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NTFS or Fat32??





pashmina
What is the advantage of using the NTFS for a hard disk? I just cannot differentiate between the fat, fat32 or NTFS file system. What will the advantage be if I use the NTFS file system or will it have more disadvantage on the system
My hardware partition goes something like this
C: 80GB fat32
D: 80GB fat32
E: 80GB fat32
F: 80GB fat32
G: 80GB NTFS
400GB SATA hard disk
should i change my D:,F:, into NTFS?????????
the zephyrus
You should not use FAT(16) since you have FAT32. FAT32 and NTFS work differently in how they deal with files, but I don't think you'd notice a performance difference.
pashmina
i heard that NTFS compress the files very well..
Alias
I use NTFS and it's much more faster than FAT16 and FAT32. Also NTFS compress files very well too. It's true! Wink
vm_yap
I like ntfs because it is much secured and faster than fat 32. of course if tyou have linux it is safe to have 1 fat32 drive but ntfs can now read linux file system using a freeware program but linux cant save it on ntfs (addidtional info) if your os is winxp or winnt ntfs is the best to go..
Bones
With an 80G partition you definately want NTFS. It is MUCH more efficient for large drives (in fact any drive over ~8G should be NTFS)
XP won't even format partitions larger than 32G in FAT32 because it is so much slower and inefficient in it's drive space usage (due to the differences in cluster size)

Also with NTFS drives you can have file and folder permissions (which are not possible with FAT32) as well as dynamic disks (if you are using XP Pro).

Windows Vista doesn't even have support for FAT32 because it is obsolete.

If I were you, I would be converting all of those FAT 32 partitions to NTFS because there is no advantage to FAT32 unless you are using very small drives. Also, the maximum file size that can be sotred on a FAT32 partition is 4G.
pashmina
Bones wrote:
With an 80G partition you definately want NTFS. It is MUCH more efficient for large drives (in fact any drive over ~8G should be NTFS)
XP won't even format partitions larger than 32G in FAT32 because it is so much slower and inefficient in it's drive space usage (due to the differences in cluster size)

Also with NTFS drives you can have file and folder permissions (which are not possible with FAT32) as well as dynamic disks (if you are using XP Pro).

Windows Vista doesn't even have support for FAT32 because it is obsolete.

If I were you, I would be converting all of those FAT 32 partitions to NTFS because there is no advantage to FAT32 unless you are using very small drives. Also, the maximum file size that can be sotred on a FAT32 partition is 4G.


Thank you for this precious information. I guess will format all besides C: to NTFS.. i too feel it secure and good..
thanks
sunpascal
I would definitely go for ntfs.
I believe that fat32 has a file size limit of 2gb. This could get particular annoying with dvd images.
As mentioned before, ntfs supports encryption and compressions and of course file system permissions, so you can set security permissions on a multiuser system. fat32 lacks this functionality.

Linux can read ntfs without problems and there are ways to write to ntfs.
You can use explore2fs to read linux partitions from windows. Alternatively, you could use a smaller fat32 partition to transfer files from one system to the other.

Even if you are running linux, I would recommend ntfs.
orcaz
The main advantage of NTFS is that it supports encryption, compression and file permissions in Windows XP. So if you are using WinXP, it is highly recommended to use NTFS instead of FAT32.
xkobram
Bones wrote:
Windows Vista doesn't even have support for FAT32 because it is obsolete.


No, because Microsoft is trying to push out old or free good programs!
That fuc*ing politics of Microsoft drives me crazy! I hate this monopol but what can i do. If i wanna paly DX10 games i have to get Vista! Sh!t...
turbosquid
NTFS "NT File System" as the name suggests came from MS's NT operating system, it offers significant improvments over the previous FAT/16/32 "File Alocation Table" system, it is faster, more secure, more robust, it also supports access control, encryption (ENTFS), and compression.

The NT system is believed to be joint effort of Microsoft and Northern Telecom.
pashmina
now i am currently running the windows xp in the fat32. i want to change my c: into ntfs. does this mean that i lose my all files in it.. is there any solution to change the c drive to ntfs without harming the windows?
or do i have to reinstall the whole system i.e. windows xp with ntfs file system.
dz9c
i am not fat. i am ntfs... ntfs = not that fata ss

N T F S
NOT THAT FATA SS

lol that is wicked funny i just made that myself
Hogwarts
Some of the major things:
Volume Shadow Copy: Used for system recovery
File Compression (ZIP files. Smile)
You can install multiple operating systems on it without partitioning it.

Use NTFS, it is far better if you're not planning on using windows 98se and lower. Make everything NTFS, trust me. Just do it Wink

Quote:
i am not fat. i am ntfs... ntfs = not that fata ss

N T F S
NOT THAT FATA SS

lol that is wicked funny i just made that myself

Dude.. That's really lame and spammy Rolling Eyes
dz9c
lol u kiddin it was funny who agrees? lol the only thing more funnier than that was your knowledge of NTFS and FAT
orcaz
xkobram wrote:

No, because Microsoft is trying to push out old or free good programs!
That fuc*ing politics of Microsoft drives me crazy! I hate this monopol but what can i do. If i wanna paly DX10 games i have to get Vista! Sh!t...

yea, quite true, thatz why ppl haf to upgrade frm 98 to xp and mebbe not long later still haf to upgrade to vista anyway, coz they juz simply push old programs off their support, and other software companies would follow suit. And i can't stand them making promises like how secure and safe their new system would be, and when aft releasing in less than a month, a whole long list of exploits surface...
ChrisP1984
pashmina wrote:
now i am currently running the windows xp in the fat32. i want to change my c: into ntfs. does this mean that i lose my all files in it.. is there any solution to change the c drive to ntfs without harming the windows?
or do i have to reinstall the whole system i.e. windows xp with ntfs file system.


Pashmina:

Changing your file system means that the hard drive will have different sized "blocks" and/or a different method of indexing the drive...

...long story short, changing the file system involves reformatting the drive; so you will lose all data on that drive including your windows installation. As far as I'm aware there is no way around it. It's not like resizing a partition, there is no practical way you can keep data on a drive while its being reformatted.
pashmina
ChrisP1984 wrote:
pashmina wrote:
now i am currently running the windows xp in the fat32. i want to change my c: into ntfs. does this mean that i lose my all files in it.. is there any solution to change the c drive to ntfs without harming the windows?
or do i have to reinstall the whole system i.e. windows xp with ntfs file system.


Pashmina:

Changing your file system means that the hard drive will have different sized "blocks" and/or a different method of indexing the drive...

...long story short, changing the file system involves reformatting the drive; so you will lose all data on that drive including your windows installation. As far as I'm aware there is no way around it. It's not like resizing a partition, there is no practical way you can keep data on a drive while its being reformatted.


now i have a clear idea about this file system. thanks ChrisP1984
tuncay
turbosquid wrote:
NTFS "NT File System" as the name suggests came from MS's NT operating system, it offers significant improvments over the previous FAT/16/32 "File Alocation Table" system, it is faster, more secure, more robust, it also supports access control, encryption (ENTFS), and compression.

The NT system is believed to be joint effort of Microsoft and Northern Telecom.


It has nothing to do with Northern Telecom. NT simply stands for New Technology as in Windows NT.

The NTFS, originally designed for Windows NT, is the file system you should be using on any drive ON your computer (not necessarily true for external drives), FAT32 is old, deprecated and obsolete for any drive on your own system. I suggest you format all your drives (again the internal ones) to NTFS.
jackill
You don`t need to format partitions to have them in NTFS. Windows has special toold to convert partitions from FAT to NTFS without loosing data. It`s very fast indeed. Read this: http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/winxppro/maintain/convertfat.mspx
Bouncer
I think you should use NTFS format, the performance will increase and it will also compress and locate files in a less random order there less time wasted infront of that boring old DeFrag screen!
TheGeek
If you are only using Windows XP or 2000 then NTFS is your best solution because it can be read faster than FAT32 and also has no hard drive size limitations (there may be some, but its very large). If however, you are using Linux and Windows side by side then you need to have at least 1 partition if not all partitions in FAT32 because that way all operating systems can share files between each other easily.
Bones
xkobram wrote:
Bones wrote:
Windows Vista doesn't even have support for FAT32 because it is obsolete.


No, because Microsoft is trying to push out old or free good programs!
That fuc*ing politics of Microsoft drives me crazy! I hate this monopol but what can i do. If i wanna paly DX10 games i have to get Vista! Sh!t...


How is dropping support for the FAT 32 file system in any way going to affect the use of old software??

And your point about DX10 games? Well there isnt even any DX10 hardware out ther yet so I don't think you will have to worry about that for a while.

That's the way business runs ..hey if you want to play blu-ray disks then you'll have to buy a blu-ray player too.

I am thinking at this point that most games that are DX10 compatible will be backwards compatible with DX9. The game companies want to make as much money as they can..so either they will be making games that support 9 and 10, or they wont be making DX10 games until they feel that the majority of the market is going to buy them.
ronald.helpdesk
NTFS vs. FAT: Which Is Right for You?

To NTFS or not to NTFS—that is the question. But unlike the deeper questions of life, this one isn't really all that hard to answer. For most users running Windows XP, NTFS is the obvious choice. It's more powerful and offers security advantages not found in the other file systems. But let's go over the differences among the files systems so we're all clear about the choice. There are essentially three different file systems available in Windows XP: FAT16, short for File Allocation Table, FAT32, and NTFS, short for NT File System.

FAT16

The FAT16 file system was introduced way back with MS–DOS in 1981, and it's showing its age. It was designed originally to handle files on a floppy drive, and has had minor modifications over the years so it can handle hard disks, and even file names longer than the original limitation of 8.3 characters, but it's still the lowest common denominator. The biggest advantage of FAT16 is that it is compatible across a wide variety of operating systems, including Windows 95/98/Me, OS/2, Linux, and some versions of UNIX. The biggest problem of FAT16 is that it has a fixed maximum number of clusters per partition, so as hard disks get bigger and bigger, the size of each cluster has to get larger. In a 2–GB partition, each cluster is 32 kilobytes, meaning that even the smallest file on the partition will take up 32 KB of space. FAT16 also doesn't support compression, encryption, or advanced security using access control lists.

FAT32

The FAT32 file system, originally introduced in Windows 95 Service Pack 2, is really just an extension of the original FAT16 file system that provides for a much larger number of clusters per partition. As such, it greatly improves the overall disk utilization when compared to a FAT16 file system. However, FAT32 shares all of the other limitations of FAT16, and adds an important additional limitation—many operating systems that can recognize FAT16 will not work with FAT32—most notably Windows NT, but also Linux and UNIX as well. Now this isn't a problem if you're running FAT32 on a Windows XP computer and sharing your drive out to other computers on your network—they don't need to know (and generally don't really care) what your underlying file system is.
Top of pageTop of page

The Advantages of NTFS

The NTFS file system, introduced with first version of Windows NT, is a completely different file system from FAT. It provides for greatly increased security, file–by–file compression, quotas, and even encryption. It is the default file system for new installations of Windows XP, and if you're doing an upgrade from a previous version of Windows, you'll be asked if you want to convert your existing file systems to NTFS. Don't worry. If you've already upgraded to Windows XP and didn't do the conversion then, it's not a problem. You can convert FAT16 or FAT32 volumes to NTFS at any point. Just remember that you can't easily go back to FAT or FAT32 (without reformatting the drive or partition), not that I think you'll want to.

The NTFS file system is generally not compatible with other operating systems installed on the same computer, nor is it available when you've booted a computer from a floppy disk. For this reason, many system administrators, myself included, used to recommend that users format at least a small partition at the beginning of their main hard disk as FAT. This partition provided a place to store emergency recovery tools or special drivers needed for reinstallation, and was a mechanism for digging yourself out of the hole you'd just dug into. But with the enhanced recovery abilities built into Windows XP (more on that in a future column), I don't think it's necessary or desirable to create that initial FAT partition.
Top of pageTop of page

When to Use FAT or FAT32

If you're running more than one operating system on a single computer (see my earlier column Multibooting Made Easy), you will definitely need to format some of your volumes as FAT. Any programs or data that need to be accessed by more than one operating system on that computer should be stored on a FAT16 or possibly FAT32 volume. But keep in mind that you have no security for data on a FAT16 or FAT32 volume—any one with access to the computer can read, change, or even delete any file that is stored on a FAT16 or FAT32 partition. In many cases, this is even possible over a network. So do not store sensitive files on drives or partitions formatted with FAT file systems.
pashmina
ronald.helpdesk wrote:
NTFS vs. FAT: Which Is Right for You?

To NTFS or not to NTFS—that is the question. But unlike the deeper questions of life, this one isn't really all that hard to answer. For most users running Windows XP, NTFS is the obvious choice. It's more powerful and offers security advantages not found in the other file systems. But let's go over the differences among the files systems so we're all clear about the choice. There are essentially three different file systems available in Windows XP: FAT16, short for File Allocation Table, FAT32, and NTFS, short for NT File System.

FAT16

The FAT16 file system was introduced way back with MS–DOS in 1981, and it's showing its age. It was designed originally to handle files on a floppy drive, and has had minor modifications over the years so it can handle hard disks, and even file names longer than the original limitation of 8.3 characters, but it's still the lowest common denominator. The biggest advantage of FAT16 is that it is compatible across a wide variety of operating systems, including Windows 95/98/Me, OS/2, Linux, and some versions of UNIX. The biggest problem of FAT16 is that it has a fixed maximum number of clusters per partition, so as hard disks get bigger and bigger, the size of each cluster has to get larger. In a 2–GB partition, each cluster is 32 kilobytes, meaning that even the smallest file on the partition will take up 32 KB of space. FAT16 also doesn't support compression, encryption, or advanced security using access control lists.

FAT32

The FAT32 file system, originally introduced in Windows 95 Service Pack 2, is really just an extension of the original FAT16 file system that provides for a much larger number of clusters per partition. As such, it greatly improves the overall disk utilization when compared to a FAT16 file system. However, FAT32 shares all of the other limitations of FAT16, and adds an important additional limitation—many operating systems that can recognize FAT16 will not work with FAT32—most notably Windows NT, but also Linux and UNIX as well. Now this isn't a problem if you're running FAT32 on a Windows XP computer and sharing your drive out to other computers on your network—they don't need to know (and generally don't really care) what your underlying file system is.
Top of pageTop of page

The Advantages of NTFS

The NTFS file system, introduced with first version of Windows NT, is a completely different file system from FAT. It provides for greatly increased security, file–by–file compression, quotas, and even encryption. It is the default file system for new installations of Windows XP, and if you're doing an upgrade from a previous version of Windows, you'll be asked if you want to convert your existing file systems to NTFS. Don't worry. If you've already upgraded to Windows XP and didn't do the conversion then, it's not a problem. You can convert FAT16 or FAT32 volumes to NTFS at any point. Just remember that you can't easily go back to FAT or FAT32 (without reformatting the drive or partition), not that I think you'll want to.

The NTFS file system is generally not compatible with other operating systems installed on the same computer, nor is it available when you've booted a computer from a floppy disk. For this reason, many system administrators, myself included, used to recommend that users format at least a small partition at the beginning of their main hard disk as FAT. This partition provided a place to store emergency recovery tools or special drivers needed for reinstallation, and was a mechanism for digging yourself out of the hole you'd just dug into. But with the enhanced recovery abilities built into Windows XP (more on that in a future column), I don't think it's necessary or desirable to create that initial FAT partition.
Top of pageTop of page

When to Use FAT or FAT32

If you're running more than one operating system on a single computer (see my earlier column Multibooting Made Easy), you will definitely need to format some of your volumes as FAT. Any programs or data that need to be accessed by more than one operating system on that computer should be stored on a FAT16 or possibly FAT32 volume. But keep in mind that you have no security for data on a FAT16 or FAT32 volume—any one with access to the computer can read, change, or even delete any file that is stored on a FAT16 or FAT32 partition. In many cases, this is even possible over a network. So do not store sensitive files on drives or partitions formatted with FAT file systems.


Thankyou for the information. Really nice reply
turbosquid
tuncay wrote:
turbosquid wrote:
NTFS "NT File System" as the name suggests came from MS's NT operating system, it offers significant improvments over the previous FAT/16/32 "File Alocation Table" system, it is faster, more secure, more robust, it also supports access control, encryption (ENTFS), and compression.

The NT system is believed to be joint effort of Microsoft and Northern Telecom.


It has nothing to do with Northern Telecom. NT simply stands for New Technology as in Windows NT.

The NTFS, originally designed for Windows NT, is the file system you should be using on any drive ON your computer (not necessarily true for external drives), FAT32 is old, deprecated and obsolete for any drive on your own system. I suggest you format all your drives (again the internal ones) to NTFS.


On my old NT4.0 box it says "NT is a trademark of Northern Telecom" therefore i would asume this to be the case? but i could be wrong Wink
dac_nip
dz9c wrote:
i am not fat. i am ntfs... ntfs = not that fata ss

N T F S
NOT THAT FATA SS

lol that is wicked funny i just made that myself


haha..modify dude.
N T F S
Not That Fat Shit!

hehe
Pikokola
hueheheh lol

but I think it's better to use 8Gbs Fat32 as the C: when you using winXP
move the Program Files & My Documents folder to the other Partition... Razz

I use that kind of thing since last year and till this time, there is no problem appears.

yeah yeah, i know, when it's about Defragmenting, It's slow like a hell!!!
briancoit
personally, i wouldnt use a FAT32 file system in a situation where an NTFS file system wouldnt cause any problems.
ravi_9793
chosing the file type depend on the type of use.NTFS provide you more security options..but using FAT 32 you can use more hard disk space.
Read more about them at
http://techhunt.org/xp/tips/windows_xp_file_systems_fat_or_ntfs
corey
Something that hasn't been mentioned at all has to do with file size. With FAT, you can't work with files larger than 2G, but on NTFS, you can. So, if you want to burn a full DVD sometime, you'll need to use NTFS.
Mgamerz
I prefer FAT32 over NTFS, because it has some serious backwards compatibility to 95. NTFS has trouble even running programs for XP, but I will change if I get Vista. FAT32 has bigger cluster, support for <4GB size(who has 4GB files?)NTFS is faster. Better size, but cannot support any other format of files so programs 2002 and on mostly. Only XP available. Tradeoff. FAT32 on XP can hold all current programs, i think.
internetjobs
NTFS file system is advace that FAT and FAT32...
NTFS has lot of features overs the others...
first one is file compression and second one is security...
it provides good security for all users. you can find it when right click the drive.

You can simply convert your volume in to NTFS without formatting your drive using convert command...

go to command prompt and type "CONVERT volume /FS:NTFS"
give your drive letter in the place of volume.
wildkill
NTFS is more safety than FAT32.
Win95 and 98 etc use FAT32 and they easy hacked than NTFS.
NTFS-Win2000, XP and Vista etc only sometimes hacked.
budazz
NTFS or FAT it doesnt matter as long as you defrag it at least twice a week... so you HardDisk will give good performance... specially if you regularly using it... My Pc was formatted to NTFS file system...
ravi_9793
corey wrote:
Something that hasn't been mentioned at all has to do with file size. With FAT, you can't work with files larger than 2G, but on NTFS, you can. So, if you want to burn a full DVD sometime, you'll need to use NTFS.

yaa..I have also found the same thing some time before..when I installed my new hard disk.I was unable to format a partion of 30gb in FAT32 using windows xp "disk manegement".....Than I used magic partion to format the drive in FAT32. Smile
ravi_9793
budazz wrote:
NTFS or FAT it doesnt matter as long as you defrag it at least twice a week... so you HardDisk will give good performance... specially if you regularly using it... My Pc was formatted to NTFS file system...

I think defragementing ur complete hard disk (in my case it is 240gb)..twice a week in a headache. Rolling Eyes I take toomuch time. Shocked

But I agree with you that we must defragement our hard disk regularly.I used to defragement once in a month. Smile
pudovkin
I thought FAT32 had a better performance (e.g. speed) over NTFS.
speedwaffle
I've not experienced faster performance with Fat, so I tend to go with NTFS for both the security and stability it offers. ALthough, if you're going to use linux, Fat can be a nice work around so you can easily transfer files from the windows opsys and linux. I haven't been able to successfully interface NTFS and linux (admittedly, I haven't spent much time trying so it may now be possible).
asciii
i suggest ntfs as i think fat will soon expire
briancoit
pudovkin wrote:
I thought FAT32 had a better performance (e.g. speed) over NTFS.


other way about.

FAT32 is outdated.
ssthanapati
I wud recommend NTFS its fast and gives better performance. ane 1 more thing i wud like 2 mention here NEVER USE NTFS AND FAT TOGETHER. it bcomes pretty slow when u transfer files frm 1 partition 2 another. Wink
xyberz
If you're using Windows XP like most of us probably are, you'll really need to go with NTFS seeing the size of your hard drives. Everything will be much better for you.

Should you have the need to use any DOS based programs then I'd recommend creating a separate small partition that uses the FAT32 table.

A really good site to check out is:

www.storagereview.com

It has probably all the information you'll ever need regarding HD and storage. I've asked many questions there personally myself and learned a lot.
blueray
by using ntfs system, you can control who can delete files from you hd. Also if you have a large hd then you should use it because fat32 could not be used for a big drive.
jay84h
FAT32 is pretty much old age compared to NTFS. FAT32 was dated popular back when DVD burners weren't went made. NTFS compresses files more better than FAT32 as well. Whenever I format I choose to partition my hard drive using NTFS.
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