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Iranian-American Student Abused By UCLA UCPD With Tazer GUN





Jumpy
This is a incident that happen a couple weeks ago at UCLA.

I must warn you that the link i post is a video on youtube is not pleasant.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3GstYOIc0I

The story is that a student did not show his ID. And was asked to leave however as you can see from the video it got out of hand.

Personally i believe that using the TAser gun was misused in the first place whether or not that person was guilty. I'm even more appalled at the fact the police continued to taser the student over and over again because he did not stand up.
However, that is my emotional response to the video.

Whether i believe the student was wrong i have not decided because I'm not a police officer and perhaps the officers were following by protocol. Hopefully someone who is a police officer can tell us if these UCLA cops were justified in their action.

There are other video post response to the video but i would like what the frihhost community think the incident.
Who's Right or Wrong? What should be done now? Did the student do this to himself? or Did the police abused the student? What should be done from this happening again?

ThX
Bondings
This movie/topic has been covered a lot on social networking/news websites like digg and reddit. Quite a few people are very angry about what happened there.
shenyl
Power without self-control, and care for others, spells trouble.

There are many in this world, who abuse power in many and various forms.

Security forces, management, government - you can name them all.

The greatest power is the ability to govern one's own mind to do good and not for selfish benefits.

Yes, I am unhappy about this, it only remind me of others who had done more abuse of power, and some even tried to cover their evil actions to look really justified.
bond4154
Apparently, the UCLA's statement is that they support the action, and say that the security forces have acted in the best interests of the safety of the students.

Of course, I am not at all surprised that, of all the people in the library, it was the Iranian student that was asked to show his ID.

The fact that security forces tazered a student who showed no signs of hostility, nor carried any weapons, is a show that many people in America don't care much as to how they treat ethic minorities...especially an ethnic minority with origins from the Middle East.

Just so someone knows, the video was taken from a cell phone by another student there at the moment. The footage was broadcast, to no one's surprise, across the world. The cries of the student as he was tazered, however, was something horrendous to hear.
Moonspider
bond4154 wrote:
Apparently, the UCLA's statement is that they support the action, and say that the security forces have acted in the best interests of the safety of the students.

Of course, I am not at all surprised that, of all the people in the library, it was the Iranian student that was asked to show his ID.

The fact that security forces tazered a student who showed no signs of hostility, nor carried any weapons, is a show that many people in America don't care much as to how they treat ethic minorities...especially an ethnic minority with origins from the Middle East.

Just so someone knows, the video was taken from a cell phone by another student there at the moment. The footage was broadcast, to no one's surprise, across the world. The cries of the student as he was tazered, however, was something horrendous to hear.


According to the local news that I read, the student was asked to show his ID during a routine student ID check (he wasn't singled out), and then refused to leave the building when asked to do so.

I'm not saying that the use of force may not have been excessive (the investigation should answer that). However, from the security members' perspective, might it not have been the safest thing to do? They have a person refusing to show a student ID. Thus, they have no proof that he is a student and therefore they ask him to leave, which he refuses. They can't simply walk away because they have a responsibility to protect the student population and enforce the rules (I'm assuming that for safety reasons non-students are not allowed in the library. It is a school library, not a public one). If they remove him by physical force, they and the unidentified man face the chance of greater physical harm. The security members do not know his intent. All they know is that he appears to not be a student and he is refusing to leave university property.

Using a taser (or a disabling agent like pepper spray) disables a person to allow easier apprehension or in this case physical removal. If this person's intent was hostile (as may be interpreted by his refusal to obey the requests of security), physically attempting to remove him might have resulted in a brawl between the person and the security team. What other weapons were the security team carrying? I don't know, but if more than just a taser a physical altercation would not be desirable.

My only questions are, why didn't he show his ID and thus identify himself as a student? Why didn't he leave the building as requested?

Respectfully,
M
Bondings
I heard somewhere that there were 150 people killed due to tasers used by the police in the USA. I wouldn't call them innocent and use them for cases like this.

They also kept tasering him because he didn't want to stand up. Apparantly sometimes a taser has the effect that the victim isn't able to stand up anymore for up to 15 minutes.

And if someone doesn't want to leave a room, you can pull him away. You don't need to do anything else as long as he doesn't use any violence (which I think he didn't).

Quote:
My only questions are, why didn't he show his ID and thus identify himself as a student? Why didn't he leave the building as requested?

First of all, he was a student. Because he looks foreign, it might not be the first time that someone asks him his ID. And it can be very annoying if it is always you (and not the others) who has to show an ID, especially if it isn't the first time the same guards are asking it. Of course this isn't an excuse for not showing an ID, but it's easy to understand while being in an agry mood.
S3nd K3ys
Bondings wrote:
Because he looks foreign, it might not be the first time that someone asks him his ID. And it can be very annoying if it is always you


Sure beats getting :pwnt: with a taser over and over by power hungry cops, don't it? Laughing

Quote:
Of course this isn't an excuse for not showing an ID, but it's easy to understand while being in an agry mood.


Will you be so easy on the cops when they use that excuse for their behavior? Just curious if you're walking down a one way street here. Replace "not showing ID" with "tasering a trouble-maker" and re-read what you posted. Wink

Quote:
Of course this isn't an excuse for tasering a trouble maker, but it's easy to understand while being in an agry mood.
Bondings
S3nd K3ys wrote:
Bondings wrote:
Because he looks foreign, it might not be the first time that someone asks him his ID. And it can be very annoying if it is always you


Sure beats getting :pwnt: with a taser over and over by power hungry cops, don't it? Laughing

Point is, he didn't know they would be doing this as in my opinion this is not correct behaviour of cops. If they would have done that in Belgium, they would have been fired on the spot - I think. (tasers are actually not being used that I know of)

S3nd K3ys wrote:
Quote:
Of course this isn't an excuse for not showing an ID, but it's easy to understand while being in an agry mood.


Will you be so easy on the cops when they use that excuse for their behavior? Just curious if you're walking down a one way street here. Replace "not showing ID" with "tasering a trouble-maker" and re-read what you posted. Wink

I didn't say that it was an excuse, just that it was understandable and a possible reason why he didn't show it. I would understand it if they would have arrested him for not wanting to show an ID.

And I thought it was the job of cops to behave according to the rules/law and not to be lead by their emotions/mood/anger. You can't possibly compare the actions of a civilian to cops.

By the way, apparantly one girl asked the cops for a badge (which was her right) and they threatened her with a taser.
S3nd K3ys
Bondings wrote:
I didn't say that it was an excuse, just that it was understandable and a possible reason why he didn't show it. I would understand it if they would have arrested him for not wanting to show an ID.


Actually, you said it was 'easily understandable', which I agree with. I also think, not knowing how many problems the cops may have had with this trouble maker previously, they may have had an equally as 'easy to understand' reason for tasering him repeatedly. (Or any number of other reasons a cop might be in a bad mood.) Wink

Quote:
And I thought it was the job of cops to behave according to the rules/law and not to be lead by their emotions/mood/anger.


It is, just as it is the responsibility of the citizen to obey the cops and not be a threat in any way. If you act as a threat, you should be treated as one.

Quote:
You can't possibly compare the actions of a civilian to cops.


You absolutely CAN and SHOULD. Cops citizens. They're human.

BTW, I'm not justifying the cop's behavior. I'm just pointing out that they were called there for a reason. Wink
bond4154
I think it's mostly the use of excessive force that disturbs me. It could be quite possible the Iranian did NOT have his ID at the moment, but was a student. I would ask to stay as well if I were him; I mean, I'm a student, I just forgot to bring my ID along. He was targeted because he was foreign and, most importantly, an ethnic minority from the Middle East. Yes, the guards have every right to remove a person from the library who does not adhere to protocol. However, that does NOT mean that they may taser a person for that extent.

On the second thought, I'm actually quite surprised that UCLA campus security have tasers.

And, no, I'm not very certain I agree with you can compare the actions of a civilian to cops. Not that I'm saying they can't be compared. But their occupational duty in terms of civil service in the field of law and order has already drawn a rift between the responsibilities they carry and the responsibilities of other civilians. In my humble opinion? Comparing them is possible, but impractical.
Bondings
And the story continues ...

Quote:
The UCLA police officer videotaped last week using a Taser gun on a student also shot a homeless man at a campus study hall room three years ago and was earlier recommended for dismissal in connection with an alleged assault on fraternity row, authorities said.


http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-taser21nov21,0,1459046.story
S3nd K3ys
Bondings wrote:
And the story continues ...

Quote:
The UCLA police officer videotaped last week using a Taser gun on a student also shot a homeless man at a campus study hall room three years ago and was earlier recommended for dismissal in connection with an alleged assault on fraternity row, authorities said.


http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-taser21nov21,0,1459046.story


In all fairness you should post this part of the article as well as what you quoted.

Quote:
Senior Mostafa Tabatabainejad, 23, was asked by Duren and other university police officers for his ID as part of a routine nightly procedure to make sure that everyone using the library after 11 p.m. is a student or otherwise authorized to be there.

Authorities said Tabatabainejad refused repeated requests to provide identification or to leave. The officers decided to use the Taser to incapacitate Tabatabainejad after he went limp while they were escorting him out and after he urged other library patrons to join his resistance, according to the university's account.

The video shows portions of the incident, in which Tabatabainejad can be heard screaming in pain when the Taser shocks are administered.


Inciting a riot is a felony. I believe resisting arrest is (or at least can be, depending on the circumstances, which in this case involved violence) as well. Wink
Bondings
And the first incident isn't fully covered yet or a second is already there, this time the victim is dead ... (Edit, this one is a bit older actually, 4 november)

Quote:
Holyfield was the 17-year-old who a week ago was carrying a Bible and a cordless house phone down South State Street in Jerseyville. He was shouting for Jesus. Friends say Holyfield suffered from a mental illness. When police tried to subdue him, a struggle broke out.

After he was handcuffed, police jolted Holyfield twice with the Taser. He died a day later in a St. Louis hospital.


Story
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