copycat', 'mimic', 'impersonate' or any word basically meaning repeat exactly has misread the question:

conrutr wrote:
What do you call a person who repeats exactly the same words you speak
but in a tone and gesture to poke fun at you ?


conrutr is referring to when someone makes fun of something someone else said by repeating it in a mocking tone.
Duncan Idaho
So it is indeed a copycat then, yes?
Crazy_Canuck
Tumbleweed wrote:
Yes you were being creactive


hehehe. That was very good. Gold star to you!

Actually, I'll do something even better. 10$fri to you for being clever, and also making me laugh. Now, go out and spread joy. Smile
ninjakannon
Duncan Idaho wrote:
So it is indeed a copycat then, yes?

Simply put: no.

Read what I said in my previous post in this thread, the one before yours.
greenwoodmonkey
It seems that everyone is dancing around the same answers on this namely :
Copycat and Mocking

It maybe better to put these into a sentence in order to convey the true useage...

"Mom, He is mocking me"
"Mom, he is mimicking me"
"Mom, he is being a copycat"

"Mom, I think I killed him"

There we go..
tbsmicro
Crazy_Canuck wrote:
Please allow me to weigh in here! (English/linguistics major) ...

Mimicking is the act of repeating a word, act or gesture, either literally or figuratively. The person who mimics is called a "mime"--think of the actor in the black pants, suspenders and striped shirt, performing with gestures only, no words.

Because miming is typically associated with NO words, not repeating words, and because it doesn't typically carry the connotation you are looking for of "to annoy, tease, harass, disparage or make fun of", that's why the term "mock" is slightly better.

Mock always carries a connotation of teasing or humour--either playful or disparaging (satirical). But mock doesn't necessarily involve "mimicking" -- you can mock, without repeating words (either changing them to achieve humourous effect --i.e., parody--or not).

Therefore: I make a motion to create a NEW word to suit your needs: "mimocking". How's that?


I am in awe of your boundless knowledge... I like the cut of your jib Crazy _Canuck... and i'm not mimocking you in any way. !! : )
ninjakannon
tbsmicro wrote:
Crazy_Canuck wrote:
Please allow me to weigh in here! (English/linguistics major) ...

Mimicking is the act of repeating a word, act or gesture, either literally or figuratively. The person who mimics is called a "mime"--think of the actor in the black pants, suspenders and striped shirt, performing with gestures only, no words.

Because miming is typically associated with NO words, not repeating words, and because it doesn't typically carry the connotation you are looking for of "to annoy, tease, harass, disparage or make fun of", that's why the term "mock" is slightly better.

Mock always carries a connotation of teasing or humour--either playful or disparaging (satirical). But mock doesn't necessarily involve "mimicking" -- you can mock, without repeating words (either changing them to achieve humourous effect --i.e., parody--or not).

Therefore: I make a motion to create a NEW word to suit your needs: "mimocking". How's that?


I am in awe of your boundless knowledge... I like the cut of your jib Crazy _Canuck... and i'm not mimocking you in any way. !! : )

I don't see why... tbsmicro didn't even get it completely right.

To mock (in this circumstance): To poke fun at, ridicule or in some way satirise. Mocking does not "carry a connotation of teasing or humour", it means to tease or humour.

A connotation is something associated with a word, phrase, action or perhaps in some cases also with an object that is not explicitly stated or necessarily even implied.

To mimic: To copy closely or exactly speech or actions.

One point I must make is that you can mimic to mock. An example of this is when someone repeats exactly a word, phrase or sentence in the same tone (thus mocking the way they said it). Or when someone repeats exactly the same word, phrase or sentence to emphasise a silly mistake that the person made.
Either way, the person is not changing the tone of voice in which they repeat the words, therefore they are in this case mocking by mimicry. However, conrutrs question regarded changing the tone of voice - this is mocking as it is not a copy of what the person originally said, it is an alteration on it.

I hope I've made this clear, there is a difference (however subtle you believe it to be) between mocking and mimicking in this circumstance and I have attempted to make it clear.
Crazy_Canuck
ninjakannon wrote:
tbsmicro wrote:
Crazy_Canuck wrote:
Please allow me to weigh in here! (English/linguistics major) ...

etc., etc., blah blah blah (editing my own post -CC)

Therefore: I make a motion to create a NEW word to suit your needs: "mimocking". How's that?


I am in awe of your boundless knowledge... I like the cut of your jib Crazy _Canuck... and i'm not mimocking you in any way. !! : )

I don't see why... tbsmicro didn't even get it completely right.


Methinks you meant to disparage my knowledge, and not tbsmicro's (whose own, I'm sure, is equally boundless).

ninjakannon wrote:
To mock (in this circumstance): To poke fun at, ridicule or in some way satirise. Mocking does not "carry a connotation of teasing or humour", it means to tease or humour.


I'll help you out by adding emphasis via boldface. I agree with the distinction you are drawing between mock's literal meaning and its connotations, but not entirely with your definition of "to mock." Mocking can also be defined as indicating derision or contempt for something. When used with that literal meaning intended, mock may not adequately connote the idea of playful teasing desired by the OP.

ninjakannon wrote:
One point I must make is that you can mimic to mock.


Yes, a point I also made. But, you don't have to. You can mimic and not mock; and you can mock without mimicking. That said, mockery by mimickry certainly is annoying and according to greenwoodmonkey, quite possibly lethal. I prefer death by chocolate.

ninjakannon wrote:
I hope I've made this clear, there is a difference (however subtle you believe it to be) between mocking and mimicking in this circumstance and I have attempted to make it clear.


Yes, I agree there is a difference; what I don't agree with is that the verb "to mock" is the appropriate one. Which does not imply that the verb "to mimic" IS the right one. It's mimocking, I tell ya'.

But the real point is: while you've made it clear, you haven't made it much fun now, have you? And what good is wordplay if it's not fun??!?

tbsmicro wrote:
I am in awe of your boundless knowledge... I like the cut of your jib Crazy _Canuck... and i'm not mimocking you in any way. !! : )


And as for you young man or woman, I'm pretty sure you're sucking up to me. No matter, I am easily sucked up to. I love well-executed obsequiousness. Obsequiosity. Obsequiotization. Well, you know what I mean. Or perhaps you don't, which might be the matter for another thread. Go ahead and start it, ninjakannon and I will join right in.

$10Frih to you as well. My knowledge is as boundless as my generosity, apparently.
ninjakannon
Crazy_Canuck wrote:
Methinks you meant to disparage my knowledge, and not tbsmicro's (whose own, I'm sure, is equally boundless).

Oh dear... I feel a bit foolish now, yeah you're right. I went to copy and paste your username so that I wouldn't type it incorrectly and bumblingly managed to copy tbsmicro's instead. Then I assumed that I was addressing him throughout. Confused

Crazy_Canuck wrote:
I agree with the distinction you are drawing between mock's literal meaning and its connotations, but not entirely with your definition of "to mock." Mocking can also be defined as indicating derision or contempt for something. When used with that literal meaning intended, mock may not adequately connote the idea of playful teasing desired by the OP.

Yes, I see your point; mocking can carry a slightly harsher connotation than mimicking, in which case I agree that 'mock' may not be the right word to use in all cases when talking about playful teasing. Mimicking definitely carries a lighter feel with it, in fact I don't think mimicking someone can do too much harm. Mocking, on the other hand, can, it's more a form of attacking someone (however light-heartedly).

Crazy_Canuck wrote:
... I prefer death by chocolate.

Me too! Or... there's always death by Snoo Snoo, Futurama fans will know what I mean (well, I would hope so anyway; if not check out season 3, episode 5 (it's called "Amazon Women In The Mood")).

Anyway, getting back on track:
Crazy_Canuck wrote:
Yes, I agree there is a difference; what I don't agree with is that the verb "to mock" is the appropriate one. Which does not imply that the verb "to mimic" IS the right one. It's mimocking, I tell ya'.

I've come around to your idea of 'mimocking' now, you should push for it to be added to the dictionary. Perhaps create a Wikipedia page all about it. Razz

Crazy_Canuck wrote:
But the real point is: while you've made it clear, you haven't made it much fun now, have you? And what good is wordplay if it's not fun??!?

Oww, I ruined the fun. I didn't mean to, honest! Next time [perhaps] I'll try to add a joke or two and make up some new words as well. Razz

Hang on a minute... I have made up a new word! Although it should really be one already to be honest. I said way back in paragraph 1: "bumblingly", which isn't in my dictionary so I guess I've made the adverb for 'bumbling' now, I'm surprised it wasn't already in my dictionary. Oh, and say "bumblingly" out loud, I just love the way it sounds. Razz
Crazy_Canuck
ninjakannon wrote:
I've come around to your idea of 'mimocking' now, you should push for it to be added to the dictionary. Perhaps create a Wikipedia page all about it. Razz


Great idea! Oh, wait ... I'm far too lazy for that. hehehe

ninjakannon wrote:
Oww, I ruined the fun. I didn't mean to, honest! Next time [perhaps] I'll try to add a joke or two and make up some new words as well. Razz

Hang on a minute... I have made up a new word! Although it should really be one already to be honest. I said way back in paragraph 1: "bumblingly", which isn't in my dictionary so I guess I've made the adverb for 'bumbling' now, I'm surprised it wasn't already in my dictionary. Oh, and say "bumblingly" out loud, I just love the way it sounds. Razz


That's the spirit! I LOVE bumblingly. $10frih for you (like you need them!) for that.

Now, can you create an adjective form of integrity? Coz I have been searching my whole life for that, and I'm convinced there isn't one, but should be.

Ooops thread hijack. Wink

do you think the OP even CARES about this topic anymore??!?
{name here}
Crazy_Canuck wrote:
ninjakannon wrote:
I've come around to your idea of 'mimocking' now, you should push for it to be added to the dictionary. Perhaps create a Wikipedia page all about it. Razz


Great idea! Oh, wait ... I'm far too lazy for that. hehehe

Try wiktionary.
ninjakannon
{name here} wrote:
Crazy_Canuck wrote:
ninjakannon wrote:
I've come around to your idea of 'mimocking' now, you should push for it to be added to the dictionary. Perhaps create a Wikipedia page all about it. Razz


Great idea! Oh, wait ... I'm far too lazy for that. hehehe

Try wiktionary.

Well I didn't add 'mimocking' to there, but I've added 'bumblingly'. The main reason for that is because 'mimocking' is a whole new word whereas 'bumblingly' is just another word but in adverb form.

Crazy_Canuck wrote:
do you think the OP even CARES about this topic anymore??!?

Nope, I bet they've forgotton all about it all together! FriHost won't be the thing at the front of his/her mind I can tell you.
Vrythramax
Mocking is a good word, but I believe the one word that has been overlooked is "sarcasim" or being sarcastic.

Being, or acting like, an A**hole is another way to phrase it. Smile
cybernie
i'd rather call that person "crazy for me" hehehe
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