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FreeBSD - Is it reliable and secure?





Alias
Hi guys, well I've just download FreeBSD to check out and try it. I'm a newbie to UNIX platforms and I think that FreeBSD would be suitable for me. Also I'm planning to use it as a web server to my web-based application projects. I just need some suggestions and conclusions in using FreeBSD as my desktop OS and as well as using it as a web server.
{name here}
Alias wrote:
Hi guys, well I've just download FreeBSD to check out and try it. I'm a newbie to UNIX platforms and I think that FreeBSD would be suitable for me. Also I'm planning to use it as a web server to my web-based application projects. I just need some suggestions and conclusions in using FreeBSD as my desktop OS and as well as using it as a web server.


FreeBSD isn't the best if you don't know how to set it up and use it - it's like Slackware only without as much of a headache when setting it up(and how it organizes itself is better that Slackware, IMO). After you get it all rigged up its a great and stable OS.
WickedGravity
{name here} wrote:

FreeBSD isn't the best if you don't know how to set it up and use it - it's like Slackware only without as much of a headache when setting it up(and how it organizes itself is better that Slackware, IMO). After you get it all rigged up its a great and stable OS.


Just about all there is to say about it really, not particularly my cup of tea, but that doesn't mean it isn't a perfectly normal, secure and functioning OS.
Alias
WickedGravity wrote:
Just about all there is to say about it really, not particularly my cup of tea, but that doesn't mean it isn't a perfectly normal, secure and functioning OS.


Sorry I didn't get your point, could you discuss it more precise so that I could be enlighten. Thanks! Smile

Btw, once you finished installing FreeBSD does it will automatically have a graphical interface just like in Windows?

Where can I buy a book that will teach me on how to install and configure the FreeBSD OS? Prefer a good book about installing and configuring FreeBSD. Wink
{name here}
Alias wrote:
WickedGravity wrote:
Just about all there is to say about it really, not particularly my cup of tea, but that doesn't mean it isn't a perfectly normal, secure and functioning OS.


Sorry I didn't get your point, could you discuss it more precise so that I could be enlighten. Thanks! Smile

Btw, once you finished installing FreeBSD does it will automatically have a graphical interface just like in Windows?

Where can I buy a book that will teach me on how to install and configure the FreeBSD OS? Prefer a good book about installing and configuring FreeBSD. Wink

No. It goes into a command line. It's a BSD variant, not Ubuntu Linux. It's not meant to spoonfeed you. Most of the things you have to configure you have to configure yourself.

To help install FreeBSD, all you need is the FreeBSD Handbook, which is available free on the FreeBSD homepage and the install CD.

Remember when setting up a user account, make sure to make it belong to the group "wheel" or you will be prevented from using su to go into admin mode in X!
Alias
Ok, I don't have that much knowledge on installing and configuring FreeBSD. Could you prefer other BSD or Linux OS that would be good for a newbie like me. Those BSD or Linux OS that have a graphical installation and easy to configure. I want to use those cool GNOME and KDE packages. Smile
{name here}
Alias wrote:
Ok, I don't have that much knowledge on installing and configuring FreeBSD. Could you prefer other BSD or Linux OS that would be good for a newbie like me. Those BSD or Linux OS that have a graphical installation and easy to configure. I want to use those cool GNOME and KDE packages. Smile

It has a text graphical user interface for the setup, and it includes GNOME and KDE. However, you have to configure some of your hardware by yourself - your sound card, graphics card, & ethernet card. Then you have to setup the OS to boot by default to GUI. It's not that hard if you read the manual, and follow the installation instructions step by step.

But, if you don't[b] want to learn how to use Unix and Unix-like OS and prefer an OS that will [b]spoonfeed you, try Ubuntu or Fedora Core.
Alias
{name here} wrote:
Alias wrote:
Ok, I don't have that much knowledge on installing and configuring FreeBSD. Could you prefer other BSD or Linux OS that would be good for a newbie like me. Those BSD or Linux OS that have a graphical installation and easy to configure. I want to use those cool GNOME and KDE packages. Smile

It has a text graphical user interface for the setup, and it includes GNOME and KDE. However, you have to configure some of your hardware by yourself - your sound card, graphics card, & ethernet card. Then you have to setup the OS to boot by default to GUI. It's not that hard if you read the manual, and follow the installation instructions step by step.

But, if you don't[b] want to learn how to use Unix and Unix-like OS and prefer an OS that will [b]spoonfeed you, try Ubuntu or Fedora Core.


I've just download Ubuntu 6.06 (Dapper Drake) and I see that it's based on Debian GNU/Linux. How about using Debian GNU/Linux is it a good OS and easy to install and configure? It's really hard for me to choose the best UNIX platform that will suite my needs since I'm a newbie sorry for that. Sad

I'm just interested on learning those UNIX platform. I'm sick and tired of maintaining my Windows XP. Also I want to try and experiment new things. Smile
{name here}
Alias wrote:
{name here} wrote:
Alias wrote:
Ok, I don't have that much knowledge on installing and configuring FreeBSD. Could you prefer other BSD or Linux OS that would be good for a newbie like me. Those BSD or Linux OS that have a graphical installation and easy to configure. I want to use those cool GNOME and KDE packages. Smile

It has a text graphical user interface for the setup, and it includes GNOME and KDE. However, you have to configure some of your hardware by yourself - your sound card, graphics card, & ethernet card. Then you have to setup the OS to boot by default to GUI. It's not that hard if you read the manual, and follow the installation instructions step by step.

But, if you don't/[b] want to learn how to use Unix and Unix-like OS and prefer an OS that will [b]spoonfeed you, try Ubuntu or Fedora Core.


I've just download Ubuntu 6.06 (Dapper Drake) and I see that it's based on Debian GNU/Linux. How about using Debian GNU/Linux is it a good OS and easy to install and configure? It's really hard for me to choose the best UNIX platform that will suite my needs since I'm a newbie sorry for that. Sad

I'm just interested on learning those UNIX platform. I'm sick and tired of maintaining my Windows XP. Also I want to try and experiment new things. Smile

Debian, like FreeBSD, is a moderately easy to configure Unix-OS. However, Debian goes a little bit farther after the setup, but a little bit less during the setup for you(select your card from a choice of X standard abbreviations for common manufacturers and cards).
trumnation
I have had experience with debian linux, FreeBSD and RedHat Linux and I would say that if you are completely new to linux you should probably go with red hat linux. I would recomend you go this route just because redhat had better documentation that comes with it and on the net, its easier to get help (there is alot of stuff on redhats website and other peoples websites) and it has tons more programs written and packaged for it, using the apt-get rather than debian and FreeBSD. You can get their RedHat fedora project version for free or your gonna have to buy it... If you are planning on doing something like starting up your own server for hosting or something like that I recomend buying it, but if you want to just learn, then don't bother buying it.
Alias
trumnation wrote:
I have had experience with debian linux, FreeBSD and RedHat Linux and I would say that if you are completely new to linux you should probably go with red hat linux. I would recomend you go this route just because redhat had better documentation that comes with it and on the net, its easier to get help (there is alot of stuff on redhats website and other peoples websites) and it has tons more programs written and packaged for it, using the apt-get rather than debian and FreeBSD. You can get their RedHat fedora project version for free or your gonna have to buy it... If you are planning on doing something like starting up your own server for hosting or something like that I recomend buying it, but if you want to just learn, then don't bother buying it.


I just want to learn how to use those UNIX-like OS. RedHat Linux is an Enterprise OS and it's too expensive for me. I'm interested to those Free Linux OS like Debian. I don't want to use those OS that will just spoonfeed me. Smile

My purpose on learning UNIX-like OS is that I don't want to stick on a single OS like Windows. Also whenever I will apply for a job as a Network Admin or a System Admin, most of the company today here in our country uses BSD and Linux as their main network and database server. So if I don't have that much knowledge on how to run those UNIX-like OS I will don't get those jobs.
{name here}
Alias wrote:
trumnation wrote:
I have had experience with debian linux, FreeBSD and RedHat Linux and I would say that if you are completely new to linux you should probably go with red hat linux. I would recomend you go this route just because redhat had better documentation that comes with it and on the net, its easier to get help (there is alot of stuff on redhats website and other peoples websites) and it has tons more programs written and packaged for it, using the apt-get rather than debian and FreeBSD. You can get their RedHat fedora project version for free or your gonna have to buy it... If you are planning on doing something like starting up your own server for hosting or something like that I recomend buying it, but if you want to just learn, then don't bother buying it.


I just want to learn how to use those UNIX-like OS. RedHat Linux is an Enterprise OS and it's too expensive for me. I'm interested to those Free Linux OS like Debian. I don't want to use those OS that will just spoonfeed me. Smile

My purpose on learning UNIX-like OS is that I don't want to stick on a single OS like Windows. Also whenever I will apply for a job as a Network Admin or a System Admin, most of the company today here in our country uses BSD and Linux as their main network and database server. So if I don't have that much knowledge on how to run those UNIX-like OS I will don't get those jobs.

FreeBSD will be your best choice for that - neither spoonfeeding like Fedora or Ubuntu nor as raw and difficult as Gentoo(which is the most customizeable but most difficult OS to use in all popular Linux distros).
corey
Alias wrote:
WickedGravity wrote:
Just about all there is to say about it really, not particularly my cup of tea, but that doesn't mean it isn't a perfectly normal, secure and functioning OS.


Sorry I didn't get your point, could you discuss it more precise so that I could be enlighten. Thanks! Smile

Btw, once you finished installing FreeBSD does it will automatically have a graphical interface just like in Windows?

Where can I buy a book that will teach me on how to install and configure the FreeBSD OS? Prefer a good book about installing and configuring FreeBSD. Wink
Try O'reilly
Alias
Ok, I've decided to just go for Debian GNU/Linux. I've just seen the difference between the two OS in www.polishlinux.org, I see that Debian GNU/Linux has a lot more software packages than FreeBSD and is used for both desktop and server purposes while FreeBSD is only used for file and web server and is really not intended for desktop use. Since I just want to try and experiment new OS maybe learning how to use Debian GNU/Linux is a good starting point for me. However, someday I might install FreeBSD in my desktop computer and try to learn how to use it.
{name here}
Alias wrote:
Ok, I've decided to just go for Debian GNU/Linux. I've just seen the difference between the two OS in www.polishlinux.org, I see that Debian GNU/Linux has a lot more software packages than FreeBSD and is used for both desktop and server purposes while FreeBSD is only used for file and web server and is really not intended for desktop use. Since I just want to try and experiment new OS maybe learning how to use Debian GNU/Linux is a good starting point for me. However, someday I might install FreeBSD in my desktop computer and try to learn how to use it.

Not true. FreeBSD, with the linux emulation package on the CD, can use just about any package Debian has.
urangkayo
if security is the first thing for you, you must try OpenBSD, you can look here http://www.openbsd.org/

this OS build with security minded
Alias
{name here} wrote:
Alias wrote:
Ok, I've decided to just go for Debian GNU/Linux. I've just seen the difference between the two OS in www.polishlinux.org, I see that Debian GNU/Linux has a lot more software packages than FreeBSD and is used for both desktop and server purposes while FreeBSD is only used for file and web server and is really not intended for desktop use. Since I just want to try and experiment new OS maybe learning how to use Debian GNU/Linux is a good starting point for me. However, someday I might install FreeBSD in my desktop computer and try to learn how to use it.

Not true. FreeBSD, with the linux emulation package on the CD, can use just about any package Debian has.


Really? But I've decided to just go for Debian and its seems to be that Debian is much more easy to learn than FreeBSD. Also, I think that it is a good starting point to learn how to use UNIX. Maybe I will install and then try how to use FreeBSD OS in my desktop PC someday. Anyway, thanks for the information and advices {name here} I really appreciate it.
TheGeek
FreeBSD is not for beginners, its difficult to setup and hard to start with if you are not familiar with the Unix based environment. You should start with something like Debian or Ubuntu if you want to get a taste of Unix based OSes before drinking the whole pool.

Then again, I started in Slackware...so weird things do happen...
ahmrahtcheer
My suggestion regarding *BSD is dependent on several issues.

First, what are your needs? Is the box going to be used as a server, a games platform, a sandbox or in an enterprise-style function?

Second, what kind of box are you going to be installing on? Is it an up-to-date setup (64 bit CPU, 1gb or more RAM, etc.?) Or, is it an older system?

Third, what level of computer user are you? Are you a full-fledged geek who thinks nothing of compiling software from source, and writing your own on occasion?

These will tend to point you toward certain OS's, and may limit you in regards OS's, and GUIs, too.

For example, I'm currently using an old IBM ThinkPad 380z, 300MHz Pentium-II, 96mb RAM and 4gb hard drive. The relative lack of speed and definite lack of RAM effectively shut out using GNOME or KDE as my desktop GUI, regardless of what my preferences might be. It also makes things painfully slow when using some of the "big name" Linux distros (SuSe, RedHat, Mandriva, Ubuntu, to name a few).

I use this box primarily for internet and as a word processor. I play tunes on it, but only play simple games. I don't USUALLY do any compiling, but will, if the need arises.

I classify myself as a moderately hardcore *nix Geek: my desktop computer is set up with SourceMage Linux, a distro that is entirely compiled from source (It's like Gentoo, but faster & easier to set up, with friendlier folks on the help channel).

For my purposes on this older laptop, Slackware 11 is entirely suitable, but I've also used NetBSD on it, and liked it equally well. In both instances, the hardware is well supported.

My family has 3 desktop computers and 3 laptops. The predominant OS is Slackware, with 2 of my 4 children using it, then Edubuntu (the other 2), then Debian-stable and LPLinux (1 install each).

The main differences in the actual implementation of these various OS's is in the GUI. Edubuntu comes with GNOME, and I've kept that as the default on those installs (if you're counting...the kids' desktop has 4 different Linux installations, to cut down on fighting). One of the kids' Slackware installs uses XFCE4, the other uses WindowMaker. The Debian install uses Fluxbox, and I use WindowMaker on all my installations.

When asked what distro I suggest for new users, assuming reasonably modern hardware, I usually suggest Ubuntu or MEPIS. If the person is hardware constrained, then Debian becomes a possibility, as does MEPISlite. For extremely constrained systems (Pentium I and older), DSL, PuppyLinux, LPLinux, or POSSIBLY NetBSD, if you want an up-to-date OS, or one of the older versions of Slackware (7.0 or earlier)... If constrained enough, you might want to consider dropping the GUI and sticking with the command line. There's lots of nice CLI software for *nix.

My experience with the "big name" distros like RedHat, SuSe & Mandriva is that they tend to be bigger & slower than the "also-rans" but they may be the best choice in some instances. I do like BSD...a lot, but it's not especially user-friendly, and the help channels tend to be pretty stiff with total n00bs...it's best to have a solid grounding in *nix before tangling with any of the BSDs.

If you're a hardcore geek, then source-based is the way to go, although I'd steer clear of Gentoo (overly complicated installation as source-based, for minimal gains) and go with CRUX Linux, SourceMage Linux or perhaps one of the BSDs.

One final point: my kids are ages 11 and under. The three older kids (11, 11 and 9) all installed their own OS's, and maintain them, without my assistance, except on rare occasions. So much for the difficulty in installing *nixes...

Just my .02...
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