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Authors that don't suck.





yimaw
In other words, your favorite author and why. I'm guessing a lot of people are going to give the most common responses (J.R.R. Tolkien, J.K. Rowling, etc.), but please try to include less common authors also. This thread has a duel aim: discussing authors as well as introducing people to new genres, authors, novels, etc.

I'll go first:

My favorite authors are James Clavel (Shogun), Barbara Kingsolver (The Poisonwood Bible), and Yukio Mishima (The Sailor Who Fell From the Grace with the Sea).
Derleth

  • Isaac Asimov: I, Robot, the Foundation novels, and too much short fiction and nonfiction to mention.
  • Arthur C. Clarke: 2001, 2010 (both better than the movies), the Rama novels.
  • Robert Heinlein: The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, Stranger in a Strange Land, Starship Troopers (the movie sucked, the book is amazing), The Door Into Summer, The Cat who Walks Through Walls, and more.
  • Ray Bradbury: Fahrenheit 451, The Martian Chronicles, S is for Space, The Toynbee Convector, The Golden Apples of the Sun, The October Country, and a lot more.
  • Stanislaw Lem: The Cyberiad.
  • William Gibson: Neuromancer, The Gernsback Continuum.
  • Ernest Hemingway: To Have and Have Not.
  • Hunter S. Thompson: Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (again, better than the movie).
Monkeydog
John Sandford if you like Detective and mystery novels.I love his Prey series I got so hooked on the first book when i read it(and honestly...i never read outside of RPG Videogames)
i would say Agatha Christy too but she is a little bit more well known then others.
Kit
I really enjoy reading... Matthew Reilly.

Yes he is brash and over the top. Yes the content is written for those with the literature ability of a two year old but still, he is the ebst quick read auther ever.
[Ice Station, Area51, HoverCar Racer, Scarecrow]

Also Mark Haddon [The curious incedent of the dog in the night time] is worth a mention as being a stragne, reclusive author and a extraverted person. The best book of 2004.

I'm hoping someone new will come along before the end of this year.
boringest
dan brown - da vinci code
amy tan - joy luck club, kitchen god's wife, etc
stephen king

can't remember the rest.. =P
frozenecko
I absolutely adore Dean Koontz. My favorite book by him is "Intensity". The title itself is VERY perfect for the book. AMAZING imagery (sp?) and such an awesome use of dialect.

I also love V.C. Andrews, the writer of the flowers in the attic series. Soooo awesome. The 3rd book is a bit out of place, but such a good writer none the less!!
iblislux
Hn, there are a lot. Let's see:

Frank Herbert's Dune series for the sci-fi books. The best hands-down. He can really create a whole world and philosophy, kinda like Tolkien, but much more elaborate.

Italo Calvino's books are the best of the fantastic tales. If on a Winter's Night a Traveller is highly recommended. It involves you in a tale similar to the Arabian Nights only to surprise you in the end.

I liked Salman Rushdie's The Moor's Last Sigh, even though I didn't like his other books. This one is a rich panorama of India, with a mixture of the fantastic as well.

Saul Bellow's Herzog and Humboldt's Gift. Imagine Woody Allen condensed in a book. They're both very digressive, neurotic and complex. Some background reading is needed.

I could go on, but I'd never end... Smile
iblislux
Yesterday I had to go and never finished my list... Some of my all-times favourites:

Guy de Maupassant
He is from the French Realism, and his tales are on the border of the
known world and the psychological thriller. Oh ja, his master was the well-known Gustave Flaubert. But Maupassant was never good at long novels as him. His Notre Coeur sucked. Short stories I liked:
    Ball of Fat and other Tales of War

    The Horla and other Fantastic Tales


Umberto Eco
I don't really have to introduce this author. The thing I dislike about him is his perfectionism. He gives too much irrelevant details. But the following book I liked very much: his dabble at fantasy.
    Baudolino


Jorge Luis Borges
The best post-modern short fiction writer. Or maybe he's not post-modern? Ah, who cares? Anyway, he writes beautifully the most disturbing and philosophical stories ever.
    Fictions

    The Book of Sand


Cortázar
Digressive, fragmented, complex and intriguing. Here's Cortázar for you.
    Hopscotch


Stopping here. More to come later. Wink
Xavier
My Fav authors are:

Sidney Sheldon: The Rage Of Angels, If Tomorrow Comes & Stranger In The Mirror
Sheldon is a real master in making the reader relate himself to the charactors in his novels! He's a master of bending & manupulating human emotions!

Dan Brown : Da Vinci Code, Angels & Demons
I'm completely smitten after reading the Da Vinci Code & Angels and Demons. I really appreciate the author's research on the topic that the books talk about! He simply is very unconventional!!

Ken Follett : Code To Zero
This Sci Fi Book is highly recommended! The author makes the reader undergo everything that the main charactor goes through! This book has a blend of all shades of emotions!
RA
C.S. Lewis
- The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe
- The Chronicles of Narnia
azaghal
J.R.R. Tolkien John Ronald Reuel Tolkien, as he was christened, was born in Bloemfontein, South Africa in 1892. His early and barely memorable years were spent divided between the city and a country farm. His father, an English banker, was making efforts to establish a branch in that country. Many of Tolkien's early memories of South Africa, including an incident when he was bitten by a tarantula while visiting a rural district, are reported to have influenced his later works.
He left South Africa to return to England with his mother and his brother, Hilary. His father, Arthur, was supposed also to return to England within the next few months. However, Arthur Tolkien died of rheumatic fever while still in South Africa. This left the grieving family in relatively dire straights and on a very limited income.

They soon moved to Birmingham, England, so that young Tolkien could attend King Edward VI school. His mother, Mabel, converted to Catholicism and the religion would have a long lasting effect on young Tolkien. The family was befriended by the Parish Priest, Father Francis Morgan, who would see the Tolkiens through some troubled times.

An avid reader, Tolkien was influenced by some of the great writers of his day including G.K. Chesterton and H.G. Wells. It was during this period of financial hardship, but intellectual stimulation that Tolkien suffered the loss of his devoted mother. She succumbed to diabetes in 1904 when Tolkien was only 12 years of age.

Father Morgan took over as his guardian, placing him first with an aunt and then at a boarding house for orphans. It was at this boarding house, at the age of 16 that he would meet and fall in love with Edith Bratt. Naturally, their relationship was frowned upon. Tolkien and Edith were caught in affectionate circumstances - they bicycled together out to the countryside surrounding the city and had a picnic.

Edith became somewhat of an obsession for Tolkien, and his guardian, Father Morgan, determined to separate the young couple. For, it seemed that their relationship was interfering with Tolkien's studies and leaving him ill-prepared to take exams to enter college. This was driven home to him when he failed to enter the college on his first try. Tolkien temporarily swore off the love of his life an knuckled down to the work at hand. On his second try he succeeded in obtaining a scholarship to Oxford.

Throughout his life, Tolkien had cultivated a love of language, especially ancient languages. At Oxford he would major in philology, which is the study of words and language. He would be much influenced by Icelandic, Norse and Gothic mythology. Even some of the characters and place names he would later develop would be drawn from the names from ancient sagas. The forest of Mirkwood, which played a prominent roll in both "The Hobbit" and in "The Lord of the Rings" was borrowed from Icelandic mythology. The names of many of the dwarves in "The Hobbit" were actual placenames in the myths.

Having reached the age of maturity in 1914, while still attending college, he looked up his lost love, Edith Bratt, and proposed marriage. She had accepted a proposal from another quarter, but in the end was persuaded to return to Tolkien. They would marry in 1916.

World War I, the war to end all wars, came in 1914. It would forever mark the end of many of the Empires of Europe and would unleash death across the European Continent. Tolkien lost many of his friends in the war, and he himself would serve as an officer on the front lines at the Battle of the Somme. He caught trench fever in 1917 and was sent back to England to recuperate. He would not see front line service again.

Throughout his schooldays he had been a determined poet and scholar. His interest in language was such that he had even developed his own languages based loosely on Finnish and Welsh. It was while recuperating in Birmingham, with his wife at his side, that he began to create a mythology behind his languages. This work would one day result in his famous books.

It was about this time that Tolkien was blessed with the first of his four children. After the war he was offered a professorship at the University of Leeds. Besides lecturing, he continued work on his mythology. He felt that he, in a sense, was creating England's mythology.

In 1925 Tolkien with a colleague published a translation and analysis of "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight." It was a turning point in his career. It brought him notice at Oxford where he was offered the professorship of Anglo-Saxon.

"The Hobbit", the work that would make him famous, came out in 1936. He began it one evening while grading exam papers. Seated at his desk, he opened up an exam booklet to find the first page blank. He was surprised and pleased that the student had somehow entirely skipped the page. It seemed an invitation to write, and in that space he began his work on "The Hobbit".

The finished manuscript of "The Hobbit" fell into the hands of George Allen and Unwin, Publishers. Unwin paid his ten year old son a shilling to read the story and report on its publishability. The young man lavished praise on the book, and Unwin decided to take a risk on it.

"The Hobbit" soon became a best seller and made Professor Tolkien famous. He was already well-known as a scholar for his work in Philology, and he was also part of a group of friends who called themselves the Inklings. The center of this group was C.S. Lewis who would long be one of Tolkien's best friends and admirers.

In the late 1930's Tolkien began writing the "Lord of the Rings". Work on the story would go on for ten and a half years. He gave first chance at publication to Allen & Unwin, the publishers of "The Hobbit". But it was rejected by a staff editor when Unwin was away on business in France. The younger "Unwin" was now in the family publishing business. He found out about the rejected manuscript, wrote to his father in France, requesting permission to take on the project. Recalling the success of "The Hobbit", but skeptical about a "hobbit book" written for adults, he acquiesced to his son's request reluctantly.

"The Lord of the Rings" was published in three parts and would become a huge publishing success.

Fame and fortune were both a blessing and a bane for Tolkien. He enjoyed the popularity of his work. Yet, he was burdened with work responding to his adoring public. After his retirement at Oxford, he and his wife Edith moved to Bournemouth in 1966. Edith died in 1971. The loss of his life's companion did not sit well with Tolkien; yet he struggled on for some two years till his death of Pneumonia on 2 September 1973.
azaghal
J.R.R. Tolkien John Ronald Reuel Tolkien, as he was christened, was born in Bloemfontein, South Africa in 1892. His early and barely memorable years were spent divided between the city and a country farm. His father, an English banker, was making efforts to establish a branch in that country. Many of Tolkien's early memories of South Africa, including an incident when he was bitten by a tarantula while visiting a rural district, are reported to have influenced his later works.
He left South Africa to return to England with his mother and his brother, Hilary. His father, Arthur, was supposed also to return to England within the next few months. However, Arthur Tolkien died of rheumatic fever while still in South Africa. This left the grieving family in relatively dire straights and on a very limited income.

They soon moved to Birmingham, England, so that young Tolkien could attend King Edward VI school. His mother, Mabel, converted to Catholicism and the religion would have a long lasting effect on young Tolkien. The family was befriended by the Parish Priest, Father Francis Morgan, who would see the Tolkiens through some troubled times.

An avid reader, Tolkien was influenced by some of the great writers of his day including G.K. Chesterton and H.G. Wells. It was during this period of financial hardship, but intellectual stimulation that Tolkien suffered the loss of his devoted mother. She succumbed to diabetes in 1904 when Tolkien was only 12 years of age.

Father Morgan took over as his guardian, placing him first with an aunt and then at a boarding house for orphans. It was at this boarding house, at the age of 16 that he would meet and fall in love with Edith Bratt. Naturally, their relationship was frowned upon. Tolkien and Edith were caught in affectionate circumstances - they bicycled together out to the countryside surrounding the city and had a picnic.

Edith became somewhat of an obsession for Tolkien, and his guardian, Father Morgan, determined to separate the young couple. For, it seemed that their relationship was interfering with Tolkien's studies and leaving him ill-prepared to take exams to enter college. This was driven home to him when he failed to enter the college on his first try. Tolkien temporarily swore off the love of his life an knuckled down to the work at hand. On his second try he succeeded in obtaining a scholarship to Oxford.

Throughout his life, Tolkien had cultivated a love of language, especially ancient languages. At Oxford he would major in philology, which is the study of words and language. He would be much influenced by Icelandic, Norse and Gothic mythology. Even some of the characters and place names he would later develop would be drawn from the names from ancient sagas. The forest of Mirkwood, which played a prominent roll in both "The Hobbit" and in "The Lord of the Rings" was borrowed from Icelandic mythology. The names of many of the dwarves in "The Hobbit" were actual placenames in the myths.

Having reached the age of maturity in 1914, while still attending college, he looked up his lost love, Edith Bratt, and proposed marriage. She had accepted a proposal from another quarter, but in the end was persuaded to return to Tolkien. They would marry in 1916.

World War I, the war to end all wars, came in 1914. It would forever mark the end of many of the Empires of Europe and would unleash death across the European Continent. Tolkien lost many of his friends in the war, and he himself would serve as an officer on the front lines at the Battle of the Somme. He caught trench fever in 1917 and was sent back to England to recuperate. He would not see front line service again.

Throughout his schooldays he had been a determined poet and scholar. His interest in language was such that he had even developed his own languages based loosely on Finnish and Welsh. It was while recuperating in Birmingham, with his wife at his side, that he began to create a mythology behind his languages. This work would one day result in his famous books.

It was about this time that Tolkien was blessed with the first of his four children. After the war he was offered a professorship at the University of Leeds. Besides lecturing, he continued work on his mythology. He felt that he, in a sense, was creating England's mythology.

In 1925 Tolkien with a colleague published a translation and analysis of "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight." It was a turning point in his career. It brought him notice at Oxford where he was offered the professorship of Anglo-Saxon.

"The Hobbit", the work that would make him famous, came out in 1936. He began it one evening while grading exam papers. Seated at his desk, he opened up an exam booklet to find the first page blank. He was surprised and pleased that the student had somehow entirely skipped the page. It seemed an invitation to write, and in that space he began his work on "The Hobbit".

The finished manuscript of "The Hobbit" fell into the hands of George Allen and Unwin, Publishers. Unwin paid his ten year old son a shilling to read the story and report on its publishability. The young man lavished praise on the book, and Unwin decided to take a risk on it.

"The Hobbit" soon became a best seller and made Professor Tolkien famous. He was already well-known as a scholar for his work in Philology, and he was also part of a group of friends who called themselves the Inklings. The center of this group was C.S. Lewis who would long be one of Tolkien's best friends and admirers.

In the late 1930's Tolkien began writing the "Lord of the Rings". Work on the story would go on for ten and a half years. He gave first chance at publication to Allen & Unwin, the publishers of "The Hobbit". But it was rejected by a staff editor when Unwin was away on business in France. The younger "Unwin" was now in the family publishing business. He found out about the rejected manuscript, wrote to his father in France, requesting permission to take on the project. Recalling the success of "The Hobbit", but skeptical about a "hobbit book" written for adults, he acquiesced to his son's request reluctantly.

"The Lord of the Rings" was published in three parts and would become a huge publishing success.

Fame and fortune were both a blessing and a bane for Tolkien. He enjoyed the popularity of his work. Yet, he was burdened with work responding to his adoring public. After his retirement at Oxford, he and his wife Edith moved to Bournemouth in 1966. Edith died in 1971. The loss of his life's companion did not sit well with Tolkien; yet he struggled on for some two years till his death of Pneumonia on 2 September 1973.
rip8fan1
Piers Anthony - Xanth Series, Bio of a Space Tyrant Series, Geodyssey Series, The Apprentice Adepth Series, Mode Series, Incarnations of Immortality Series, and many other single books, and series.

Isaac Asimov - Robot Novels, Foundation Series, Magical Worlds of Isaac Asimove (Short Stories), and his Lucky Starr Books (writing as Paul French).

Douglas Adams - Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy Series.

Clive Barker - Books of Blood (short stories), and many of his other horror stories.

Lilian Jackson Braun - The Cat Who... Series.

Dan Brown - All of his.

Orson Scott Card - Tales of Alvin Maker Series, HomeComing Series, and Ender Wiggins Series. Also Treason, and Lost Boys.

Tom Clancy - Many of the books that have been made into movies.

Clive Cussler - Dirk Pitt Series, and Kurt Austin Adventures. He also has some 'true life' books about finding lost sea wrecks, and they are good.

Stephen R. Donaldson - The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever Series, and Mordant's Need Series.

Tim Dorsey - Orange Crush, The Stingray Shuffle, Florida Roadkill, Triggerfish Twist, and others that are so funny!!

Alan Dean Foster - All of his.

Kate Elliott - Crown of Stars Series.

Raymond E. Feist - All of his.

Cornelia Funke - All of hers.

Terry Goodkind - Sword of Truth Series.

Robert Heinlein - All of his.

Homer - The Odyssey.

L. Ron Hubbard - All of his science fiction, especially Battlefield Earth (way better than the movie), and the Mission Earth Series.

Brian Jacques - Redwall Series.

Robert Jordan - The Wheel of Time Series.

Jonathon Kellerman - Alex Delaware Series.

Stephen King - I much prefer his earlier work.

Dean Koontz - I also much prefer his earlier work.

Robert Ludlum - All of his.

Brian Lumley - The Necroscope Series.

Anne McCaffrey - Her Dragon books.

Larry Niven - All of his.

Christopher Paolini - Only has two books, but I like them very much.

Terry Pratchett - Discworld Series.

Anne Rice - The Vampire Chronicles.

J.D. Robb - In Death series of books.

J.K. Rowling - Harry Potter Series.

Fred Saberhagen - The Lost Swords Series.

R.A. Salvatore - All of his.

Robert Silverberg - All of his.

Dan Simmons - All of his.

Neal Stephenson - All of his.

J.R.R. Tolkien - Lord of the Rings Series.

Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman - Chronicles: 1) Dragons of Autumn Twilight; 2) Dragons of Winter Night; 3) Dragons of Spring Dawning. They also have many other books that I like.

Tad Williams - Otherland Series.

Roger Zelazny - The Chronicles of Amber Series.


Series that are done by more than one author:
Doctor Who Series
Star Trek Series - original series only.
Star Wars Novels



I didn't go into too much detail, but if you want me to expand on any of these authors, and their offerings, let me know.[/b]
LeviticusMky
Neil Gaiman - A modern fantasy writer, his novels are so real that it doesn't feel like fantasy. He writes mosly modern day, but he's got a couple of books out that are more ancient-setting novels. If you want a great weekend read, get "American Gods"

Lian Hearn - Wrote a trilogy of asian-themed fantasy books that are wonderful. Again, very real, not over the top like all the forgotten realms stuff.

Kurt Vonnegut - The quintessential clever comedy/halfscifi/witty story-weaver. Vonnegut is a must read for anyone who likes reading.

Douglas Adams - The "hitchhiker's guide" is the funniest series ever written.

Already Mentioned - Frank Herbert, Neal Stephanson
Tasukii
Richard Matheson, father and son: their novels are really good, horror in a very good style, you always remember them, really, that so disturbing, so good...
Hikaru7
I forgot the author, but I like the novel Watership Down, quite interesting. And in my opinion, although quite repetive, Redwall series by Brian Jacques is quite good.
I have a strong dislike of Harry Potter, No offence to the fans. I have no interest in magical stuff and what not.
Dan Brown's Deception Point Is pretty good, although i haven't read DaVinci code yet.
EtherealDesert
Omg. The nasty snob roars now:

Borges, Calvino, Pyncho, DeLillo, Donne, Dostojevskij, Goethe, Eco, Dickens, Dante, Wordsworth (for now)
Olivia Wood
Joseph Heller - Catch-22 (which you must read), God Knows

Stanislaw Lem (Yay, Derleth!) - He's a classic Polish scifi writer, he wrote the Pilot Pirx series, Solaris, uh... a whole bunch of short stories, etc. http://www.lem.pl/

Robert Cormier - The Chocolate War, I am the Cheese, Fade - some of his work can get a bit cheesy in a surreal, melodramatic kind of way (which I find funny Wink ), and he isn't the most diverse of writers, but he's still pretty entertaining. I especially liked his Tenderness.

Douglas Adams - The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series, but I actually liked Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency more.
splitunion
In my personal opinion, Celeste De Blasis is amoung the best authors of her time. She wrote the Wild Swan triology which includes Wild Swan, Swan's Chance, and Season of Swans. The storyline does not revolve around swans, but the titles do fit into the story. She's a high quality writer whose work is loved by young and old alike.
HimuraKiyone
LeviticusMky wrote:
Neil Gaiman - A modern fantasy writer, his novels are so real that it doesn't feel like fantasy. He writes mosly modern day, but he's got a couple of books out that are more ancient-setting novels. If you want a great weekend read, get "American Gods"


Definitely. Yes. I was going recommend him. He is a very realistic fantasy writer. He also writes graphic novels like Sandman.
Bookface
In no particular order, but grouped by authors I consider somewhat similar:

Nonfictional: Douglas Hofstadter, Bill Bryson,

Epic stories: James Clavell*, John Steinbeck, Ernest Hemmingway, Victor Hugo, JRR Tolkien, Theodore/Fyodor Dostoevsky,

Human stories (non-epics): Nick Horby, Herman Hesse,

Satire/Social Commentary: Joseph Heller, Kurt Vonnegut, George Orwell, Adolus Huxley,
Parody: Douglas Adams, Terry Pratchett,

Brilliant & Surreal (SciFi/Fantasy): Orson Scott Card, Philip K Dick, Frank Herbert, Neil Gaiman, Neil Stephenson, Chuck Palahniuk, Franz Kafka, Philip Pullman,

* Sad the OP spelled it wrong... and it's the first author he mentioned, too**
** I feel I probably spelled someone's name wrong too, there's too many to keep track of
aerialdreams
Mercedes Lackey-all her books

Dawn Cook - all her books

Robert Jordan - Wheel of Time series

Charlotte Bronte - Jane Eyre

Sarah Zettle-In Camelot's Shadow

Rachel Lee - Shadows of Myth

Anne McCaffrey - Her Dragon books.

Deborah Hale - The Wizard's Ward
The Destined Queen

P.C. Cast - Elphame's Choice

JRR Tolkien - The Lord of the Rings Series

C.S. Lewis - The Chronicles of Narnia

Tim LaHaye - The Left Behind Series

~~~~
You can just see that I love fiction stories, especially fantasy ^_^
garvalf4
Jose Philip Farmer, Michael Moorcock, Philip K Dick, R. Zelazny delivered interesting sagas. I like most of their books, especially Amber's Chronicles and the sago of Corum
bsimpsn05
I see some of you are into the same stuff as me.

I'm a big fan of:

Kurt Vonnegut - First author I really got into. His style of blending science fiction and events from his own life really interests me

Ray Bradbury - Fahrenheit 451 was just an amazing book, and I fear its predictions aren't too far off with all the emphasis on being politically correct these days.

Hunter S. Thompson - Amazing journalist, amazing author... Although his best work was in his earlier years... you can tell all the drugs got to him

Chuck Palahniuk (sp?) - Very entertaining author

Richard Write - I read Native Son in one sitting because I just couldnt put it down.

JD Salinger - The Catcher in the Rye is a book you either love or hate, and I love it.

CS Lewis - My mom read The Lion, The Witch, And the Wardrobe to me when I was little... hehe
wetair
In no order, my fav writers:

Anne Bishop - her dark jewel series.

Jim Butcher - all his books

Laurell Hamilton - all except for the last couple of the anita books

The Southern Vampire series with Sookie Stackhouse.

Mercedes Lackey - nearly everything.

Anne Mc______ - wrote the Pern Series and lots more. can't remember her last name.
ladiesroompodcast
Toni Morrison for the wisdom and lyricism (Beloved is my favorite, Love and Sula fairly close behind)

Gabriel Garcia Marquez for Love in the Time of Cholera (which made me weep) and the incredible storytelling of Chronicle of a Death Foretold.

I really loved Flaubert's Madame Bovary, Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby and The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy
lyndonray
my favourite author would definately have to be the master of the spy thriller genre: Robert Ludlum. My favourite of his books is the matarese cirlcle. Next would have to be sydney sheldon. Each of his books, whether it is some poor soul with multiple personality disorder, or an overwhelmed embassador in communist europe, is enthralling and entertaining. If you haven't checked out these two authors, do that. They're great
Masochistic Tendencies
Lee Child -Reacher series

Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman.- DragonLance

Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child- Still life with crows
aalmighty
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle - The Sherlock Holmes Series, Tales of terror and mystery

Douglas Adams - The Hitchhiker's guide to the galaxy

Somerset Maugham's short stories

Mario Puzo - The Godfather

Satyajit Ray for his short stories

HG Wells

And the latest

Jane Jensen for Dante's equation, Kickass book! better than the Dan Browns anytime!

Edit : Somehow forgot PG Wodehouse! Who can forget the Inimitable Jeeves!
deviant
Dan Brown
John Grisham
CS Lewis
~tang~
George MacDonald Fraser - Writer of the Flashman series. He's the best historical novellist ever... so witty and ingenuitive

Lian Hearn - The Tales of the Otori. A great Australian writer on Japanese culture. His only shortcoming is being too concise.

Phillip Pullman - His Dark Materials Trilogy is my favourite series of all time. It's the most intelligent and creative collective piece I've ever read, and I recommend it to everyone
hanay
Timothy Zahn
Bookface
~tang~: I've never heard of Fraser or Hearn, but they both sound fascinating and have been added to my to-read list.

Meanwhile, I've been enjoying Malcolm Gladwell and Neil Gaiman lately. Just thought I'd mention.
please.be.quiet
brent runyon (the burn journals). jerry spinelli (stargirl). laurie halse anderson (speak). stephen chbosky (the perks of being a wallflower). naomi shihab nye (habibi)
tsukiyuuki
I have a fairly long list, since I spend what is probably too much time reading and not enough time actually, you know, in communication with real people. ^^; List is in no particular order of preference...

Orson Scott Card, JRR Tolkien (his names just looks odd with actual punctuation between his first three initials ^^;; ), James Clavell, Tamora Pierce, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Dante Aligheri, Charles Dickens, Takashi Matsuoka, William Shakespeare (okay, so he's a semi-author), Rudyard Kipling, C.S. Lewis, Arthur Golden, Truman Capote, J.K. Rowling, Murasaki Shikibu (yay world's first real novelist being female!), Diane Wynne-Jones, Oscar Wilde, Dr. Seuss, and Neil Gaiman are all I can come up with at this point.

If I thought people were interested in hearing about my favourite poets, I'd list them too, but I don't imagine anyone cares... especially as that list is even longer...
Shewolf
Here are some of my favourite authors:

Maria Gripe: she mixes fantasy and "reality" in a wonderful way. You always end up with a feeling of not knowing what's "real or not.

J.R.R.Tolkien: His amazing world of Eä, it has captured me. I guess my heart will stay there forever Wink Can't wait for Narn Hin Húrin to be released.

Neil Gaiman: Even though I have just read American Gods I love his style of writing "modern fantasy".

Jostein Gaarder: The author of Maya, one of the most confusig books I have ever read.

Virgina Wolf: Long time since I read any of her work, but Orlando for instance is great.

Philip Pullman: His Dark Materials was the first fantasy triology I did read in English, and then I continiued with The Broken Bridge which is great too.

Michael Ende: He wrote Momo, Never Ending Story etc and makes up much of my childhood dreamy queendom.

Khaled Hossein: For The Kite Runner, which is one of the most beatiful novels I have read lately.

Anne McCaffery: Her wonderful books of Pern, and it's people.
tsukiyuuki
Oh my GOD, The Kite Runner was such an amazing book!! I cried SO many times while reading that - it was so fantastic. The ending really surprised me, but it was beautiful.

I don't read very many books written in the first person because it's so hard to do properly, but Hossein is an amazing writer. I'm going to keep watching for anything else they may publish.

I really loved Gaiman's American Gods as well. I fangirl far too many authors for my own good, really. ^^;;
TurtleShell
tsukiyuuki wrote:
Oh my GOD, The Kite Runner was such an amazing book!! I cried SO many times while reading that - it was so fantastic. The ending really surprised me, but it was beautiful.

I don't read very many books written in the first person because it's so hard to do properly, but Hossein is an amazing writer. I'm going to keep watching for anything else they may publish.

I really loved Gaiman's American Gods as well. I fangirl far too many authors for my own good, really. ^^;;


I loved American Gods too! In fact, it is one of the reasons Neil Gaiman would be one of my favorites. my roommate has Kite Runner but I haven't read it yet. Maybe soon!

Other favorite authors: Charles Dickens, Michael Chabon. Oh, and David Foster Wallace. I think the Infinite Jest is probably the strangest, coolest, most rewarding book I've ever read.
tsukiyuuki
I would absolutely, definitely recommend reading [i]The Kite Runner[i]! For me, it was one of those books that I could not put down - which sucked, because I started reading it when I was at work. I worked at a call centre at the time. XD
catscratches
Terry Goodkind The Sword of Truth
David Eddings Sagan om Belgarion, Sagan om Belgarath, Sagan om Mallorea, Sagan om Tamuli don't know what they're called in english.

It's fantasy books.

I also recently read Mark Haddon's book about a strange boy who was mentaly sick or something...good, but hard to read.
tsukiyuuki
catscratches wrote:
David Eddings Sagan om Belgarion, Sagan om Belgarath, Sagan om Mallorea, Sagan om Tamuli don't know what they're called in english.


My roommate has those, and I keep meaning to read them, but I haven't got around to it yet. Are they very good?
ganesh
Undoubtedly, P G Wodehouse (hailed as the funniest writers of all times!).

James Herriot, for the warmth with which he narrates his stories.

Michael Crichton is OK, for the research he puts into his novels (but language wise, I wouldn't say he is that great!)
ddukki
iblislux wrote:
Umberto Eco
I don't really have to introduce this author. The thing I dislike about him is his perfectionism. He gives too much irrelevant details. But the following book I liked very much: his dabble at fantasy.
    Baudolino
I read his Name of the Rose and I have to admit; as long as it was, I couldn't stop reading. One of the best books I've read. It may be because I loved Sherlock Holmes, and this was close to it, but it was good reading, regardless.
dukieboy
For me its got to be Neil Gaiman and Jack Kerouac. Both are really great writers. Started into Gaiman when he first wrote the sandman series, and then he made American Gods. That was a cool fictional novel! Jack as many of you know is the icon of the beat generation, his "On The Road" book is an adventure ride, roadie style!
Crazy_Canuck
tsukiyuuki wrote:
I would absolutely, definitely recommend reading The Kite Runner[i]! For me, it was one of those books that I could not put down - which sucked, because I started reading it when I was at work. I worked at a call centre at the time. XD


Have you read the next of Khaled Hosseini's, tsuki? Called [i]A Thousand Splendid Suns.

Supposed to be even better.

For my list, I'll put Dickens, Margaret Atwood, Vonnegut. Entire body of work in each of these three is substantial and important.

I like other individual books, but these are the authors that i return to over and over again.
tsukiyuuki
Crazy_Canuck wrote:

Have you read the next of Khaled Hosseini's, tsuki? Called A Thousand Splendid Suns.

Supposed to be even better.


I haven't read it, but now I need to! I didn't know Hosseini had another book out! I get so woefully behind on new book releases when I'm at school and not reading The Globe and Mail every weekend, haha.

Thanks, I'll definitely look for it after classes end! (Too many papers and exams coming up right now to do much non-class reading. : ( )
TurtleShell
michael chabon, charles dickens, Robert munsch, margaret george, THWhite...
MaxStirner
I have always found it difficult to answer questions requesting a "best of" list, since so many choices have a very personal background, not necessarily equated with the (more or less objective) quality of the work. All the simpler it is to supply a "favorites" list (any prejudices in favor of playwrights vs. novelists can be placed squarely on my shoulders):

  1. Raymond Chandler: If I had to reduce my explanation of why Mr. Chandler is on (or to be more exact: at the top of) this list, then it would be: >dialogue<. Had I to choose one author who's novels I would be allowed to take with me to the proverbial deserted island, Raymond Chandler would always be my first pick. I could of course choose Joyce's "Ulysses" but then your attempt at rescue would find me hanging from the nearest palm tree.
  2. Tennessee Williams: Apart from the fact that, as a playwright, he has a head-start on an of my lists, the shear amount of quality work, makes it impossible not to include him. What makes him not stand out in this list is, through my fault not his, the fact that he has earned his place not by any subjective assesment on my part but rather by the quality of his plays. "The Glass Menagerie", "A Streetcar Named Desire", "Cat on a Hot tin Roof", "Suddenly, Last Summer", "The Night of the Iguana", ... probably make him the most worthy member of this list since he has earned it simply by what he has written and not what I have interpreted into his work or life.
  3. Kurt Tucholsky: To be exact, Mr. Tucholky was a journalist rather than a novelist and, regrettably, has not been well translated into English (with notable exceptions). As someone clearly heard in the 20ies and 30ies in the "Weimarer" Republic, he had as few others, been a voice of reason during the prequel of the German dark ages of the 20th century.
  4. Berthold Brecht: Although politically Mr. Brecht was diametrically opposed to any of my convictions (my wife liked to remark that, politically, I could be filed somewhere to the right of Ghengis Khan), he was the one playwright / author representing a humane (even if utopic) socialist / Marxist society in the pre-WW II Germany.
  5. Stefan Zweig: Zweig is perhaps THE German author of the 20th century, portraying all the dreams, hopes and wishes of the 20ies and early 30ies which were shattered by national socialism, and it seems significant that he was not even awarded the satisfaction of seeing this experiment in terror crumble.
  6. Oscar Wilde: Hollywood has often been critizised, and very probably rightly so, as placing entertainment and distraction above any meaningful content. The best productions, though, seem to prove this statement wrong: It is the packaging of values and content within a popular theme that is able to address audiences usually unreachable by any other means. Mr. Wilde would have felt at home there, although he too would not have gotten along with Louis B. Mayer.
  7. Lillian Hellman: On a very round-about way, we are back in the "detective fiction" corner. In the late 70ies, I went to see a film named "Julia", most probably because I was a fan of both Jason Robards and Vanessa Redgrave, and was intrigued enough by the story to look up the author who turned out to be Lillian Hellman (with her novella named "Pentimento"). This alone would not have left a mark, had I not discovered her lasting relationship with Dashiell Hammett and her stand against the House Un-American Activities Committee in the early 50ies. That, reading her autobiography "An Unfinished Woman" plus of course her plays which I had to backtrack to find, puts her squarely on my favorites list.
  8. Pablo Neruda: Growing up in that corner of the world (Latin America), there is no getting around Pablo Neruda, especially if one has an inkling of the soul and history of the region.
  9. Stephen King: It is a bit regrettable that, simply through this author's choice of subject-matter, he apparently is disqualified being though of as a serious artist but rather as a popular bestselling author. Although this is certainly my very subjective opinion. it seems he is able to reproduce so accurately all the fears, desires and inadequacies, of the baby-boomer generation (to which I count myself).
  10. Ayn Rand: As a social libertarian, I most probably have a similar background to so many others who embraced objectivism in their early years. Although age and experience has perhaps mellowed many of the convictions of my youth, any regard I may have for the rights on the individual can be traced back to Dagny Taggart and Howard Roark.
  11. John le Carré: In a world which so many so eagerly persist in painting in black and white, Mr. le Carré is the master of shades of gray.
  12. Gabriel Garcia Marquez: (see also "Pablo Neruda" above) What "Faust" is to the German language or perhaps "Moby Dick" to English, that is "Don Quijote de la Mancha" to all Spanish speaking countries/societies. I vividly recall spending two semesters in junior high reading this book as part of our Spanish literature class. Had "One Hundred Years of Solitude" not been written, "Don Quijote" would probably still be on this list, but Marquez has simply swept it away.

Max (hoping this post will not be considered flooding)

PS: Waiting in the aisles are Kurt Vonnegut, Ray Bradbury, Stefan Heim, Isaac Asimov, Maxim Gorky, Stephan Handtke, Victor Hugo, Charles Dickens, ... and so many others.
catscratches
tsukiyuuki wrote:
catscratches wrote:
David Eddings Sagan om Belgarion, Sagan om Belgarath, Sagan om Mallorea, Sagan om Tamuli don't know what they're called in english.


My roommate has those, and I keep meaning to read them, but I haven't got around to it yet. Are they very good?
Sorry for the really late answer but I didn't notice that you had replied to my post.

Well... if they weren't any good, I wouldn't have said he was one of my favourite author, would I? Razz
tsukiyuuki
catscratches wrote:
tsukiyuuki wrote:
catscratches wrote:
David Eddings Sagan om Belgarion, Sagan om Belgarath, Sagan om Mallorea, Sagan om Tamuli don't know what they're called in english.


My roommate has those, and I keep meaning to read them, but I haven't got around to it yet. Are they very good?
Sorry for the really late answer but I didn't notice that you had replied to my post.

Well... if they weren't any good, I wouldn't have said he was one of my favourite author, would I? Razz


I suppose that's true, haha. That's an example of me submitting before I really think about what I'm saying. XD Sorry, I'm a little stunned sometimes. ^^;;
Bluedoll
I will pick one author at a time, this time it is Ernest Hemingway.

Why?

Perhaps, he said it best himself as he was good at reading people. Looking into a person, seeing them and then writing about all he saw. Yes, he was very good at that. What I notice however is that not everyone relates to Hemingway. All he says is under what he writes. To explain the best I can do is quote him loosely.

In one of his shorts he wrote, he expressed how one of his characters that appeared in the short story would write poems but he would write many poems and write them quickly. His portral of this character was not a mirror image of himself. This was not the writing style of Hemingway. He wrote best perhaps on a lake or a trail or in contemplation when he didn't use pen or type. Later, after much thinking on life and life experiences all his stories came out onto the paper and he had many of them.

That is what I liked about Ernest Hemingway.
supernova1987a
Carl Sagan: On Science and Astronomy
Read the Cosmos book
JessieF
Robert Jordan - The Wheel of Time I enjoy long and complex plot lines, and the series has very well developed characters. They're not just "black and white." Also there is a lot of humor in this series that I get and I always end up laughing! =]

Jennifer Fallon - The Hythrun Chronicles, The Second Sons Trilogy, The Tide Lords Quartet
chartcentral
D.J. MacHale: The Pendragon series and the Morpheus Road series
Jenny Nimmo: Children of the Red King (Charlie Bone) series
Rick Warren: The Purpose-Driven Life
deanhills
ganesh wrote:
Undoubtedly, P G Wodehouse (hailed as the funniest writers of all times!).
Completely agreed. Wow! Just reminds me, I should start reading my collection again. Probably one of the best medicines, as inevitably I just about shake with laughter every time .... good stuff.

I also struggelled through James Michener, which I enjoyed. All of his books I always struggled to get into, but once on the go, they were really great novels. All of Ayn Rand's books etc. etc.

I like crime thrillers:

Henning Mankell
Benjamin Black
Nelson DeMille
Robert Parker
James Patterson
Sidney Sheldon
Jonathan Kellermann
Faye Kellermann
Kathy Reichs
Shiny
Stephenie Meyer - I adore her writing style, it is very light and compelling at the same time. When I read her books I cannot help but forget about the real world and get totally absorbed in the characters' feelings.

Alexey Pehov - Russian fantasy author and probably one of the best out there. I think the only book that has been translated into English so far is "The Chronicles of Siala".

Franz Kafka - "Metamorphosis" is my favorite book by Kafka. I'm not sure what genre it actually belongs to, but to me it is a perfect sample of psychological thriller.

Fyodor Dostoevsky - I have no idea why I like this guy, but for some reason when my high school friends where socializing in the evenings, I was reading Dostoevsky's "The Idiot" and "Crime and Punishment".
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