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Linspire CNR technology





esioquim
Linspire is creating a website for their CNR technology which would later on cater to different linux distributions. What do you think is the impact of this initiative to other linux distros? How about on windows?
qscomputing
I'm not entirely sure what advantages CNR has over apt or urpm...
WickedGravity
There are no advantages, especially over APT. How can one possibly compare to the simplicity, ease of use, and bug free environment of it?

In a word or two, they can't.
djclue917
qscomputing wrote:
I'm not entirely sure what advantages CNR has over apt or urpm...


Simply put, with CNR, the user would have a very pleasing interface to view information, reviews, screenshots, and probably many more about a particular software package. Of course, you can also install software via CNR. But in a Debian system, for example, CNR would act something like a web-based front-end for APT/DPKG, Think of it as a web-based synaptic that is more wicked, featureful, and user-friendly.

On of the problems that would hopefully be solved by the new "CNR for all" is the "complexity" of installing packages in different distros. Sure you can easily install something via APT when you're already familiar with Debian and its derivatives, but what happens when you migrate to an RPM-based distro or even a tar.gz-based distro (like Slack and Arch) and you know nothing about that particular package management system?

A Linux newbie wouldn't have to be familiar with the different package management software to be able to use CNR. In effect, CNR acts like an abstraction layer between the user and the package management system of a specific distro. That is, the method in installing packages via CNR in Debian would also be the same method used in installing packages via CNR in openSUSE, Fedora, Ubuntu, or Freespire.

"But what if my distro isn't supported? What would be CNR's use for me?" Simple answer: CNR contains a lot of valuable information about software packages.
djclue917
I forgot... For a Linux.com article, please visit this URI: http://enterprise.linux.com/article.pl?sid=07/01/23/2113216

It's a nice read.
djclue917
WickedGravity wrote:
There are no advantages, especially over APT. How can one possibly compare to the simplicity, ease of use, and bug free environment of it?

In a word or two, they can't.


Obvious advantages of CNR over APT:
1. You can view screenshots of a particular software package.
2. You can write and/or read reviews about a particular software package.
3. You can rate a package so that the better ones would be quickly found by others.
4. CNR can present information in a better way because of its web-based nature (think of all those images, buttons, CSS, etc.).
5. "Click 'N Run"-type of installation (great for users who just switched to Linux)

BTW, CNR is not something "in its own world". It will use the standard tools used for package management in a specific distro. With that said, CNR would most likely use APT or DPKG for package handling. Also, stability won't be an issue since using CNR is just like using a GUI front-end like Synaptic and the like.
qscomputing
OK, sounds like a potential good thing, provided the main repos are Free (libre and gratis) and/or there is a prominent option to view Free only.
surdy
thanks djclue917 for the info Smile

CNR looks intersting from what it is claiming. Hope it actually delivers on this ..thats would be really great
Studio Madcrow
CNR was one of the big advantages of Linspire. While I personally don't much care for network-based package systems, CNR seems to be just about the best and easiest to use one around.

In the end, though, systems like M$'s .msi, NEXT/OPENSTEP's .pkg/.app, PC-BSD's .pbi and Apple's .dmg/.app systems are much better and eaier to use, at least for me.
djclue917
Studio Madcrow wrote:
In the end, though, systems like M$'s .msi, NEXT/OPENSTEP's .pkg/.app, PC-BSD's .pbi and Apple's .dmg/.app systems are much better and eaier to use, at least for me.


Yes you are right. When you get accustomed to using a particular package management system, you would most likely not need CNR. But CNR offers more than easy installation of packages. It also provides invaluable information in a very pleasing manner. Compare that to simply reading a package's description from Synaptic or from whatever package manager you use. The information in CNR for each package is undoubtedly better in terms of content and in terms of the presentation of the information itself.

I'm actually planning on using CNR for "hunting" more killer apps that need more publicity.
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