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Running Windows applications on MACs






If you could make a choice (based on the experience that you've had and considering the availability of quality third party software) which type of machine would you pick?
Mac
75%
 75%  [ 12 ]
Windows
18%
 18%  [ 3 ]
I rate them both as equall
6%
 6%  [ 1 ]
Total Votes : 16

defnet
I have read on the Apple website that Mac is able to run Windows and Windows-application.

I was thinking about switchin to Mac for my personal use (do alot of soundstuff and recording), but the questions that remains are:
1. Can Mac run the Windows OS just like it was a normal PC?
2. Can I plug in a device install the Windows drivers and just work with it on a Mac computer.
3. Can Mac play my Windows games just as well as a Windows rig can (performance-wise).
4. Can Mac run ALL Windows software or are there some exceptions (background processes that might be needed or what).
5. Can Mac read and write to NTFS partitions (no so important, but I just wanted to know)?
southy
Mac CAN run Windows in the new upcoming version of the MacOS... even at the same time.

It's a new feature of OSX Leopard i think... just go to http://www.apple.com/macosx/leopard/index.html , I saw it somewhere in the previews.

Good luck!!
Sphaerenkern
Well, Mac OS X on a Intel machine can use windows-apps with CrossOver, but you could just install Windows on your Mac, so you don't have any performance issues.
vandetta
What application that you need in Windows? Try to find alternatives in Mac, some of them is better than Windows Very Happy
Handyman
You can also use darwine. It is an os x version of wine. Or there is also codeweavers crossover. If you have a copy of Windows you can dual boot with bootcamp. There is also paralells desktop where you can run windows at the same tome as OS X. Laughing
why6487
defnet wrote:
I have read on the Apple website that Mac is able to run Windows and Windows-application.

I was thinking about switchin to Mac for my personal use (do alot of soundstuff and recording), but the questions that remains are:
1. Can Mac run the Windows OS just like it was a normal PC?
2. Can I plug in a device install the Windows drivers and just work with it on a Mac computer.
3. Can Mac play my Windows games just as well as a Windows rig can (performance-wise).
4. Can Mac run ALL Windows software or are there some exceptions (background processes that might be needed or what).
5. Can Mac read and write to NTFS partitions (no so important, but I just wanted to know)?


1. No, you must install something like VMWare or Boot Camp to do this.
2. Nope.
3. In a VM, if it has lots of RAM. If Boot Camp, yes.
4. No, see answer 1 or find others like if you're going for Dev-C++, Xcode is that you need.
5. Mac OS X can only read to NTFS volumes. It can fully read and write to FAT16 and FAT32 volumes.
xbcd
i use crossover office for linux and it does great. Crossover for Mac should be fine although i do not have it to test for you. But since it is using a same if not similar engine it should perform well. And if you want it for office or some video encoding program like FU Wizard then you are in luck since they run really fast using the wine api.
defnet
So eventough new MACs come with intel processors, you still can't install Windows on em without using VMWare or BootCamp. I understand that you use VMWare to get things done, but sometimes your machine doesn't perform as wel (exactly - RAM issue). Further I will look into the BootCamp thing.

So, In a way it appears to me that MAC is just a different distro of linux.
Correct me if im wrong.
{name here}
defnet wrote:
So eventough new MACs come with intel processors, you still can't install Windows on em without using VMWare or BootCamp. I understand that you use VMWare to get things done, but sometimes your machine doesn't perform as wel (exactly - RAM issue). Further I will look into the BootCamp thing.

So, In a way it appears to me that MAC is just a different distro of linux.
Correct me if im wrong.

Mac OS X isn't even based on Linux. It, like Linux, is Unix-like, but it isn't Linux. It is based on an older operating system called BSD, which has a reputation for being stable and reliable, and is probably the reason why the Apple developers took the code instead of continuing on a series of real mode operating systems.
DarkAkira
    1. Yes you can install windows natively with the assistance of Boot Camp. Boot Camp is used to create the Fat32 Partition, and create a driver disk so all your mac's hardware will run fine in Windows. The FAT32 partition will be later formatted to NTFS during windows install. Everything that you do in windows can be done when installed on OSX. Its the same kind of hardware (minus EFI chip), just on a Mac Labeled machine.

    2. Mac is not linux. Not even close. I dont know whay you would even ask such a thing.

    3. When using a Mac, use the Mac version of your windows apps. DO not emulate (runs like ass, not worth it). Mac apps are not only written better and easier to install/uninstall, but they outperform they're windows counter-parts by far.

    4. Regardless of what most windows users think, There is nothing wrong with Macs. Technically, Macs are just like PC's. THe differences? Macs are cleaner internally, they have better air-flow, the motherbaords are not ATX, and EFI has replaced BIOS completely. Thats it. Hardware is pretty much the same stuff used on tons of other systems in the world. The biggest difference between the hardware in PC's and the Hardware in Macs is that Mac Hardware and the Mac Operating System are custom tailored to each other, which in turn provides the fastest/best Computer experience available.
brucedes
Although you do require boot camp to install windows on a mac, the download is free, and if you buy a mac after October, it comes built into leopard. In fact, to be honest, I'd hold off until October, so you get Leopard bundled with the mac/

With hardware, you don't need to worry, almost all hardware works perfectly on a mac when you plug it in, and if not, you can download drivers for lots of stuff.

If you're serious about using windows apps on a mac, Boot Camp is the best option, I think. Darwine and Crossover have far too many compatibility problems at the moment, and VMWare/Parallels cause a performance hit, and cost money. With boot camp you do need to reboot to switch from OS to OS, but it's a not exactly going to ruin the experience.
pdra05
I'm using Windows XP SP2 on bootcamp on my MacBook Pro and I'm amazed at the fact that it runs a lot faster than many other PCs!
exhaust
hi,

try vmware
run windows directly from os x
soooo you ca use all your windows progs on a Mac!
DarkAkira
exhaust wrote:
hi,

try vmware
run windows directly from os x
soooo you ca use all your windows progs on a Mac!

Parallels does this, but better. And with DIrectX 9 Game support.
brucedes
I don't like Parallels or VMWare, they're major resource ****** and slow down the emulated system.

I really don't understand why people have such a problem in rebooting to use their programs. It takes about 90 seconds all together.
DarkAkira
Well... There are a few things.

For one, I dont like to have to reboot my entire system just to use IE for a few minutes, and then reboot back to normal. Thats just stupid.

Also, but only booting into Windows, you also get windows security problems. So if you get a virus that screws up the system, it will probably screw up the OSX installation as well.

As for parallels, it really isnt a huge resource hog. As long as you have an ok amount of RAM. 2 GB is what I have, and I get absolutely no slowdown on either OS. I have my XP configured to use about 768 MB of it. At least with parallels, I get OSX security and no problems, and a few XP programs that i dont have on OSX. Not many though.
Radar
I've just started using CrossOver for Mac, and so far it seems great - Windows applications run as if they are Mac applications on the whole. It's not 100% like being on a Windows machine - lack of viewing the desktop etc. - but it seems like a nice, clean way to operate, without taking up large amount of space.

It's encouraged me to have a look at Wine and see what capabilities it has, so yeah, definitely recommend CrossOver.
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