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Who likes Classic books?





ryukenden
I like classic books such as "Gone with the Wind" and "Wuthering Heights" etc...
I like them as I could imagine how people's life was so simple previously (there was no TV, internet and cars). Nowadays we spend lot of time infront of TV or computer and it is in a way waste of time as we could not spend as much time with family as people in previous centuries. But anyway, it is my opinion.

Who else likes classic books?
Montressor
How classic are you talking about? I like Beowulf, also enjoy Shakespeare etc. I also enjoy "classical" science fiction like Huxley's Brave New World, which you may or may not classify as classic
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is classic detective fiction and I enjoy his works
Poe and Shelly are classic horror
And yes, I do enjoy the satirical society pieces by Jane Austin and several of her contemporaries.
So which classic are you searching for?
palavra
i read enough classic books when i was in high school.

i don't like to read the same book second time.

but
i prefer to listen as audio-book.
lyddi8
Wuthering Heights and Gone with the Wind are definitely in my top 10 books of all time. I totally know what you are saying- wouldn't it be wonderful to not have the temptations of modern technology for even a part of your life! (although the flipside does seem a bit boring long term Wink)
A classic novel transcends time, place, culture and class, because the issues at the core are emphatically human and therefore inescapable.
Both GWTW and WH are classic books, regardless of when they were written.
ddukki
I just finished Seamus Heaney's translation of Beowulf last night and I have to say, it wasn't half as bad as I thought it would be. I couldn't read the Iliad for the most part because of its length of detail and seemingly unnecessary naming of characters. I know that's a wrong reason for not completing a book, but I will try to finish it later.

Classics are the source of our language as it is now, and it gives us a view into other times when life was so much different, but that much the same. I don't know if that made sense, but you can quote me on it.
Shike
Before I answer, I wonder what you mean by classic? Initially when I think of classics I refer to Greek and roman texts, but then, since I like to expand my horizons, I read, also, the ancient chinese texts, such as the I Ching and Tao Te Ching.

If you are referring to more recent texts, I guess you could say that I do, but I generally read most "classic" fantisy literature (such as LOTR) but generally read more modern Fantasy.

I do have quite a collection of "classics" including a Translation of Beowulf(with the Anglo-Saxon side by side with modern English), the Odyssey, and other classic greek texts. I have a copy of the Tao Te Ching as well as the Bible and Koran. I also have many different "classic" philosophy such as The Republic and The Five Diologues by Plato.

I also have a translation of the Mabanogion (Celtic Welsh Myth) among other books realted to mythology.
jipmerite
Gone with the Wind is a good book. One of my favourites is Of Mice and Men. I have read Lord Of The Rings half a dozen times. Is that a classic? Shakespear is ofcourse at the top of great classic literature; I acknowledge that but I can not go through reading them all for leasure.

Of course most people do not find time to read these days. Especially the classics. Too much TV and internet apart from working or studying. But I do still read recent bestsellers by John Grisham etc when I get the time.
Shike
Sad to say, I agree with you. Reading is becoming a rare past time in this day and age.

I wish it weren't so.
Bruhna
I classic book taste, taste very to read books of the author Shakespeare...
moonblade
I enjoy the classics a great deal - especially Charles Dickens. It's good that way, too, as studying languages and literature requires us to read lots of classic literature, from Beowulf (in the original Old English) to Shakespeare to Jane Austen. Have to say that Pierce Plowman still makes me snore, though.
dedicatedtolkien
If by classic, you mean stuff like Tolkien, or other old fantasy syle books, I'd say that they're some of my favorite literature, but as far as authors like Charles Dickens, I can barely stand to read him.
Zampano
If you believe The Maltese Falcon is a classic, then I suppose I like them.
Actually I basically like all classics stories, but not reading them; I've been ruined by SparkNotes. Sad
flintstonian
Well I guess the label 'classic' simply scares off novice readers. I was one who got scared easily, and I missed reading may of the classic-labelled books until recently. Now, thank God, I've got over the fear. I'd say that any book labelled classic is as good as any bestseller you'd see on the racks these days, as it has to have endured may years of readership already.
Citizen Kane
Talking about classics: The devine comedy by dante Alighieri. 14th century and DAMN hard to read.

Originally the book is made of poms of three sentences. It's three chapters all contain exactly 33 three "canti" containing 100 of those poms. For the first chapter there is an extra "canto", bringing the total to exactly 100.

The numer 33 represents the year in which Christ died. The number 100 was in that age a number of perfectness.

For those of you who want to read about it:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Divine_Comedy.
qebab
The Divine Comedy is one of the few books I had to give up reading before I finished it. I might have finished it if I tried reading it in my native language, but I couldn't find one, and I simply couldn't cope with the form in which it is written, and the "old" language in it.

As for my favorite classics, I really have enjoyed everything I have read by Tolstoy, Gogol and Dostoyevsky so far (I had a "russian" period a year ago), excellent books, full of thoughts and ideas. Then, there is Thomas Mann, and "newer" classics like Orwell and Huxley that I enjoyed reading.

But the favorite will remain Don Quixote. Smile
sondosia
I don't...I feel bad for saying that, but I really don't. I've liked only a few classics thus far and disliked the vast majority of them. They don't apply to my life, I can't identify with the characters, and it's just bad.
MrBlueSky
Citizen Kane wrote:
Talking about classics: The devine comedy by dante Alighieri. 14th century and DAMN hard to read.

Originally the book is made of poms of three sentences. It's three chapters all contain exactly 33 three "canti" containing 100 of those poms. For the first chapter there is an extra "canto", bringing the total to exactly 100.

The numer 33 represents the year in which Christ died. The number 100 was in that age a number of perfectness.

For those of you who want to read about it:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Divine_Comedy.


Yeah, I read it. Only because it's a classic (as in classic, not the way the TS means Smile ).

Also "Faustus" from Goethe, Homer, Tolstoj, Tsjechov, Dostovjesky, James Joyce (Ullysus), Proust, Camus, Sartre, Rilke, Salinger, Diderot, Flaubert, etc. All extremely boring. Why did I ever read those monsters? I guess I was young and naieve..

Now I stick to Ludlum, Crighton, Forsyth et.al. and the occasional Umberto Eco.
evanc88
MrBlueSky wrote:
Citizen Kane wrote:
Talking about classics: The devine comedy by dante Alighieri. 14th century and DAMN hard to read.

Originally the book is made of poms of three sentences. It's three chapters all contain exactly 33 three "canti" containing 100 of those poms. For the first chapter there is an extra "canto", bringing the total to exactly 100.

The numer 33 represents the year in which Christ died. The number 100 was in that age a number of perfectness.

For those of you who want to read about it:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Divine_Comedy.


Yeah, I read it. Only because it's a classic (as in classic, not the way the TS means Smile ).

Also "Faustus" from Goethe, Homer, Tolstoj, Tsjechov, Dostovjesky, James Joyce (Ullysus), Proust, Camus, Sartre, Rilke, Salinger, Diderot, Flaubert, etc. All extremely boring. Why did I ever read those monsters? I guess I was young and naieve..

Now I stick to Ludlum, Crighton, Forsyth et.al. and the occasional Umberto Eco.


I actually thought the Divine Comedy, save Purgatorio, was extremely, extremely interesting and amazing to read. I also really love HOmer, Dostoevsky, Camus (especially Camus), Sartre, Salinger and Flaubert. I don't find any of them boring in the least. In fact, Dostoevsky is one of the most insightful writers of the past few centuries, I think. I love when a book makes you feel like you understand yourself better for having read it, kind of like how Winston feels after reading "the book" in 1984. I have a "Foucault's Pendulum" by Eco, but haven't read it yet.
MrBlueSky
evanc88 wrote:

I actually thought the Divine Comedy, save Purgatorio, was extremely, extremely interesting and amazing to read. I also really love HOmer, Dostoevsky, Camus (especially Camus), Sartre, Salinger and Flaubert. I don't find any of them boring in the least. In fact, Dostoevsky is one of the most insightful writers of the past few centuries, I think. I love when a book makes you feel like you understand yourself better for having read it, kind of like how Winston feels after reading "the book" in 1984. I have a "Foucault's Pendulum" by Eco, but haven't read it yet.


I expressed myself badly. I meant that I found them boring, which of course says more about me than about the books. All these authors are held in high regards by their peers and/or people who are able to judge the merits of good writing, which is why I read them in the first place. I'm just not able to enjoy these kind of books (well, most of them).
budiman
Jules Verne (1828-1905), French writer and pioneer of science fiction, whose best known works are Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (first pub.1870, transl. to English, 1873) and Around the World in Eighty Days (1873).
missdixy
I love some classics, but there are some I like to stay away from. Such as most of Jane Austen's work...I'm not sure why, I just never got into much of it.
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