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Why trees live longer?





sarapicoazul
Can you give an explanation to why trees live longer?
Keran
Live longer then what?
...
If longer then humans then i guess mostly cuz they are plants and have completelly different structure then humans...
heh.. hehe ;p
gh0stface
Ideally, trees are the perfect machines. They have the ability to create and process there own food. They do not have to rely on foraging for other food sources. All they need is water, sun, and nutrients from the soil.

The only reason that trees eventually die off if they are not harmed by animals, mother nature, or human construction is that as trees grow taller and thicker, it makes getting food go where they need to be a lot more difficult. Gravity starts to work against them. At least something like that. It's been a while since I've had to do anything with plant biology.
ocalhoun
They do eventually get old and die, but it takes a long time; most trees don't live that long. When they do die, they do so just like humans; they get various diseases and die from them. (For a tree, fungus and bugs would qualify as diseases). The reason they live so long is that they have a slower metabolism. They do everything very slowly, including aging.

The life expectancy of trees is different for every species; a 200 year old oak could be considered relatively young, while a cherry loral (spelling?) grows much faster, but dies much sooner.
Panthrowzay
Ive never seen a tree age, like a animal, they are usally killed.
I think the metoblism has some thing to do with it, with the added effect of the way that they make food.

some of the oldest living life forms are sugar makers (plant-like)
osbits
The answear is gene.
drdestiny
trees live a long time because of their more effecent cell structure, easy food supply, and lack of essential organs.

see, unlike animals, trees dont have livers, or stomachs or brains, that if one is disfunctional, the creature is dead. however, trees have many roots, and many leaves, and many branches so they are way less fragile
spanx
tree lives more than humans
because they dont have nervous system coordinating their body
their whole body works independently
and the thing is that they can cope with the regular change in environment
QrafTee
sarapicoazul wrote:
Can you give an explanation to why trees live longer?

Better yet, why do fruit flies live shorter? It's just how it is, stop asking to many questions or you'll die faster... than a tree... than an average human...
Montressor
QrafTee wrote:
Better yet, why do fruit flies live shorter? It's just how it is, stop asking to many questions or you'll die faster... than a tree... than an average human...

Technically speaking (all other variables excluded) he'll live longer than you since his inquisitive nature is less stressful on his nervous and immune systems than your apparent nature...
Just a thought

As far as aging, one of the theorized causes of aging is concerned with cell growth (not necessarily metabolism). Each time a cell reproduces, the telomere (a repeating sequence of non-coding DNA at both ends of the strand) is cut slightly shorter due to the actual physical process of DNA replication. Once the strand has been replicated enough times the telomeres are depleted and the actual coding sequence of the DNA is cut shorter making the DNA incomplete, and rendering the new cell a mutant (to say in the least), if not dead. It is believed that aging is at least partially due to this process, because once you get old you start to have fewer and fewer cells that can actually replicate themselves and when your current cells die off, nothing can replace them...
Since trees have a relatively slow growth rate, and a slower death rate of the cells they have than we, this theoretical effect is greatly reduced. As noted the trees that grow faster, as well as the diseased trees tend to die younger, because the faster growing trees squandered their replications and the diseased lost their replicating cells
see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telomeres for more details on telomeres
bluefossil
can you explain why we live shorter?
dooble.doodles
I planted a couple trees in the back garden and neither of them made it beyond 14 years. One was killed by boarers... just like the animals killing the young. The other was likely a poor choice on my part. I learned later that the tree I picked had a short life span.

One of the posts above said it best... its in the genes. Its not that trees live exceptionally long... not all types do live longer the life expectancy for humans. But many do.

What is more interesting... is what about things make life span longer or shorter. Is it related to size? Environment? Other factors?
ralphbefree
metabolisim

why do sea turtles live so long? why do parrots live so long? why do fruit flys live so short?

some trees live longer than other trees. i think that this is based on metabolism. all life takes a slightly different aproach to survival but it is all based on birth, growth, reproduction, death.

so i suppose it comes down to the fact that some organisms are quicker f**kers than others hehehhe
crimson tempest
It's because they drink they drink their ovaltine. But seriously its because their are less diseases to affect their health, and their lifesource is the earth, so they will die once the Earth dies. lol Rolling Eyes
Sikon
If one looks at different types of life, one can see some trends. Bacteria are "immortal," not having any particular maximum lifespan (though of course many of them get killed all of the time from different causes other than aging). From insects to dogs, most animals live less long than humans, though there are some exceptions. The very longest lived species tend to be continuously growing, suggesting that the process of continuous growth even in "old age" may help renew them. Speaking of another factor, the right kind of reduced calorie diet causes much lifespan extension in studies on rats (see here).

Indeed, in general, less active species are particularly likely to have long lifespans, such as turtles that can live for centuries. Still, that is clearly not the only factor. Some think there are seven causes of human aging as listed here, described as "the set of accumulated side effects from metabolism that eventually kills." The subject is quite complicated, and subject to some research as better knowledge could be relevant to developing treatments for life extension in humans; medically, it would be ideal if people could avoid ending up nursing homes as often in their 60s, 70s, and 80s but rather someday be a little more like one other mammal: Balaena mysticetus, the bowhead whale, which has a 210-year maximum lifespan despite being relatively active (reference). Other animals living exceptionally long include urchins and rockfish, though those are far simpler than mammals.

Trees are relatively simple organisms with a relatively slow metabolism probably helping limit the rate of damage over the years, also continuously growing, so, as the preceding suggests, those may be part of the factors involved. I see a couple of posts by others in this thread already implied part of what I have said here.

dooble.doodles wrote:
What is more interesting... is what about things make life span longer or shorter. Is it related to size? Environment? Other factors?

You might find the article titled Some Animals Age, Others May Not: What Nature Tells Us About Aging here to be of interest, as the author compares quite a number of species.
seaking
hmmm.. well its because of the biochemistry.. the electron transport chain in animals doesnt have AOX protein (alternative oxidase)..plants use an alternative respiratory pathway involving this Aox.. this leads to lot of cycles and branches in the bichemical cycle that differs from animals.. there is a deeper study on this cycle.. if you are interested in the technical details, then drop a mail in rsurya786@gmail.com .. have fun.. Smile
Ankhanu
Montressor is probably the closest so far, with cell reproduction rates, telomere reduction and the like... though some trees do have exceptional growth rates as well (even some of the longer lived species). Part of it has to do with their life-history traits and metabolism, and the differing life strategies employed by animals versus those employed by plants (as mentioned, there are some very long lived bacteria, also fungi and monerans).
Let's stick with longer lived species, and ignore the fast growing more ephemeral trees.
Many trees (plants really) produce far more food than they need to metabolize to live; this lets them allocate some of this energy into building and maintaining body structure. They allocate more resources into repairing and maintaining tissue than they allocate to growing larger or reproducing. Animals, on the other hand, spend more energy for basic metabilism than they allocate for tissue maintenance and animal cells are more fragile than plant cells. Also more of the animal body is composed of actively living cells. While cell turnover contributes to telomere loss at a rapid rate in animal cells (the telomere cannot be rebuilt, except by a couple cells, ie. germ line cells and cancerous cells), add that to higher metabolism and less efficient methods of acquiring nutrients, and you can expect a shortened lifespan.

Also, very little of a tree is actually living tissue. The roots, leaves and the thin layer of cambium between the bark and wood are the only refuges of living cells. Wood is, by and large dead. It's used in the passive transport of water and sugars, but is just dead structure.


Don't for a second believe that trees don't have many diseases to attack them; they have a multitude and are pretty constantly under attack by various bacteria, fungi, animals, etc. They also suffer from the same sorts of genetic and cancerous issues other complex organisms do. Just because they don't cough doesn't mean they're not ill. Though, as someone mentioned, their non-centralized anatomies generally mean that many diseases are localized and the tree can continue functioning (though hindered).
Gagnar The Unruly
I think that xylem tension problems can also lead to death/weakening in large old trees. A colleague of mine has evidence that pines die when they get too large, and that there is a tradeoff in fast growth vs. long lifetimes (with genetic variation to match).

Also (Ankhanu I'm sure you know this), comparing plant cell reproduction to animal cell reproduction is like comparing apples and oranges. As animal embryos develop, each cell among the hundreds of cells in the embryo has a specific fate (some cells become the liver, others the nose, etc.). Turning the embryo into a fetus, and a fetus into an adult organism, only takes a relative handful of divisions of each of those cells. Each cell in a full grown animal is only dozens of cell divisions away from the original zygote (except in certain tissues with really high or low rates of cell turnover). Repeated cell divisions increases the chance of DNA damage, and tumors and other disease can result. Many scientists think that accumulated DNA damage is what weakens us as we age.

For plants, it's totally different. Plants grow from meristems. The cells that get made stick around without ever reproducing again. Instead, a line of cells at the end of a growing shoot (or in a cylinder around the outside of the wood of a tree), divides to produce the new cells. The new cells at the end of the shoot become the new meristem, and make more cells. The new cells at the bottom of the meristem stay there and develop into the new tissue. The meristem is like a moving front of growth, constantly making new cells that become the new meristem. But away from the meristem in the mature part of the plant there's no cell division. That means that the cells at the end of the growing end of a large tree could be trillions of generations old, as opposed to dozens or hundreds for many types of animal cells. Somehow, plants seem to avoid problems with DNA damage. It's a bit of a mystery.

Like Ankhanu says, I bet most of it has to do with simple physiology, both at the cell level and the organism level, but it's hard to understand unless you know more about how trees and animals work.
liljp617
QrafTee wrote:
sarapicoazul wrote:
Can you give an explanation to why trees live longer?

Better yet, why do fruit flies live shorter? It's just how it is, stop asking to many questions or you'll die faster... than a tree... than an average human...


Well that's a pretty goofy outlook. What's the purpose of having a functioning brain if you don't ask questions and attempt to reason answers?
fx-trading-education
I think that human life is shorter than for the trees because the humans have brain and several organs (heart being often the most problematic one) that malfunction with age.
If a human would be composed only of flesh and bones without the organs inside (a bit smilar to a tree) then he would live longer but life wouldn't be very interesting, isn't it?
Ankhanu
Plants have organs... they're just not the same organs that animals have.
ocalhoun
Ankhanu wrote:
Plants have organs... they're just not the same organs that animals have.

Not in the same way that animals have either, as evidenced by some plants' ability to grow an entire new plant from just a tiny cutting of the original plant.
Gagnar The Unruly
Some animals can do that too.
jmaninc68
a tree has a completley different body structure than a human so you cannot compare the two age differences....200 years to a tree might be equivalent to 70 years of a human
chasbeen
I'm not sure how the average lifespan of trees compares with the average life of humans. Trees appear to be a more diversified category compared to the human species. I had a friend in England who I hear is still alive and he's 106 and apparantly completely "compes mentis", I think his wife departed only a few years ago. There combined ages are (were) well over 200.
chatrack
This a best example, by living ecofriendy one can live long
Gagnar The Unruly
chasbeen wrote:
I'm not sure how the average lifespan of trees compares with the average life of humans. Trees appear to be a more diversified category compared to the human species. I had a friend in England who I hear is still alive and he's 106 and apparantly completely "compes mentis", I think his wife departed only a few years ago. There combined ages are (were) well over 200.


Trees vary. Some fast growing trees like birches live less than a century in the wild because they can't compete with larger, stronger, slower trees like maples. In people's yards they may only live a few decades because they tend to get sick and weak as they get old. This is a problem for aspens, too. You may notice that aspens in peoples yards tend not to live very long before succumbing to pests and diseases. However, aspens are among the worlds oldest complex organisms, because they maintain colonies vegetatively through roots (a stand of aspens is actually a single organism). Aspen colonies may be thousands of years old. Single trees can also be quite old. Many forest trees live hundreds of years, and some live thousands of years (typically trees growing in really harsh environments). It's hard to say what kills trees in nature. They may succumb to disease, fire, pests, or competition from other trees before dying 'naturally,' but I think some trees do simply die of old age. That could take a long time (500-1000 years ?), though, even for run-of-the-mill trees.
knight_frost
in humans, life is determine is to how long can we sustain cell division.. our life status starts to deteriorate when cell division stop.. maybe in trees, cell division happens longer and slower than to us.. what do you think?
reiika101
Probably because they can adapt to lots of climates, that's why they live longer.
Chinmoy
trees live longer because they have free supply of food, have no organ system and have no need for locomotion which is a really energy hungry process. Their metabolism is much simpler than higher level organisms and above all they have a regenerative power..
speeDemon
Ohh i know the answer!!!!!!!!

don't read any other, thats right, none of the other replies!!!

herez the answer:

Becase they dont have marriage!!!

Laughing Laughing
barmstonian
Keran wrote:
Live longer then what?

The universe...
... which was, according to biblical scholars, created in 4004 BC. The oldest tree found to date (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/04/080414-oldest-tree.html) began growing around 7,500BC.

Maybe that means god is a christmas tree?
yagnyavalkya
Quote:
Through simulations of the bit string model for biological aging, we reproduced the observed feature of trees and some species of fish of high maximum lifespans if fertility increases with age. Our results provide an additional evidence for the importance of the mutation accumulation theory from biological aging. This paper can give a few insights

Why trees live longer?

Authors: de Menezes M.A.1; Racco A.; Penna T.J.P.

Source: Physica A, Volume 233, Number 1, 15 November 1996 , pp. 221-225(5)

Publisher: Elsevier

Tell me if you need the above paper
Honolulu
Tree does live longer than human becoz they do not need to go to work Razz
izibash
Trees are chilling whole day long
No stress at all, their biggest problem is when a kid wants to make a treehouse. They are used to boredomm so they dont die of it.
They dont have to go to work
They dont have to go to school
They dont have to search food because its almost always there when they need it

There are my visions
yagnyavalkya
Hey guys
does that mean that doing work makes you live less
I guess you are wrong
Have you ever thought what kind of work the trees do
Have you heard of the red wood tree that can take water from the soil deep below and transport it to the top of its canopy
The trees are stationary and have no mobility and yet they resist every invasion from ant to viruses and still live they don't go doctors for flu and cold and yet they live long
Please try and be a little scientific and logical in your posts
izibash
yagnyavalkya wrote:
Hey guys
does that mean that doing work makes you live less
I guess you are wrong
Have you ever thought what kind of work the trees do
Have you heard of the red wood tree that can take water from the soil deep below and transport it to the top of its canopy
The trees are stationary and have no mobility and yet they resist every invasion from ant to viruses and still live they don't go doctors for flu and cold and yet they live long
Please try and be a little scientific and logical in your posts


Uhm how is this
Trees dont have stress, they have no brain.
They dont have a heart whichs have to beat every sec.
Sometimes moving something weakens it
And humans are also immune for many viruses. For example the flu
When Columbus went to South America he and his seaman took the flu with them without knowing. The Hispanics were immune for it but many many Indians died. (I dont know how many but I believe over 1 million or over 100k)
and dont forget, some trees dont live longer than humans
spring567
Because tree is not animal . Tree is simple .
phuchicu
a difficult question. I think it is difficult to answer. you can answer by analyzing the people in question. but it can not completely recreate the good reasons. have many things for which we are still mysteries. a tree can live longer than a human. because it can not have life like us. you say about life by yourself. always busy and many things to enjoy. must always work with often several hours a day . . the human body are limited by bear. perhaps so that we risk to meet life and often less. vice versa. when a tree was born and raised all the same places. life is always just fixed. always repeat the cycle. the activities of conservation and it is not as complex human beings. ^ ^. the humor that I talk about this issue can be. Trees do not work and survive as humans. because the no longer living
jabce85
it's just the way they evolved.. their whole cycle of life is completely different than other organisms in that it is much slower... for example, a human fully matures in roughly 20 years where as a tree fully matures in roughly 80-100+ years..
MiCKi
because tree support the world but human destroy !
hesho123
Through simulations of the bit string model for biological aging, we reproduced the observed feature of trees and some species of fish of high maximum lifespans if fertility increases with age. Our results provide an additional evidence for the importance of the mutation accumulation theory from biological aging
qtwaiter
because trees are not need to move! They only in one place!
yagnyavalkya
Trees live long because they have the genes that make them live longer and aging processes slow
Crinoid
Different speed (or time frame) of life. Compare one day living insects, mice, cats, elephants, turtles, trees (short and long lived), mountains.
pscompanies
Ideally, trees are the perfect machines. They have the ability to create and process there own food. They do not have to rely on foraging for other food sources. All they need is water, sun, and nutrients from the soil.

The only reason that trees eventually die off if they are not harmed by animals, mother nature, or human construction is that as trees grow taller and thicker, it makes getting food go where they need to be a lot more difficult. Gravity starts to work against them. At least something like that. It's been a while since I've had to do anything with plant biology.
kentchui
because They had no brain
mukesh
cant explain perfectly but i think tree structure is big. Tree roots coverage long area which always continues gets Vitamins and Minerals. So this process tree life is long. and i think tree body is so big then human body so this cause also tree life is longer Very Happy
baboosaa
when you look at a tree you can find that it has no specific part for a single function...I mean it does not have a single leaf for respiration. it has many leaves for respiration even it can respire form cuticle and small holes in the bark...and some even respire through their roots. But what's more interesting is that it can do it's food making process from various part of the body too. The only question is that which part makes more food and where is more chlorophyll..And then the magic begins... it starts to live in the environment...leaves may fall, branches may be cut but the tree has it's capability to make food necessary for it and this makes the tree live like a stone years and years or literally for ever.
ocalhoun
baboosaa wrote:
this makes the tree live like a stone years and years or literally for ever.


Well, no, not really.
In a world where trees have been around for millions of years, the oldest known trees are thousands of years old.

They do grow old, and they do deteriorate and/or catch diseases.
It takes some of them a lot longer than it does for us, but they're not immortal.


Come to think of it... Studying the aging process in plants might give some insight into how the aging process works in animals -- humans in particular.
(ie, just why do living things grow old and die?)
Would be a nice subject for a good biologist to dedicate a few decades of research into.
Ankhanu
baboosaa wrote:
when you look at a tree you can find that it has no specific part for a single function...

This isn't really true. Yes, they have replicates of things like leaves, but, leaves are specialized organs with specific functions... it's kinda like saying we live a long time because we have lots of alveolar sacs in our lungs, and not just one. They have tissue and organ systems just like animals do, they're just different.
Yes, many species can photosynthesize in more tissues than just the leaves, but, efficiency is almost as important as capability in maintaining life. A tree might survive a complete defoliation or two, living off of stored energy and secondary photosynthetic organs, but, they are not enough for repeated defoliation. Without their primary photosynthetic organs, the tree will decline and die... think of it like slowly starving to death. You can go a while without food, your body will even break down your fat reserves, then, when they're gone, will even metabilize its own proteins, but, without proper food intake, you will die. So it is for plants.

ocalhoun wrote:
Come to think of it... Studying the aging process in plants might give some insight into how the aging process works in animals -- humans in particular.
(ie, just why do living things grow old and die?)
Would be a nice subject for a good biologist to dedicate a few decades of research into.

Many have Wink
Aging in animals seems partially related to telomere deterioration; most animals cannot maintain/rebuild the telomeres at the end of the chromosomes that are lost during replication. As the telomere deteriorates, the animal's ability to maintain itself seems to follow (i.e cells that have divided many times seem to slow their division rates as time goes on). There are some animals that can rebuild or maintain telomeres, and some abnormalities (i.e. cancer cells) that will do so within an organism that normally can't. Aside from other complications, some of these animals can live for extremely long periods. There are myriad other causes of aging, including basic wear and tear of tissues, so it's not a simple story, but research has been conducted, and continues to be conducted into the topic. As out molecular understanding of biology grows, so to will our understanding of aging processes.
ocalhoun
barmstonian wrote:
Keran wrote:
Live longer then what?

The universe...
... which was, according to biblical scholars, created in 4004 BC. The oldest tree found to date (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/04/080414-oldest-tree.html) began growing around 7,500BC.

Bollux.

The invisible pink unicorn created the world last Thursday, complete with growth rings and people's memories already made.
jrzipagan03
trees can live longer if cared well by someone who own it, unlike acacia tree even they don't have owner they can live longer and stronger because of the good environment that fits on a acacia tree. Smile [/quote]
donoob88
trees are everlasting, as i heard in a man, trees cannot die unless of lighting strike, fire, lack of water, etc that can cause it to destroyed, us human will still die even we eat, drink, use medicinal drugs, etc.. trees cannot die if it gets enough water, sunlight, and no other harmful man-made or natural disaster.. Wink Wink Wink
Ankhanu
donoob88 wrote:
trees are everlasting, as i heard in a man, trees cannot die unless of lighting strike, fire, lack of water, etc that can cause it to destroyed, us human will still die even we eat, drink, use medicinal drugs, etc.. trees cannot die if it gets enough water, sunlight, and no other harmful man-made or natural disaster.. Wink Wink Wink

That man lied to you.
Trees have natural life spans that come to natural "old age" deaths. Different species of trees, just as different species of animals, die off naturally at different ages. The healthiest cherry tree under ideal conditions can't hope to live as long as a sugar maple, for example.
speeDemon
Philosophical answers anyone?
|Karma|
They do so much for everyone, so, they live longer too Razz
Bikerman
That isn't philosophy, it is religion, allbeit Buddhist. Such speculation belongs in either 'p&r' or 'faith'
busaboss
Maybe trees live longer because they are more adept in nature and they are physically stronger than normal people. Additionally, having someone to take care of a tree can increase its lifespan drastically. But for those trees in the wild, they may have a long life because of the nutrients they get around them.
ocalhoun
busaboss wrote:
Maybe trees live longer because they are more adept in nature and they are physically stronger than normal people

Horses are much stronger than 'normal people', but horses have significantly lower average lifespans.

No, lifespan is not proportional to strength.
Navigator
Trees live longer because they are worryless.
ocalhoun
Navigator wrote:
Trees live longer because they are worryless.

Butterflies are also worryless, but they don't live long at all.
TheLimey
they're made out of wood.....?
Ankhanu
TheLimey wrote:
they're made out of wood.....?

Wouldn't that just make them witches?? No, that's a silly reason!
alimddine
This is a very interesting question.
sanscha
First of all, trees have evolved in the plant kingdom multiple times. Many of them, like balsa and boxwood, are short-lived.

Trees have evolved to have different lifespans. As with everything in evolution, this goes back to reproduction. Some trees' strategy is to spend all their energy on reproduction as quickly as possible. Others' strategy is to slowly store energy and put reproduction off for a while, and then reproduce little by little. This leads to a long lifespan.
shoaib
I think trees live long than humans because they adjust accurately according to the ecosystem that's why their life is more than humans....
Ankhanu
shoaib wrote:
I think trees live long than humans because they adjust accurately according to the ecosystem that's why their life is more than humans....
What does this mean? Can you explain how a tree "adjusts accurately according to the ecosystem"? 'Cause, to me, that looks like you just strung some words together...
Gitesh
This may sound funny but my simple observation is that any living thing or machine which don't have movable parts lasts longer, has less maintenance, less wear tear., less requirements in the form of fuel and etc..

Now lets consider Tortoise vs Humans... Human beings have more moving parts against tortoise.,

Same way trees dont have any moving parts such as heart etc., obviously they can survive more.,
THere may be few variations to this observation but not many.
Bikerman
Err....I could go on to list several thousand plant species with no moving parts and lifespans of days or weeks.....
Brine shrimp don't have many moving parts but they live less than a year.

Now, I don't want to knock this too hard, because it isn't silly. Obviously things that move generate heat and will wear out sooner or later. Also things which move need energy. That energy is usually taken from burning oxygen - a very 'toxic' gas which produces lots of free radicals.

Still and all, I'm not sure it works as a general rule of thumb......
TheLimey
It is because they live off a healthy diet of water.... and dirt..
ocalhoun
TheLimey wrote:
It is because they live off a healthy diet of water.... and dirt..

So do annual plants.

Yet they only live (part of) one year, dying after they spread their seeds.
enilsoncba
I could simply say that it is because God wanted it that way .... but understand that the question is referenced biological explanation ... but usually the trees have a characteristic: they are slow growing trees. They are slow to grow because produce a high density wood, or a wooden tougher, more compact, it takes more time to be formed of a less dense wood and therefore less compact. This can take hundreds and thousands of years.
kndge9584
he must not be allowed to stretch out his hand and take also from the tree of life and eat, and live forever. 3:23 So the LORD God expelled him from the orchard in Eden to cultivate the ground from which he had been taken.
ocalhoun
kndge9584 wrote:
he must not be allowed to stretch out his hand and take also from the tree of life and eat, and live forever. 3:23 So the LORD God expelled him from the orchard in Eden to cultivate the ground from which he had been taken.

This made me literally facepalm.

It's doubly irrelevant, one for just pasting scripture in a science forum, two for saying nothing at all about the question: why trees live longer.

What did you do, just run a search for bible verses with the word 'tree' in them?
Bikerman
[MOD MODE]
This is a SCIENCE forum so unless there is some scientific point in bringing God into it, please desist or I will lock the thread.
Bikerman[/MOD]
Ankhanu
Davolutiion wrote:
because they dont get ill Very Happy

Funny... false Razz
setfirework
Trees can live long because of a special tissue called meristems., In plant anatomy, meristems are tissues composed of cells which are capable of growth and division in plant. The meristem is the reason why trees can grow indefinitely.
Ankhanu
But trees DON'T grow indefinitely... and because growth/expansion is primarily in the meristem tissues, older tissues decay and rot within the living tree, ultimately leading to death...

All plants have meristem, however, even the shortest lived species.
TheLimey
They're made out of wood Smile
renpei
Trees Live Longer because they are a highly efficient system.
They are autotrophs and make their own food so they do not go hungry.
They have highly specialized tissue and they dont have to do anything.
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