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Holograms (Transmission and Reflection)





Donutey
I'm just curious if any one has worked with holography as part of a physics course.

We've just finished up a holography unit in physics, where we burned through $300 of glass holography plates for reflection holograms, and I'm interesting if anyone has made transmission holograms and what experiences they might have to share, as the teacher has set up time for us to do them on our own outside of class.
coolclay
I never have. What do holograms have to do with physics anyway?
Shake
I haven't done any of that, but it sounds interesting. I will look forward to it in the near future, as I am taking a physics class.
Ennex
coolclay wrote:
I never have. What do holograms have to do with physics anyway?


From what i know its just using physics to apply the use oh photons and light to create any image you need, thats basically a hologram, the problem is creating an interactive program e.g Star Trek Voyagers EMH, to use it or get it functioning properly.
EanofAthenasPrime
Donutey wrote:
I'm just curious if any one has worked with holography as part of a physics course.

We've just finished up a holography unit in physics, where we burned through $300 of glass holography plates for reflection holograms, and I'm interesting if anyone has made transmission holograms and what experiences they might have to share, as the teacher has set up time for us to do them on our own outside of class.


I think that the tough part is making a hologram that uses only a single projector. These are some methods I have just though of to make that possible:
-Have a particle (dust like cloud) in the areas you want to see, but this method would be too random
-Have tiny micro-pixel-ray emmiters, which fire a beam of laser upward. To eliminate the infinite* beam of laser, dynamically-rotatable-micro-pixel-ray-disruptors are placed next to the emmiters at a variable angle, to disrupt (stop the beam of light) from continuing further. With thousands of emmiters and disruptors, images with computer screen precision could be acheived with only one vertical projector, no dust, in almost any amount (or lack of) lighting, and with no traditional projection screen
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