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Science Fiction - Isaac Asimov





Zeusik
I'am great fun of science fiction of literature and the best author for me is Isaac Asimov writing in English.
Sometimes I like read criminal - horror and I'm not very original beacuse books of Stephen King seems very interesting.
cloudship
do you mean books like "davinci code"?

I am not a big fan of that, because it takes me a lot of time to understand the culture and religion background of the story. Sometimes I could just not get myself immerse into the story, so that I do not feel moved by the scene.

I would rather read history or fiction of history. That's easier to understand and imagine.
adomicilio
If we try to talking about Asimov we havve to talk about the future. I think I never could be bored with Asimov, I like to read his tales before sleep, because I can dream with different worlds, robots, technology and future... did you ever think how would be the Earth with amazing technoology?. Well, I heard that some kind of technology was inspired on a Asimov tale once.

I really liked... which one was your favorite tale?
calicamper
For Stephen King, the Dark Tower series, so far, is exemplary. I have just started the third book in the series and am hopefull. The second wasn't quite as good as the first, but still interesting.
violetgnu
Asimov!

I love his short stories. Those are the only things I've read of him, but I like the detail he goes into, and the thorough clarity of his writing. I like the one about the jokes of unknown origin.

Never actually read anything by Stephan King. I really ought to read Tommyknockers or something. He is the rock star of authorship. Everything he writes gets put at the front of book stores - but I've never actually read anything by him.
Pilot
I don't mind Asimov, but I lean towards being an Arthur C. Clarke fan to get my Science Fiction fix. I got caught in reading 2001:A Space Oddysey and proceeded to get every book I could find in the library.

I did very much enjoy Asimov's Foundation Series.
poly
Asimov is great.. very intelligent and good storytelling..
loryl
I LOVED ASIMOV.

It's a shame he died. I don't read much fiction anymore, but waaaaaaaaay back when I did, I also enjoyed Orson Scott Card's (ender's game!!!) books. I was more into fantasy though.
utamnis
Asimov is, to me, the father of sci-fi. The 'science' part is secondary in some of his writing but the political intrigue and real storytelling are wonderful.

I just finished reading the Foundation Trilogy again after 20+ years. He is the master!!
linangan
I read Isaac Asimov's Foundation for the umpteenth time. It's just about the best science fiction novel ever, even considering it's less a novel than a collected serialized story. As long as we're serenading a charmingly flat style (and I sure am; screw the fancy lads and give me a terse verse any day), I should note that Asimov is famous for his no-nonsense writing. I've been rereading Foundation for the past five years.
woodenbrick
utamnis wrote:
I just finished reading the Foundation Trilogy again after 20+ years. He is the master!!

Hey, did you know there is 7 books altogether? Just a heads up in case you weren't aware.
Definitely my favourite series of all time.
ddukki
The Gods Themselves was a fast read. Kind of hard to believe that it was written about 40 or more years ago. And even I, Robot was a great book. I'm so glad it wasn't anything like the movie. A little similar in parts, but otherwise, totally separate in concept.
Octaeder
What was the Asimov book that was based around a colony of people living on a new planet... There was a girl that the planet talked to, and if I remember the planet was on a collision course with Earth.

Could be wrong on the details, but I do remember really enjoying it. It was ages ago that I read it so my memory is seriously hazy
virre
Octaeder wrote:
What was the Asimov book that was based around a colony of people living on a new planet... There was a girl that the planet talked to, and if I remember the planet was on a collision course with Earth.

Could be wrong on the details, but I do remember really enjoying it. It was ages ago that I read it so my memory is seriously hazy


Nemesis is set at one of the first colonys. But I don't remeber if it fit what you are looking for.

---

Personally I see Asimov more as the older sibling of Sci-Fi the real fathers and mothers is before that. (Jules Verne for example)
blk3
wow, seems you guys really know a lot about Isaac Isamov, I only knew because of the movie I robot which is based on one of his novels. Although I never EVER read anything he wrote, would anyone recommend a book title by him, prefereable what you think is his best book ever, I want to start reading on that one.
virre
blk3 wrote:
wow, seems you guys really know a lot about Isaac Isamov, I only knew because of the movie I robot which is based on one of his novels. Although I never EVER read anything he wrote, would anyone recommend a book title by him, prefereable what you think is his best book ever, I want to start reading on that one.


Well you should start with Reading "I, robot" and see the differences from the film. Which should be heavy if I understand correctly (I refused to see it, due to the trailer makeing it see as it was totaly destroyed.)

I guess you should write the Foundation trillogy (Foundation, Foundation and Empire, Second Foundation) but probably the two before: Prelude to Foundation and Forward the Foundation.

You might also have some use of the Wikipedia article, espacally the biography part:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Asimov#.22Greater_Foundation.22_series
blk3
I was reading about Dr. Isamov on the wikipedia and he seems to have written quite a lot of books in his lifetime. Very impressive indeed. I think I should start of with the Foundation series.
virre
blk3 wrote:
I was reading about Dr. Isamov on the wikipedia and he seems to have written quite a lot of books in his lifetime. Very impressive indeed. I think I should start of with the Foundation series.


I to recomend at least reading Forward the Foundation before the acctual three first pulished books. Although you can read them at first, you just get a much better feel for the hole complexy of the wonderfull universe he created if you read Prelude and Forward first.
ddukki
virre wrote:
blk3 wrote:
wow, seems you guys really know a lot about Isaac Isamov, I only knew because of the movie I robot which is based on one of his novels. Although I never EVER read anything he wrote, would anyone recommend a book title by him, prefereable what you think is his best book ever, I want to start reading on that one.


Well you should start with Reading "I, robot" and see the differences from the film. Which should be heavy if I understand correctly (I refused to see it, due to the trailer makeing it see as it was totaly destroyed.)
That's true. The movie shouldn't have been called "I, Robot" or even said to be based off the novel. The only similar characteristic between the two was the 3 Robot Laws and maybe the concept of robot individuality. Even so, Asimov didn't go as far as the movie in its drama. However, if you look at the movie purely as a movie by itself, it wasn't half bad.
Radar
Isaac Asimov was an awesome science-fiction writer. Once I discovered his writings, I only really stopped once I'd read most of his works Smile

I agree that the Foundation series is fantastic, but I will say that it trailed off a bit in the chronologically later books -= Foundation's Edge, Foundation and Earth. I would definitely recommend reading them in the order they were published - because that way you get the sense of it as it built up in Isaac Asimov's head, rather than how it built up in the Foundation universe. There are things in Forward the Foundation and Prelude to Foundation that just disappear when you hit the first book.

As to I, Robot - I'm a reasonable fan of the movie, but my main problem with it is the ending. The way that the movie ended it was totally not how Asimov would have ended it. Either the logical conclusion would have been the right one, or, there would have been a deeper better logic that hadn't been thought of. Logic always won in Asimov's stories (I think I'm pretty safe in saying that). Feelings and emotion never triumphed over it, as they did in the movie.
PatTheGreat42
I like the kind of SciFi best where it takes the current world, and just changes one thing, like it throws in teleportation, or everyone depends on their PDA-mind link, or something like that, and runs with it to see what would happen.
Radar
PatTheGreat42 wrote:
I like the kind of SciFi best where it takes the current world, and just changes one thing, like it throws in teleportation, or everyone depends on their PDA-mind link, or something like that, and runs with it to see what would happen.


I'm just curious - you think Isaac Asimov's stories were that? If you're talking about his robot stories, then I don't think it was ever that. I think it was about Asimov exploring the idea and the concept for it's own sake, rather than how it affected the world as a whole. Some of his stories were along the lines of three guys and a robot that's acting weirdly, and just actually seeing what is possible for robots to achieve.

So yes. I'd disagree. I'd say that many of his stories weren't about what would happen once you introduce an element, but rather about what is possible for a given element to do.

Although, if you're talking Foundation and psychohistory maybe. If you ignore the fact that humanity is spread out over half the galaxy.
zbale
Just to make one thing clear: I, Robot is a collection of short stories (and an excellent one at that), not a novel. The movie mixes many elements from the numerous short stories and novels Asimov wrote about "Robots" (but if you've read them you might have noticed that he is interested, eventually, in people at least as much as in robots).

I think I agree with Radar that Asimov might have had a different ending had he directed the movie (especially in terms of atmosphere) but the movie still captures most of the questions that can be found in his writings. In fact, the part of the movie concerning the debate "heart vs. mind" or "human understanding vs. logic" and computers making choices for humans is indeed based on a short story of Asimov's where a similar conclusion is reached as in the movie (I think the story is called "Machines" or "The Machines", but I may be wrong). Also, in some short stories, Asimov tackled dramatic spiritual-religious aspects related to Robots (as found at the end of the movie) -- see for instance "Catch that Rabbit" (in the I, Robot collection). This is no surprise as Asimov was a versatile writer (as you know he wrote many books of pure science on the universe, the dinosaurs, etc.) and he tackled a lot of subjects, always with his very precise, seemingly undramatic writing (which makes the twists all the better), his crisp dialogues and his fantastic way of organizing the unfolding of a story.

Somebody asked what our favorites are. I love Foundation but I tend to prefer the Robot part of his work. Those who have only read the Robot short-stories (and remember, there are several collections of them) should definitely try to read the cycle of novels, and at least the first one, The Caves of Steel -- undoubtedly my favorite Asimov.
Dean_The_Great
Asimov was definitely one of the greatest sci-fi writers of all time! For all of you who love his work, I would deeply suggest you read Battlefield Earth by L. Ron Hubbard, or really anything by that guy. It's marvellous and equally good to Asimov's work.

As far as Stephen King goes, I'm a big fan. The Dark Tower series is exceptional (Just wait until book 5 when it starts to get under your skin and blow your mind!) and every other novel of his I have ever read (and I've read quite a few) is great. They have all the fast-paced action of any Bestseller fodder, but then they are written in a more visceral way.
dawndibear
I've read some of Isaac Asimov's sci-fi stuff, but found it a little too dry for my taste. However, his non-fiction work is outstanding!
I much prefer the writing styles of Robert Heinlein and Arthur Clarke. I especially like the way that Heinlein's characters mention Asimov (and Clarke) in the book "The Number of the Beast". Now that book is some fine sci-fi writing.
Kopernikus
I *love* Asimov
When I was fourteen, i stumbeled over his foundation trilogy, in the german translation...

I was hooked.

The next book was "Space cadets" by Robert A. Heinlein... great stuff!
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