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Difference between asian and hollywood movies





the9squad
haha, when i watch some horror movie, i found the difference between hollywood-style and asian-style horror film.

in asian style,
it's containing a white-scary-ghost called 'kuntilanak' or something.
the ghost always shows up SUDDENLY.
and it's only appear in a short duration.
the ending is 'odd' for me.

in hollywood style,
maybe it's only about murderer, psychophat with uncanny behaviour.
many violence with blood.
and the main difference is, in hollywood style there's a kissing and want-to-do-sex scene Very Happy Very Happy (between actor and acrees) Wink
mattchun
Yes! You got the point.

I agree with you, the most different thing between these two kinds of horror movies is BLOOD.

You can see a lot of blood in Hollywood, but not in eastern movies.
azfad
on a slightly different note regarding asian action movies, as opposed to horror movies, vs. anywhere else on the planet - the fight scenes are WAY more intense and bone crunchingly painful.

the one-take fight sequence in OLDBOY in particular is just something else (and the guy eating the live squid is just... really disturbing)

when it comes to full-on fisticuffs no-one beats the asians for me.
RallyMonkey
The most famous of American Action movies are almost all inspired by Asian cinema. Same with the horror genre.
jasmine
I prefer Asian movies since they are more 'emotionally' attaching themselves to the audience even when they do not use much effects.

I don't know, Asian movies can do a lot with simple but effective techniques.
Scaramanga
the9squad wrote:
and the main difference is, in hollywood style there's a kissing and want-to-do-sex scene Very Happy Very Happy (between actor and acrees) Wink

Actually a lot of this has to do with traditional mores in the West. Watch almost any traditional American horror film, and look for the people that are sexual active or promiscuous; they are usually the first to be killed. In fact this same trope holds true for OTHER vices, such as drugs or booze. Asian horror films (although I think using the term Asian is a gross generalization, as there are marked differences between say Chinese, Korean and Japanese horror films) while different, have their own set of "rules".
RT Cunningham
I have to attest to the fact that I enjoyed a Korean college comedy more so than the American counterpart. "Sex Is Zero" is hilarious.
Tokci
Asian horror movies are the best...they bank on the fact that ppl fear the unknown...ie what they can't see. Also they are more realastic.

and for real intense fight sequences asian movies are way ahead...as someone gave the example of oldboy.

Hollywood movies are about bid stunts and big special effects but for mre realistic approach I think asian movies are better.
HereticMonkey
RallyMonkey wrote:
The most famous of American Action movies are almost all inspired by Asian cinema. Same with the horror genre.


Actually, it's a weird cross-pollenization. Consider "Last Man Standing" (Bruce Willis). It's based off "Yojimbo", but that's in turn based off such westerns as "High Noon". A lot of Japanese cyberpunk is based off Blade Runner and Terminator, but Blade Runner has a lot of Japanese origins.

The point about "Asian" being a bad grouping is pretty good; Japanese movies tend to be more influenced by Western mores than Chinese movies, which tend to be based off more traditional theater, than Indian movies, which are something altogether different.

I'd really debate horror, however. Only The Ring and The Grudge (and their sequels) are Japanese; the rest owes a lot to the older slasher movies. Admittedly most of the genre (like any other) is stuff that should be forgotten, there's a lot of fun stuff there. Also, Japanese and Chinese horror movies are incredibly gory; how do you figure that they aren't?

HM
Scaramanga
HereticMonkey wrote:
Actually, it's a weird cross-pollenization. Consider "Last Man Standing" (Bruce Willis). It's based off "Yojimbo", but that's in turn based off such westerns as "High Noon".

Actually I agree that there's a weird cultural crossing going on (more below) but let me set the record straight on a few things. While Kurosawa was inspired by John Ford films, Yojimbo isn't based off of them. In fact it's based off of the much earlier film noir The Glass Key, from which almost entire scenes are lifted. Also interesting to note that The Glass Key was in turn based on a Dashiell Hammett novel from 1931, and that the plot of another Hammett Novel - Red Harvest, 1932 - bears a stronger resemblance to the plot of Yojimbo, than even The Glass Key. And that Yojimbo in turn inspired the Leone/Eastwood film A Fistful of Dollars.

Hell, Kurosawa alone has been imitated and emulated so many times, it's probably hard to count them all. Take the Seven Samurai, which was remade and reporposed a good number of times. Ever seen The Magnificent Seven, Battle Beyond the Stars, or hell, Disney/Pixar's A Bug's Life? Yup, all are direct adaptations of Seven Samurai.

Another weird cultural phenomena is that Japan's current anime owes a lot of its origins to old style Western animation. And yet, here in the US at least, things have come full-circle, with many pop-media artforms adopting a style that is distinctly cribbed from Japanese anime and manga.
Tokci
indian movies are something very different to korean, jap, chinese or hollywood movie.

we do not have BIG action movies here....more of romantic/comedy movies with lots of songs and dancing.

it different but being an indian...i just love them.
RT Cunningham
What was the topic again? Oh yeah.

You know, Filipinos are like that too. Most of their movies are drama/romance. They have very, very little of anything else. People here who want to see action or sci-fi go the stores and buy American movies.
loryl
The main difference between Asian and Hollywood movies is that in Asian movies, the star is the Asian; in Hollywood movies, the star is usually Caucasian with the Asian as the comic relief or in a minor side role.
RT Cunningham
Oh, I don't know. Big Trouble in Little China was U.S. made and Kurt Russell was the sidekick.
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