FRIHOST FORUMS SEARCH FAQ TOS BLOGS COMPETITIONS
You are invited to Log in or Register a free Frihost Account!


American Dollar Coin






Are you for the dollar coin in the U.S.A.?
$1 Coin Only (Yes)
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
$1 Coin & $1 Bill Together
50%
 50%  [ 2 ]
$1 Bill Only (No)
50%
 50%  [ 2 ]
Total Votes : 4

Soulfire
According to an article at Yahoo!, the dollar coin goes into general circulation on Thursday. Also there was congressional debate about eliminating the penny, because the copper-coated penny costs more to create than it is worth.

Quote:
Maybe Susan B. Anthony and Sacagawea should not take public rejection personally. It's not easy overcoming people's indifference to dollar coins, even those honoring such historic figures.

An AP-Ipsos poll found that three-fourths of people surveyed oppose replacing the dollar bill, featuring George Washington, with a dollar coin. People are split evenly on the idea of having both a dollar bill and a dollar coin.

A new version of the coin, paying tribute to American presidents, goes into general circulation Thursday. Even though doing away with the bill could save hundreds of millions of dollars each year in printing costs, there is no plan to scrap the bill in favor of the more durable coin.

"I really don't see any use for it," Larry Ashbaugh, a retiree from Bristolville, Ohio, said of the dollar coin. "We tried it before. It didn't fly."

Two recent efforts to promote wide usage of a dollar coin proved unsuccessful. A quarter-century ago, it showed feminist Susan B. Anthony on the front; then one in 2000 featuring Sacagawea, the Shoshone Indian who helped guide the Lewis and Clark expedition.

The latest dollar coin will bear Washington's image, followed later this year by those of John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison. A different president will appear on the golden dollar coins every three months.

The series of coins will depict four different presidents per year, in the order they served.

Congress voted to create the new dollar coin, betting that this series would be more popular than its recent predecessors.

The Susan B. Anthony dollar put the image of the women's rights activist on a small silver coin that looked a lot like a quarter. The U.S Mint was left with millions of unused coins.

As for the Sacagawea dollar, gold in color, millions of the coins also piled up in bank vaults for the same reason: lack of demand.

People say they just prefer the traditional greenback.

"The dollar bill is lighter, takes up less space in a clutch or a man's wallet and paper money counts easier and stacks up easier than metallic coins," said Nena Wise of York, Pa.

People have strong feelings about their money, even the penny.

A congressional effort to reduce the need for the cent piece failed even though it costs more to produce the copper-colored coin than the coin is worth.

When people were asked whether the penny should be eliminated, 71 percent said no, according to the poll of 1,000 adults conducted Nov, 28-30. Some fear that getting rid of the penny will cause product prices to be rounded up, perhaps increasing inflation.

In other poll findings:

_53 percent said they carry their loose change collected during the day to use for future purchases.

_42 percent put their loose change in a jar or piggy bank each day.

_48 percent said they use cash for purchases under $10.

_28 percent said they usually use cash in such cases, but sometimes use credit or debit cards, according to the poll with a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 3 percentage points.

Rather than a high-profile ad campaign like the one used to introduce the Sacagawea dollar, the Mint is trying a more grass-roots approach. The agency is talking to the Federal Reserve, banks and vending machine operators to stir up interest in the new dollar coin.

Supporters of the new presidential dollar coin point to the success of the 50-state quarter program. Begun in 1999, this program has introduced millions of people to coin collecting for the first time.

For Richard Wander of Albany, N.Y, the dollar coin is a welcome addition because he is "kind of a collector."

"I think it's good to have both," he said. "Instead of taking time to put four quarters in a parking meter, you could put in a dollar.

"But I think dollar bills are part of the economic system," he said, "and they work fine."

The presidential coins will be the 14th dollar coin series produced by the Mint going back to 1794. The Susan B. Anthony replaced the Eisenhower dollar in 1979.

Before the Eisenhower dollar's introduction in 1971, there was a gap of 36 years when the Mint did not produce a dollar coin after the last Peace dollar was minted in 1935.

The public can start getting the Washington dollars on Thursday from commercial banks that have placed orders with the Federal Reserve, which handles coin distribution for the Mint.

U.S. Mint Director Edmund C. Moy said he was encouraged by the initial demand for the new coin. The Fed has ordered 300 million Washington dollars so far.


Here are the pros and cons of the dollar coin (as far as I can tell):

PROS:
Save the U.S.A. hundreds of millions of dollars (cut the cost of making the dollar bill)
Much more durable and long-lasting than dollar bill
Presidents (4 new per year) depicted on the coin, in the order that they served.

CONS:
Harder to carry than the dollar bill
Doesn't stack like paper does
Confused with other coins
Harder to count than paper money

Two attempts at a dollar coin by congress have failed.

What do you think?
{name here}
It's not going to fly with the American people. The dollar bill is still going to reign supreme because it isn't cumbersome, and that's what matters to the people that still use money and don't blow everything on a credit card.
smarter
This attempt will fail as the previous ones did. Most people prefer paper (or plastic). I think this was the principal cause of failure.

On the other hand the figures used on previous attempts are laughable. Laughing Money is a symbol of power. Put some strong figures there: Rockefeller, Greenspan etc not some country women with no connection to economy.

Other countries put on their banknotes poets, painters, etc Laughing Laughing Laughing or historical figures (such as revolutionaries, many of them anti-capitalists, how ironic!)

They don't get it! ... or probably just one more medium for propaganda!
HoboPelican
smarter wrote:
...
On the other hand the figures used on previous attempts are laughable. Laughing Money is a symbol of power. Put some strong figures there: Rockefeller, Greenspan etc not some country women with no connection to economy.

Other countries put on their banknotes poets, painters, etc Laughing Laughing Laughing or historical figures (such as revolutionaries, many of them anti-capitalists, how ironic!)...


Rockefeller? Rolling Eyes Sheesh, next you'll want Bill Gates on a coin. Yeah, let's celebrate the robber barons.

I like the idea of a dollar coin, but why are they so focused on a size so close to the quarter? That is just asking for confusion and confusion is going to slow down it's acceptance. Make it closer to the size of the old 1/2 dollar and I bet it will find wider acceptance.
smarter
HoboPelican wrote:

Rockefeller? Rolling Eyes Sheesh, next you'll want Bill Gates on a coin. Yeah, let's celebrate the robber barons.


Many probably don't know that Rockefeller had a long career in philanthropy. Eradication of hookworm and yellow fever maybe rings a bell. Rolling Eyes Sheesh! these pelicans! Laughing

... and after donating $25 billlion maybe Gates deserves to have his face on a coin. Why not? Laughing Cool Laughing

P.S. I'm not a fan of Gates or Microsoft! Au contraire!
HoboPelican
smarter wrote:
...Many probably don't know that Rockefeller had a long career in philanthropy.


I never understand people defending the likes of Gates or Rockefeller based on their "philanthropy". They have more money than they can use in a life time and the fact that they give some to charity (getting a nice tax break in the process) makes it all ok. Whatever.

But whatever icon they chose, I think it is the size that is going to kill it. People will sort their change in the morning, look at the quarters and dollars and just toss the dollar coin into the change jar to avoid confusion.
ocalhoun
We already have a dollar coin...

Personally, I hate 'em.
Soulfire
Yeah, these are the latest attempt. I think it could be okay, but we're just too used to dollar bills.
{name here}
Soulfire wrote:
Yeah, these are the latest attempt. I think it could be okay, but we're just too used to dollar bills.

Dollar bills? Pfft. You're living in the past! Getting yourself in debt up to your eyeballs is where it's at! Laughing
DILLIGAF
My question is how would you use them at a strip bar. Twisted Evil
Related topics
If you had 1,000,000 What would you so with it?
Why is Bush pressuring China to raise its currency?
What's great about your country?
WW II
Some Coins Lack 'In God We Trust'
Canadian$ Reaching Parity With US$
India's booming economy
Bush Economic Stimulus Package
Can/Should the U.S.A. join the European Union?
My favorit hobby is tracking Money
CERN's LHC
OBAMA THREAD :D
Numismatics
ever thought about travelling to nepal?
Reply to topic    Frihost Forum Index -> Lifestyle and News -> Discuss World News

FRIHOST HOME | FAQ | TOS | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | SITE MAP
© 2005-2011 Frihost, forums powered by phpBB.