FRIHOST FORUMS SEARCH FAQ TOS BLOGS COMPETITIONS
You are invited to Log in or Register a free Frihost Account!


Linux





KHO
Ok, so I downloaded a program I need (Samba), I installed Debian onto a computer, but im completely new to linux. How can I get the downloaded file into a package so I can install it (It was a .tar.gz file, inside of the archive was a debian-unstable dir which is what im using)
qscomputing
You can probably get a precompiled version for your system using apt
Unfortunately I don't use debian so I don't know the ins and outs of apt, but if you have a package manager called Synaptic you'll probably find it in there.
Then it will download and install everything automatically for you. HTH.
{name here}
KHO wrote:
Ok, so I downloaded a program I need (Samba), I installed Debian onto a computer, but im completely new to linux. How can I get the downloaded file into a package so I can install it (It was a .tar.gz file, inside of the archive was a debian-unstable dir which is what im using)

Code:

apt_get samba


If you have a GUI installed you can use Aperture(In GNOME it was called Package Manager IIRC), which is a GUI frontend to the package manager you can use to install things. I haven't use Debian in a year or two, though.
ayvee
still, if you want to install from your downloaded package, do the following.

navigate to the folder containing your downloaded file. double click on it to open it in the archive manager. click extract all files. now open the newly created directory. open the README or INSTALL files. any further instructions will be present there.

usually you'll have to open a commandline, navigate to this directory, and then execute make or install.sh or something like that. the readme file should give you all the details.
redice
Use apt-get to install samba instead of build from source:

Code:
apt-get install samba


Edit the config file /etc/samba/smb.conf , and restart it:

Code:
/etc/init.d/samba restart


All will work well.
KHO
Ok, thank you all, only one more question. So if there are pre-compiled releases, which one would I use? Like I know theres the .rpm files which are redhat I think, but which extension would I look for?

And after downloading that, what do I do with it? Just open it up in the GUI end of aptitude and search for the package?
{name here}
KHO wrote:
Ok, thank you all, only one more question. So if there are pre-compiled releases, which one would I use? Like I know theres the .rpm files which are redhat I think, but which extension would I look for?

And after downloading that, what do I do with it? Just open it up in the GUI end of aptitude and search for the package?

Linspire's packaging system and Red Hat's Packaging system are the only two that provide a setup-like binary install. Debian packages will too if you use apt-get or use Aptitude to search for a package, and then install it directly. All you have to do in Aptitude is check the package you want from the Debian FTP site and click install. It will automatically install it and if you want to uninstall it just uncheck it.
KHO
{name here} wrote:
KHO wrote:
Ok, thank you all, only one more question. So if there are pre-compiled releases, which one would I use? Like I know theres the .rpm files which are redhat I think, but which extension would I look for?

And after downloading that, what do I do with it? Just open it up in the GUI end of aptitude and search for the package?

Linspire's packaging system and Red Hat's Packaging system are the only two that provide a setup-like binary install. Debian packages will too if you use apt-get or use Aptitude to search for a package, and then install it directly. All you have to do in Aptitude is check the package you want from the Debian FTP site and click install. It will automatically install it and if you want to uninstall it just uncheck it.


Also, for debian there are .deb files that can be right clicked and installed. Webmin was not in aptitude or apt-get so I went to the website and looked around on the downloads section and there was a .deb file that was for debian and debian based systems.

Now If I can only figure out how to get it to act as the domain and let the internet flow through it instead of a router =\
qscomputing
In Linux we don't download programs and install them like in Windows. We find the name of the program we are looking for and then instruct our package manager to go and find it for us. This is more convenient, especially as in Linux it's customary to rely on other libraries which are not generally packaged with the program itself. The package manager will sort this all out automatically. HTH.
Related topics
Novell acquires Linux security company
IBM, Red Hat widen Linux mainframe promotion
own linux distro
Nokia does Linux on its new Internet tablet
Linux or Windows on your computer?!
Linux and other IT books
A "small" list of free apps
BIG LINUX
Linux & Windows
Tutorials-How To Install Winxp And Linux To The Same Compute
Linux Problem
Thumb-drive Linux Distro
Linux Needs Progs
Windows to Linux ( Vice Versa )
A nice Linux kernal tutorial!
Reply to topic    Frihost Forum Index -> Computers -> Operating Systems

FRIHOST HOME | FAQ | TOS | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | SITE MAP
© 2005-2011 Frihost, forums powered by phpBB.