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who know how to make wireless connection become faster?





matyus
i used pc,and i used usb wireless to connect internet but it slow..
or anyone have ideas to make it become faster?
FaLLeN
Ummm, what is your speed you should get from your ISP?
USB is way slower than ethernet so if you have a good speed, the USB could be slowing you down.
Other than that, if your rated speed is less than the USB max and it still doesnt perform up to par, try checking background apps to see if they are taking up your precious bandwidth.
badai
how slow is slow?
gh0stface
You also have to realize that the farther away from your wireless source, the less bars you'll have which will also result in a slower speed.
diduknowthat
What wireless are you using? i.e. b, g, super g, pre-n, n? Also, are you getting strong signals from your computer? But more importantly, what speed is your internet provider.
Kelvin
if your residential area has many wireless hosts present, then you'll probably need to change your default SSID and channel. These 2 setting can greatly affect connection and performance.

It'll also depend on how many people are sharing the connection, speed of your connection (broadband/dialup), distance from host, wireless type (a,b,g) etc.
Bones
If possible, use a wired connection. Wired connections are always faster than wireless.
diduknowthat
Bones wrote:
If possible, use a wired connection. Wired connections are always faster than wireless.


I agree with you on the part of always use wired connections, but there are some cases where wireless can be faster.

If you have a crappy motherboard with 10/100mbps lan, then using a super-G or faster connection would allow faster transfer speeds than wire Very Happy .
SoftStag
diduknowthat wrote:
Bones wrote:
If possible, use a wired connection. Wired connections are always faster than wireless.


I agree with you on the part of always use wired connections, but there are some cases where wireless can be faster.

If you have a crappy motherboard with 10/100mbps lan, then using a super-G or faster connection would allow faster transfer speeds than wire Very Happy .

Unless this guy has some serious internet connection, using a Super-G or faster connection isn't going to make the slightest bit of difference. Even a 10mbps lan is faster than the vast majority of internet connections.

It is important to see how fast the wireless connection is running, and the signal strength. The further away, the poorer the signal strength will be, and the slower the connection will be. Hovering the mouse over the icon for the wireless connection will give the signal stenght and speed of connection. If the signal strength is Poor or Very Poor, then you need to look at resiting the router and/or computer. If possible use external high gain aerials on the router and PC.

If the wi-fi connection speed is greater than your internet connection speed then the wi-fi should not be slowing it down at all. If this is the case, then try setting your PC up via wired lan and running a speed test to check that you are getting the correct connection speed.
diduknowthat
SoftStag wrote:
diduknowthat wrote:
Bones wrote:
If possible, use a wired connection. Wired connections are always faster than wireless.


I agree with you on the part of always use wired connections, but there are some cases where wireless can be faster.

If you have a crappy motherboard with 10/100mbps lan, then using a super-G or faster connection would allow faster transfer speeds than wire Very Happy .

Unless this guy has some serious internet connection, using a Super-G or faster connection isn't going to make the slightest bit of difference. Even a 10mbps lan is faster than the vast majority of internet connections.


Ahah yeah i know, but i was just point it out. But he will see an increase in speed while file transfer through the Lan, but that's really off topic Very Happy
roesaid
i'm used wireless connection too...
i ever make my wireless connection became faster than usual..
but you must used external wireless device that has long wire to connect at laptop/computer...

you make a large cone about a dustbin,put your device in the cone and put out the wire connection through the small hole at the hole's muzzle..
the wire then connect to computer..
more wireless wave will rebound to your device and make your internet become faster than usual..

for example,you look at radio emitter..astro..
orcaz
It may be because of the fact that you are using a USB connection. I think that USB connections have a speed limit, so it may be the limiting factor to your slow speeds.
THE11thROCK™
Check out the drivers. Check out any interference. Slow throughput can be a result of so many things. You said that your bandwidth is not up to speed. Do you have a firewall or antivirus? Maybe your PC is spyware infected. Or maybe you have a peer to peer program like kazaa or bittorrent running in the background which may cause a slow throughput. Check out the services running in the background. What OS are you using? What type of router are you using? Do you have DHCP or PPPOE? Are you connecting to the right wireless connection or maybe you might have incidentally connected to your neighbor's wifi. Is your WEP secured so that nobody connects to your wireless? Address these things so we can better assist you.
matyus
i used windows xp,i don't know what types of router it is,i used wireless at campus..i'm new with computer and i don't know what DHCP or PPPOE and WEP..please explain about that...
Jaan
Try getting a wireless card, if you're using a desktop. I guess you should get one if you're on a laptop aswell. And is it USB2.0 or 1.0? Because if it is 1.0 that is probably affecting the speed.
Cheers.
SoftStag
matyus wrote:
i used windows xp,i don't know what types of router it is,i used wireless at campus..i'm new with computer and i don't know what DHCP or PPPOE and WEP..please explain about that...

If you are using wireless at campus, then there is probably little you can do to improve the speed. The main factor will be distance from the router, and whether there are any walls or anything in the way. The only realistic thing you can do is buy a high gain external aerial for your PC. If you are using a laptop, then this may not be possible. Using a high quality PCMCIA wi-fi card with external aerial is an option for laptops, but this will probably be costly.
kucomp
matyus wrote:
i used pc,and i used usb wireless to connect internet but it slow..
or anyone have ideas to make it become faster?


Maybe you should change the settings on your router. Some routers limit you to 2 megabit speeds when you could switch it to maybe even higher like 11 megabits or even 100 megabits! Also, check to see if your router is set to using Full Duplex.
AutoTechGuy
I use a USB 1.0 external wireless device on mine, I still get full internet speed..


3,000down, 256up.

I'm connected at 11MbPS... still 8Mb faster than my internet connection.. which means there is no need to go faster...

My other computer has a PCI card.. it connects at 54Mbps.. but overkill.. because I'm still limited by my internet speed - 3Mbps.

So the simple truth is, unless you have a MASSIVE internet connection, you're not really gaining anything by going from USB to USB2, or PCI, or whatever.. because any of those connections are likely still faster than your internet connection.

Go to pcpitstop.com and do internet speed tests... need to find out of the slow speed is your ISP or your wireless connection.
xodia
matyus wrote:
i used pc,and i used usb wireless to connect internet but it slow..
or anyone have ideas to make it become faster?


try getting either a new usb adapter or new router... simple Very Happy
InfoJunkie
Although you're lan speed is far greater than your wan speed, upgrading from 10MB to 100MB will show a great increase in wan speeds. The internet isn't as simple as you get what you are told. There are several limits to connection speeds.

First, the host computer which you are connecting to has its speed limits. I host a personal website and the connection speed tops out at 120K for others who connect to it. You can never go faster than the speed that the host offers.

Second, the amount of hosts you have to pass through before you can connect affects the speed. The internet sends information in packets and they require conformation. I can ping google and get a response in about 23ms, and if I run a tracert I find about 8 separate hosts in between. That means that between packets there will be a 23ms delay.

Third, each host has headers. A header uses up space in your packet, thus using up bandwidth. Thus the more hosts you have to pass through, the slower the connection.

Fourth, each host has a speed limit. So the lowest of the host's bandwidth will be your maximum.

Fifth, your ISP is a big network. You share bandwidth with everyone on your ISP's substation. I have time warner coming out of syracuse NY. They have over 100,000 users of that substation. If the majority of them are on, then speed is substantially slow. Even though the ISP promises me 5MB I seldom exceed 1.5MB connection. That number is more of a maximum limit which you may touch if there are minimum traffic requirements.

Sixth, you modem has a fair use policy. That means there are usually rate limits. They try to give all current users about the same speed so one person's 5MB isn't causing someone else to drop below 100K.

Seventh, the modem is a computer. Things such as incoming port requests, anonymous attacks and pings all use processing power which affect speed between internet and router.

Eighth, traffic goes both ways. At any given time your incoming data may be interrupted to send an out going message. It happens so fast you seldom notice it, but it slows down the apparent speed.

Ninth, network adapters, lan ports, and usb ports, seldom operate at maximum speed due to processing requirements. To use the avaiable speed also requires the processor to jump in usage. The busier a router, and client computer are, the slower average speed will be. Not to mention bus speeds, RW speeds, and other info being sent over the same channels as the network adapter.

Tenth, adapters need to stay connected. A small amount of your bandwidth goes to sending out data about your hardware and requesting a connection to stay active.

Often times if you add a second network adapter to the same connection you will see a significant increase in speed. The second adapter can utilize speed lost through items 8 9 and 10, by offering seperate channels through which different parts of the same information can go through.

Internet companies have realized this back in the eighties. When dialup was still prevalant, they offered a dual modem connection through two seperate lines. You would then get a 128k connection instead of a 56K. This gave you a huge boost in speed even though both connections were never maximized and were connected to the same ISP network.

Yes, the other factors posted in this thread are significant, but there is more to it than what's written on the box.

Example

My personal Intranet.

Server to wireless Router has 100MB connection.

Router to client (Wireless) is 11MB.

Max speed ever obtained between Host and Client =650K.

Dual wireless connection with additional USB wireless adapter max speed over 800K.



Other things that affect bandwidth:

Encryptions
Processes offered by Host, Client, and all routers inbetween.
NAT Forwards
Amount of open ports
Firewalls
Amount of Periphrials
Types of Materials signals have to pass through
Interfierence
Router Firmware
Filesystem and Harddrive type
Operating System
and much more.
albuferque
You can always migrate to 802.11n network which is based on previous 802.11 standards by adding multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) and 40 MHz channels to the physical (PHY) layer, and frame aggregation to the MAC layer. MIMO is a technology which uses multiple antennas to coherently resolve more information than possible using a single antenna.

Two important benefits it provides to 802.11n are antenna diversity and spatial multiplexing. With this 2 characteristics you can reach data rates up to 600 Mbit/s are achieved only with the maximum of four spatial streams using a 40 MHz-wide channel. Various modulation schemes and coding rates are defined by the standard.

802.11n can help a lot in your case where wifi TX speed and RX speed are needed.
menino
What type of modem router do you have? Netgear is usually good.
Also, you might try looking up something called wokfi - which is a do it yourself project to make powerful antennas for your wifi.
http://www.usbwifi.orconhosting.net.nz/
dantechen
the connection is slow or fast depend on banwidth and hareware wifi?you should check one by one
olek87
also think that it is channel issiue.if you have a few
surrounding networks, and all of them are installed in automatic mode, they will use the same channel, had this too. switch to another and its fast again.
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