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Building Your Own PC?





xpiamchris
Is it still worth it to create your own PC's? or have manufacturing prices gone down so low, that it just isnt worth it anymore?

Opinions? Thoughts? Advice?

I want to get my hands on a decent PC for around $500, and I'm unsure of which path to take...
mikethm
xpiamchris wrote:
Is it still worth it to create your own PC's? or have manufacturing prices gone down so low, that it just isnt worth it anymore?

Opinions? Thoughts? Advice?

I want to get my hands on a decent PC for around $500, and I'm unsure of which path to take...


I don't think it is still worth it to create my own PC. But that is just me. For hardcore gamers, there are still significant savings by building your own system. At the very least, it ensure that you are totally sure what upgrade paths you have a year down the road instead of buying an expensive gaming machine and ditching it 2 yrs later for another.

But for basic users like me( mainly surfing, p2p applications, office applications, some gaming, some graphics editing, some pdf creation, a little webpage editing etc), practically any modern machine does the job for me. The only reason why I still build my own desktop machines is that those cheap retail ones come with harddisk space too small for my satistifaction.

As for you, if your applications usage does not really require a powerful machine and you are not into gaming... and if you already have an existing machine... maybe you should consider a laptop instead?
What I have at the moment is an old desktop for all my storage and p2p needs... and a laptop for practical usage. These are linked by a wifi network so I can store stuffs on the desktop and use windows networking to run or transfer them from my laptop. USD500 does get you a cheap but decent laptop.
brandonberg
if you have the required skill to assemble, install and maintain a working PC and opperating system without the need for technical support every 5 minutes, then i think it is still worth building your own PC if its one which provides a good upgrade path.

If you are prepared to shop around and you know the market reasonably well then you can pick up some really good deals. an example is with the AMD CPU's which dramatically dropped in price a couple of months back. There were good deals everywhere..

If you are only a low-end user who is after a budget PC for basic home/small business tasks, then there are some old packages which manufactures may be tring to get rid of and some bargains can be made here aswell..

really for a specific type of PC, there is no right or wrong answer for this qn. It comes down to smart thinking and looking in the right spots.. With a little brain power it doesnt matter which option you choose providing you know where to look.
ashik
well if u r confident in assembling ur own PC... u must do it... i did my PC.. it was cool but we might tend to run into toruble for every little thing... so my advice (if u r gonna build ur own PC... definitely digest the entire Manual for the components...)

there is one good thing... for assembling ur own PC./.. u get to make the choices...u can tweak the configuration infintely ... but there is good chance that there is a infinite no of ways to make stuff go wrong.... Wink

but u shud try it. at least once.. so go do it....remember to get help when u need it..

Happy PC building..
psycosquirrel
If you know how perfectly, you definently should. Clearly though, if you are asking about this, you should probably be going with a pre-made system.
william
It's definitely worth it for high end computers, and in many cases, for lower end ones. When you build a high end computer, you could save hundreds, but as basic computers are so low priced, building would usually be around the same. Most of the time I design a low end computer, I usually save around $5-$20 when compared to similar prebuilt ones.

I would say that it is still worth it because you can choose the exact parts and you can tweak it.

If it's price, then building a low end computer would be an OK option, but buying is OK, too.
Guyon
Many of the low priced PC's have cheaper components and for most people that is OK. If you put together you own PC you can put your operating system where you want it, install only what you want on it. Unlike all the junk software that gets put on for you, many of which is time limited. Also the build your own PC you can have exactly what hardware you want and things like hard drives named what you want it called.

I like the control of building my own PC. So even if it was a little more I would pay it for thing like I want them. So I guess it is like fast food versus a sit down dinner. One may be more expensive but you get exactly what you want with possibly better quality food/hardware.

Web pages like Tom's hardware live off of examining with hardware is the best.
http://www.tomshardware.com/

Good luck!
diduknowthat
If you want to buy a gaming PC, then it's definetly better to build it yourself, even for lower budget ranges. As for general home PC's, it's not really worth it.
jwellsy
How do they make cheap computers?
Like already mentioned cheap parts.
But the dastardly thing is
the parts are not only cheap crap parts
a lot of them will be "propriatary" parts.
Like Dell and their PSU's, a standard atx psu won't work in most Dell's.
They want you to have to come back to them for repair parts.
If you build a pc
then you know it can be repaired/upgraded with
off the shelf parts.

If you need just a basic pc for non gaming and little video work
then just go for a $200 used system.
neosree
I also agree that go to ebay and get a good second hand system for ur budget. If u r lucky then U will get some nice system, just in my case I got a pc with graphics card for $150, including a 15" LCD monitor and 512MB ram and 160GB hard disk. Pretty good. Try your luck on it.
orcaz
hey, does anyone has a complete guide, as to what to buy and how to build. i am planning to build my own computer, as i get frustrated when i cant really configure much of my hp computer. oso, i heard that self-made PCs haf longer warranties for individual parts.
diduknowthat
I don't know about guides, but its REALLY easy to build your own computer. Most people are afraid that they'll break something, but as long as you have common sense, and are gentle with the parts, chances are you won't break them. Just make sure all your parts are compatible and the rest is mostly common sense. If you have any questions, just ask, that's how you learn Very Happy.
angelussum
Like everyone has said, building might be good if you really want to really personalize your system, have a high-end computer and think about upgrades. Otherwise, I'd save the trouble and just go out to pick one up. They are pretty affordable these days, and come in so many flavors that you are pretty likely to find just what you want.
SGbilder
I think that to build your own pc is much better, mostly for the reason that YOU can choose the parts you want. Of course, at some places, you can choose some parts when you by a complete PC.

It's really easy to build but if you don't have the knowledge on all the different brands, dealers, parts... it may be more clever to just go and get a pre-made system.

So.., if you have the skills I would go for building one, here it's cheaper and you can tune it the way you want. But then again I don't know the market where you live.. Confused
teko
orcaz wrote:
hey, does anyone has a complete guide, as to what to buy and how to build. i am planning to build my own computer, as i get frustrated when i cant really configure much of my hp computer. oso, i heard that self-made PCs haf longer warranties for individual parts.


This site has a few guides which maybe useful for you.

http://www.pcmech.com/guides.htm

There are also plenty of forums which deal in building PC's and you can post specs and people can give feedback on them. For example one I keep an eye on is

http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/forumdisplay.php?f=842

Its an Irish forum but useful all the same. Also you check this site out too and it has a useful forums too:

http://www.buildyourown.org.uk/
Xcelerate
I think building one's own computer is useful in that it allows significant customization that precompiled packages cannot offer. Each person's needs vary, so it allows you to cut costs on the parts you don't need. I think a lot of people might be intimidated about building their own simply because whenever someone goes "Oh, I built my own computer" everyone goes "Wow! That's just amazing!", when in reality, the task is rather simple. In the long run, it would benefit people as well because perhaps they could learn a little more about how a computer works and could thus understand it better when problems arose.
Donutey
Donutey's Build Your Own Computer Guide Page 1/7
Dredge
I'll continue to build my own PC, being most of the prebuilt PC's have onboard everything, including sound and video. At that point, you're not able to actually update to another actual sound or video card, because there are isn't an extra PCI slot. Usually, on prebuilt, they don't even offer an AGP slot, which is needed for a good video card.
ForceRun
I agree with most that has been writen so far. I would say from working on budget systems like HP&Compact (MAY THEY ALL GO TO--Self edited--) and DELLs they are worthless, and if you do have a problem basic tech support is at least $100. Yes, they seem like they have great specs, and for the low price it is easy to be led a stray. Most time the system uses very low budget parts, low to no memory, and the sadest Motherboards that just sux in too many ways to name. Just find yourself buddy or a very helpful forum and with a little know-how you can easily build your own system for the same price or much cheaper with better parts that will work better than any DELL.

I had a basic computer repair class a year or so ago, and for our project I put together this basic guide to building your own system. It focus is many on how to find out what kind of system matches your needs, and what part of the system is most important to create the system that matchers your ideal system.

Note: this was before Windows Visita came around, so the main change is that for even a simple basic work station an graphics card is a good idea. Feel free to let me know if this Guide is helpful at all or just sucks, lol.
How To Build the Ideal Computer

The First Step
This is a simple guide to building the PC (home use) that is Ideal for you, your needs and wants.
The first step is to decide what your need is or in plainer words what you want to do with the PC. Here are a list of the most common types of uses:
-Word processor & internet browser
-Work station for working with Video or Sound
-Media center (Like a TiVo, Use with your entertainment center)
-Game Machine
-Any other mixture of the above or another crazy idea...


The Bottleneck System
Now the basic idea is to design the system to be most effective in the area that it will be used the most; and at the same time the save money by building it yourself $100-$500 at least. Also to save by not adding parts, power, or speed that will never be used, focusing on the part that truly matters. This is call the Bottleneck. Simply, you can buy the biggest nicest bottle but you won't be able to drink from it because the neck is too small. It in the computer sense a funnel through which the power must travel through before it can be used, this is often the case with prebuilt computer because they look for the cheapest part. And the saying is true that the chain is only as strong (or in this case as powerful) as its weakest link. I hope that the principle is clear by now.

Common Bottlenecks
After you have decided on the type of computer to build, the next step is to locate the common bottle neck for that system. This can be done through common sense, experimentation using benchmarking, and/or by researching. Overall, because most computer building project fall under the above categories to make life so much easier, here is the list of their bottlenecks (Listed in order of effect:
-Word processor & internet browser
(This is the simplest one there is, almost any computer will work fine.)
-Only bottleneck is the the Internet connect type and equipment (Modem and NIC Card)
-Work station for working with Video or Sound
(This type of system need raw processing power and storage space)
-Processor (CPU)
-RAM
-Massive Hard Drive Space
-Mid to High range Sound Card (A card with the types of commonly use input and output port you plan to use). And based on need nice Speaker system.
-Midrange Video Card
-Sightly nicer monitor
-Fast DVD/CD rom burner


-Media Center
-Knowledge to install and operate. (This is the hardest type of system to put together but requires very little computer power, if you really want this type of system, but don't want to spend the time to learn how to build it, it is a good idea to research the current products)
-Hard Disk space (To store Movies, TV Shows, and songs).
-Video/Sound cards that have the right type of connections.
-Good idea is good DVD/CD rom burner.
-Game Machine
(This can be the trickiest type of system to find the bottle necks because there are many different type of games that require different types of system resources.)
-Video Card by far.
-Sound Card
-RAM
-Processor
-Monitor (Resolution and Refresh/Response time)
-Speaker System (Quality) and Headset (Earphones with mic)
-Input devices (High quality Optical Mouse, dependable Keyboard, and Joystick for flying/ {Steering Wheel for Driving and game-pad for enthusiast only})
-Fast stable Internet access, good NIC Card.
-Fast access Hard Disk(s) with good amount of space.
-Fast access DVD/CD rom drive, a good burner is useful too.
-Awesome looking case that is durable to be pack up in case of LAN Parties.
-Any other mixture of the above or another crazy idea...
(In this case it is up to you to find the critical Parts)
Use this to create a general list of the different parts you will need, allow yourself to use what you have at hand, what is currently available, and any special deal you might find.

Getting Down to Business

Armed with the list of parts you need, you now have only have a general idea of what you need. Now you need the find the specific parts to fulfill your needs. This is the next part of this guide. What specs really matter? Here is a list of the parts with their specs in order of importance (always remember to match the different parts together to make sure they are compatible):
Processor (Basic choice Intel or AMD):
-Speed i.e. 3.2 Ghz + number of Cores Rolling Eyes
-Amount and type Memory (RAM)
-Price
MotherBoard (chosen by the Processor it supports):
-CPU support
-Price
-Options (On board Video, Sound, Ethernet, etc.)
-Will it support future upgrades (EPCI)
-Stability
Memory (RAM) (Also largely chosen by the motherboard):
-Price
-Type(DDR, DDR3,...)
-Quality
-Quantity per stick
Video Card (ATI or Nvidia):
-BenchMarks (How fast and powerful it is in reality)
-Amount and type of Memory
-Capabilities (Shader2.0, DirectX 9.c, can it run the games you plan to play.)
-Stability of Card and Drivers
-(For Media Center and Video Work Station), the different types of connection ports.
-Price (This makes the Game Machine, plan to pay)
Sound Card (Creative, Santa Cruse)
-Quality of sound
-(For Media Center and Video Work Station), the different types of connection ports.
-Price
Sound System(For Gamer and Video/Sound Work Station):
-Quality(THX Certified,...)
-Number of Watts (Power)
-Type (7.1, 5.1, ...)
-Price
-Headset: High Quality sound, volume control, and mic feature.
NIC Card (Standard, unless Wireless):
-Price
Hard Disk (Make sure it will connect to the motherboard, i.e. EIDE, SATA)
-Size
-Access speed, (consider if you want to set up a RAID configuration)
-Price
-Buffer standard 8 mb
Case (Most of the time it doesn't matter, only for gaming really):
-Cooling System
-Price
-Power Supply (quality and enough power)
-Ease of use (Clips to get in and out of the case fast)
-Moding (Does it look COOL) Window, Cables, Paint Job, and extras.
Monitor (Doesn't matter in most cases):
-Size
-Quality of Picture
-Max Resolution and the Refresh Rate at that resolution.
-Price
-Response Rate (CRTs beat LCDs here and in price)
Drives:
-Capabilities (DVD R/RW, CDR/RW,...)
-Speed
-Quality
-Price
Input Devices:
-Mouse: optical, Resolution, price and Wireless if you like that.
-Keyboard: Dependable, Price and Wireless if you like that.
-Extras (Prices and Options)
Plus all the extras: Printer, Scanner, and all that.

Finding the Parts
Now that you have the type of computer you want/need and know what parts the focus on it is time to go shopping. Most people miss the first place to look, at home. Look around and find any old/unused computers or parts. In most cases this won't be your first computer, and that the new computer will replace the your current computer. A lot can be saved, and usually you wouldn't get much from selling your old stuff anyway. In the case of building a Word processor or the Media Center, just use your old system. Then you will only need a few more parts to complete the system. If the stuff is still good shape you can reuse the monitor, keyboard, mouse, NIC Card, hard disk, and drives. Keeping in mind the bottlenecks, of course. Often the Processor, RAM, and Case are worthless.
Now with these part identified, make a list of what type of parts remain. Go online and start researching. Things to remember, if something is too good to be true, than it really is. However, there are a lot of good deal to be found. Stick to name brands in the parts that really matter. Mostly, only look at new parts. Seek out warranties. Follow normal internet safety rules, make sure the seller site has a good reputation, offers warranties, and a good return policy. Check compatibility before you finalize your list. Remember to calculate in the price of the OS and Software.
Now, line that list up as your dream list and find ways to cut back on part that really don't matter, and do some of the follow technique to make the project fit your budget. Look for special deals, Memory and Monitors usually can be found this way. Buy the second or third to best, the newest technology is usually only 5%-10% better; and the price is much lower with out the risk of being used as a Ginnie Pig as the older or second best is a proven and supported technology. Also consider future upgrading plans. Look at kits or sets (i.e. CPU+MotherBoard).

Make It Happen
Buy the parts, putting the system together usually only requires a screwdriver, so carefully slap it all together. Install the OS, update and protect the new system. Install the applications and/or Games, make sure you correctly set the setting And enjoy your perfect system.

Copyright © Nathan Johnson 2005

BTW here are some cool computers:





ssthanapati
ForceRun wrote:
I agree with most that has been writen so far. I would say from working on budget systems like HP&Compact (MAY THEY ALL GO TO--Self edited--) and DELLs they are worthless, and if you do have a problem basic tech support is at least $100. Yes, they seem like they have great specs, and for the low price it is easy to be led a stray. Most time the system uses very low budget parts, low to no memory, and the sadest Motherboards that just sux in too many ways to name. Just find yourself buddy or a very helpful forum and with a little know-how you can easily build your own system for the same price or much cheaper with better parts that will work better than any DELL.

I had a basic computer repair class a year or so ago, and for our project I put together this basic guide to building your own system. It focus is many on how to find out what kind of system matches your needs, and what part of the system is most important to create the system that matchers your ideal system.

Note: this was before Windows Visita came around, so the main change is that for even a simple basic work station an graphics card is a good idea. Feel free to let me know if this Guide is helpful at all or just sucks, lol.
How To Build the Ideal Computer

The First Step
This is a simple guide to building the PC (home use) that is Ideal for you, your needs and wants.
The first step is to decide what your need is or in plainer words what you want to do with the PC. Here are a list of the most common types of uses:
-Word processor & internet browser
-Work station for working with Video or Sound
-Media center (Like a TiVo, Use with your entertainment center)
-Game Machine
-Any other mixture of the above or another crazy idea...


The Bottleneck System
Now the basic idea is to design the system to be most effective in the area that it will be used the most; and at the same time the save money by building it yourself $100-$500 at least. Also to save by not adding parts, power, or speed that will never be used, focusing on the part that truly matters. This is call the Bottleneck. Simply, you can buy the biggest nicest bottle but you won't be able to drink from it because the neck is too small. It in the computer sense a funnel through which the power must travel through before it can be used, this is often the case with prebuilt computer because they look for the cheapest part. And the saying is true that the chain is only as strong (or in this case as powerful) as its weakest link. I hope that the principle is clear by now.

Common Bottlenecks
After you have decided on the type of computer to build, the next step is to locate the common bottle neck for that system. This can be done through common sense, experimentation using benchmarking, and/or by researching. Overall, because most computer building project fall under the above categories to make life so much easier, here is the list of their bottlenecks (Listed in order of effect:
-Word processor & internet browser
(This is the simplest one there is, almost any computer will work fine.)
-Only bottleneck is the the Internet connect type and equipment (Modem and NIC Card)
-Work station for working with Video or Sound
(This type of system need raw processing power and storage space)
-Processor (CPU)
-RAM
-Massive Hard Drive Space
-Mid to High range Sound Card (A card with the types of commonly use input and output port you plan to use). And based on need nice Speaker system.
-Midrange Video Card
-Sightly nicer monitor
-Fast DVD/CD rom burner


-Media Center
-Knowledge to install and operate. (This is the hardest type of system to put together but requires very little computer power, if you really want this type of system, but don't want to spend the time to learn how to build it, it is a good idea to research the current products)
-Hard Disk space (To store Movies, TV Shows, and songs).
-Video/Sound cards that have the right type of connections.
-Good idea is good DVD/CD rom burner.
-Game Machine
(This can be the trickiest type of system to find the bottle necks because there are many different type of games that require different types of system resources.)
-Video Card by far.
-Sound Card
-RAM
-Processor
-Monitor (Resolution and Refresh/Response time)
-Speaker System (Quality) and Headset (Earphones with mic)
-Input devices (High quality Optical Mouse, dependable Keyboard, and Joystick for flying/ {Steering Wheel for Driving and game-pad for enthusiast only})
-Fast stable Internet access, good NIC Card.
-Fast access Hard Disk(s) with good amount of space.
-Fast access DVD/CD rom drive, a good burner is useful too.
-Awesome looking case that is durable to be pack up in case of LAN Parties.
-Any other mixture of the above or another crazy idea...
(In this case it is up to you to find the critical Parts)
Use this to create a general list of the different parts you will need, allow yourself to use what you have at hand, what is currently available, and any special deal you might find.

Getting Down to Business

Armed with the list of parts you need, you now have only have a general idea of what you need. Now you need the find the specific parts to fulfill your needs. This is the next part of this guide. What specs really matter? Here is a list of the parts with their specs in order of importance (always remember to match the different parts together to make sure they are compatible):
Processor (Basic choice Intel or AMD):
-Speed i.e. 3.2 Ghz + number of Cores Rolling Eyes
-Amount and type Memory (RAM)
-Price
MotherBoard (chosen by the Processor it supports):
-CPU support
-Price
-Options (On board Video, Sound, Ethernet, etc.)
-Will it support future upgrades (EPCI)
-Stability
Memory (RAM) (Also largely chosen by the motherboard):
-Price
-Type(DDR, DDR3,...)
-Quality
-Quantity per stick
Video Card (ATI or Nvidia):
-BenchMarks (How fast and powerful it is in reality)
-Amount and type of Memory
-Capabilities (Shader2.0, DirectX 9.c, can it run the games you plan to play.)
-Stability of Card and Drivers
-(For Media Center and Video Work Station), the different types of connection ports.
-Price (This makes the Game Machine, plan to pay)
Sound Card (Creative, Santa Cruse)
-Quality of sound
-(For Media Center and Video Work Station), the different types of connection ports.
-Price
Sound System(For Gamer and Video/Sound Work Station):
-Quality(THX Certified,...)
-Number of Watts (Power)
-Type (7.1, 5.1, ...)
-Price
-Headset: High Quality sound, volume control, and mic feature.
NIC Card (Standard, unless Wireless):
-Price
Hard Disk (Make sure it will connect to the motherboard, i.e. EIDE, SATA)
-Size
-Access speed, (consider if you want to set up a RAID configuration)
-Price
-Buffer standard 8 mb
Case (Most of the time it doesn't matter, only for gaming really):
-Cooling System
-Price
-Power Supply (quality and enough power)
-Ease of use (Clips to get in and out of the case fast)
-Moding (Does it look COOL) Window, Cables, Paint Job, and extras.
Monitor (Doesn't matter in most cases):
-Size
-Quality of Picture
-Max Resolution and the Refresh Rate at that resolution.
-Price
-Response Rate (CRTs beat LCDs here and in price)
Drives:
-Capabilities (DVD R/RW, CDR/RW,...)
-Speed
-Quality
-Price
Input Devices:
-Mouse: optical, Resolution, price and Wireless if you like that.
-Keyboard: Dependable, Price and Wireless if you like that.
-Extras (Prices and Options)
Plus all the extras: Printer, Scanner, and all that.

Finding the Parts
Now that you have the type of computer you want/need and know what parts the focus on it is time to go shopping. Most people miss the first place to look, at home. Look around and find any old/unused computers or parts. In most cases this won't be your first computer, and that the new computer will replace the your current computer. A lot can be saved, and usually you wouldn't get much from selling your old stuff anyway. In the case of building a Word processor or the Media Center, just use your old system. Then you will only need a few more parts to complete the system. If the stuff is still good shape you can reuse the monitor, keyboard, mouse, NIC Card, hard disk, and drives. Keeping in mind the bottlenecks, of course. Often the Processor, RAM, and Case are worthless.
Now with these part identified, make a list of what type of parts remain. Go online and start researching. Things to remember, if something is too good to be true, than it really is. However, there are a lot of good deal to be found. Stick to name brands in the parts that really matter. Mostly, only look at new parts. Seek out warranties. Follow normal internet safety rules, make sure the seller site has a good reputation, offers warranties, and a good return policy. Check compatibility before you finalize your list. Remember to calculate in the price of the OS and Software.
Now, line that list up as your dream list and find ways to cut back on part that really don't matter, and do some of the follow technique to make the project fit your budget. Look for special deals, Memory and Monitors usually can be found this way. Buy the second or third to best, the newest technology is usually only 5%-10% better; and the price is much lower with out the risk of being used as a Ginnie Pig as the older or second best is a proven and supported technology. Also consider future upgrading plans. Look at kits or sets (i.e. CPU+MotherBoard).

Make It Happen
Buy the parts, putting the system together usually only requires a screwdriver, so carefully slap it all together. Install the OS, update and protect the new system. Install the applications and/or Games, make sure you correctly set the setting And enjoy your perfect system.

Copyright © Nathan Johnson 2005

BTW here are some cool computers:







well everything is fine but the main point is that is it really worth 2 make ur own system. Well i feel if u r content with the ready made systems then no need 2 make 1 for ur own. but if ur requirments r not met then u shud build ur own 1
ForceRun
I understand what you are trying to say, but I think you guys think that Dell and or Hp make worth while product which they don't.

I recently had to work on two different HP systems both need the system reinstalled do to corputed files and malware. After reinstalling the system using the correct cd and cd key provided by the maker, both systems would not activite. Basicly HP had sold both systems with invaild CD keys for windows! When calling HP they wanted $99.99 before they would even talk to me. And of couse Microsoft was no help either.

Also HP/Dell sell there computers with such hacked up systems where they preload their systems with all there little apps and updaters. I can easily say that most computers run at least half under any system that put together white box with the same specs. Hint: you can gain some speed from installing a clean basic copy of windows. But still you system will be no match to a normal running system...

Their parts suck, their support really sucks, and they are not much better then fly by night sellsmen. I'm really considering never working on a HP/DELL system ever again becuase they suck so bad. If you are an Owner of an HP/DELL system I feel sorry for you and will pray for you, lol.

There are good computer building companys out there, but they are rare and you will have to pay more. What I have found true is 'You get what you pay for', if you pay crap for a system crap is what you will get....
Mosquito
I custom built my PC, and I think it was worthwhile. The price for them to do it rather than me was not a huge difference but it was more fun doing it myself. I would build it yourself because then you can think for the future.... if your motherboard will be able to support new formats. If you buy sometimes computers which are already built you get stuch with old uncompatible hardware <-----This sucks it happened to my dad
orcaz
ForceRun wrote:

I recently had to work on two different HP systems both need the system reinstalled do to corputed files and malware. After reinstalling the system using the correct cd and cd key provided by the maker, both systems would not activite. Basicly HP had sold both systems with invaild CD keys for windows! When calling HP they wanted $99.99 before they would even talk to me. And of couse Microsoft was no help either.

Also HP/Dell sell there computers with such hacked up systems where they preload their systems with all there little apps and updaters. I can easily say that most computers run at least half under any system that put together white box with the same specs. Hint: you can gain some speed from installing a clean basic copy of windows. But still you system will be no match to a normal running system...

I had no problems with CD keys with both of my HP computers. However, I totally agree wif the point about preloading crappy softwares into your comp. That is the main thing I hate about HP and any other pre-made systems. Tho OEM copies of Windows are much cheaper, those comp manufacturers juz love to install rubbish apps (prolly to make you "pay" for the discounted price of Windows) which are either pathetic, out of date, e.g. having iTunes 4 installed when the latest version is 7 (mebbe it was latest version when they compiled the recovery disc) or simply useless. After every reformat, I have to spend around half and hour clearing all those "rubbish softwares" preinstalled. I uninstalled every single app until it is left with the core Windows. This is why I decided to custom build my next desktop.
Kitten Kong
Upgrading my own PC will always be the way for me, its one of the best parts of owning a PC compared to other machines.

I'm building a new case right now, oil submersion cooling based inside a 20 litre jerry can. Don't worry, when that bad boy is finished and the cuts on my fingers have healed enough for me to operate my camera, there will be pics!
DecayClan
It depends on the budget. If you have a budgt of less than 1400-1500Euro, then the ready sollutions are better...Get the offer that best suits your needs, and then change what you don't like. You will spend less indeed. But for more expensive systems, then you should build them yourself...
littletomi714
Yea. It all depends on your budget - how much you want to spend. And also what type of a system you want. For example, if you have a $500 budget or want the computer for basic word processing and web surfing, then you should buy a premade system. But if you want a gaming computer, or have no budget, go out and build yourself a computer. But building a computer doesn't have a warranty that if it gets broken. If you don't want to take that risk, then you should buy a store bought system. Also keep in mind that if you build a computer, you need to have an operating system. If you choose Windows, you're going to have to spend around 100 - 200 dollars at least on that. Plus, you will have to buy an Office Suite, Protection against threats, and other needed software. If you have a store bought system, you will probably get a deal on all these or it could be free with the purchase.
I think you should do research on the web ... cough ... www.google.com ... cough ... and look at possible choices. *You could write the pros and cons on a piece of paper and the one that has more, you should pick that one.
TheGeek
There are two clear advantages to each path.

Building your own system is really for people who know what they are doing with computers these days. It used to be that a pre-made computer was often inferior to a home built one, but now pre-mades are using the same core parts that the home builders are using. The real reason most people build their own systems is to get certain quality parts. For instance a Dell will not ship with a motherboard that supports overclocking, so if you were overclocking you should build your own system so that your sure your system has those features available to you. Another good reason is like someone said before, upgrade path, if you choose your own parts you are sure that you are getting parts that will be compatible with stuff that is coming out in the future, unlike pre-mades where you are buying certain parts but some parts are sort of up in the air as to what exactly you are getting, IE: socket type, graphics card interface, RAM brand and latencies, RAM type (though they have gotten better about specifying with some companies).

Pre-made computers are better for the average user. People who use their computer to do daily tasks. Often a people who are not what are sometimes called power users can get along just fine with a pre-made because they never upgrade their computer, let alone open up the computer for any reason. These kinds of people can often get a computer that will suite their needs for much cheaper than if they were to build it themselves. These kinds of people also often do not know how to service computers or build them on their own and as such having a single definite support team behind a computer is a plus.
ALostSoul
xpiamchris wrote:
Is it still worth it to create your own PC's? or have manufacturing prices gone down so low, that it just isnt worth it anymore?

Opinions? Thoughts? Advice?

I want to get my hands on a decent PC for around $500, and I'm unsure of which path to take...


I'd say it's worth it. The computer I'm using now has 1 gigabyte of RAM, 1000 gigabytes of space, an AMD 2.4GHz processor for about $550. I go to computer conventions and my family owns a computer store...so, I can get stuff cheaper XD.....

But yes, it's worth it.
psycosquirrel
Wow, that's quite a good price tag for a system with a Terabyte of hard drive space... Laughing
Bouncer
I dont know what prices are like in comparison but i think its still more worth buying components and building your own PC to your complete spec and budget!
ronald.helpdesk
My personal experience, with this matter, is a way more expensive computer, but quite strong equipment, I'll describe you my personal computer at home, at this point.

MotherBoard Intel
Intel Pentium 4 3.2 Ghz
Water cooling system
1 Gb Main RAM DDR 400
Nvidia Riva 256 mb
PCI NIC onboard, plus Linksys SRX-200 wireless pci
Phillips Tv Tuner
4 250 Gb SATA Hard Drives
External Iomega DVD Burner usb 2.0
PCI 4 ports FireWire card (vídeo editing and stuff like that)
20" lcd Monitor
750 Va UPS (Tripplite)
input peripherals, not a big deal, but quite comfortable
11x13 digital table (handmade graphics)

and there's some other gadgets, but they're not part of the system, as well as others I mentioned.

I'm not trying to show off, what I'm trying to say, is that a computer built by somebody that is quite exigent, might got very expensive, but, instead of comparing systems, big systems, and mid to low systems, ask yourself what is it that you want from your cumputer, primary objectives, foreing objectives, and got a suitable configuration.

The thing about if it's cheaper or not, depends on the parts you select, brands, models, quality and other stuff.

Take it easy, and get all the information you can.

Grtz dude.
Caramelo
i'd like to build a computer an intel, but i'd like some advice about the motherboard asus to buy it, but if someone knows a better motherboard i'd like that u could give me an advice... thanks
Prabhu Raj
If you are comparing prices then you should go for assembling your own PC.

If you want performance and support then go for Brandes ones Like HP/IBM/DELL

If you want to meet your requirements and the branded ones doesnt meet your requirements then also go for building your own PC.

The most important thing is what you expect and what your budget is.

You decide and you make / purchase.
Guyon
Right now it is especially good to make your own PC. Most of the remade PC's now are coming out with Windows VISTA. Many software packages, and especially games will not run on Vista. Also Mictosoft is playing big brother and monitoring what is installed.

For my money XP is still the way to go, and probably more stable at this point.
So go for the home build.

***

One extra note, just the fact you can pick your graphics ard and power supply is enough to make your own.
panic15
anither option..... buy and upgrade certain parts you need, like graphics card etc when new ones come out. Although probably be better building as you can get them off the shelf.Very Happy
xbcd
here how i see it if it is a low end pc you are better off getting prebuilt since time is money and 20 dollars is not worth the labor. Also there is support and less chance or human error and it will likely be a smaller form factor. Now for high end you are a total dumb a** to even think of buying since you can build it a bazillion times cheaper and you know exactly what goes into it and if you have that kind of money for a high end pc you probably also know what you are doing.
UnholyIntention
When you can get systems that come like this for under 1000, your better off just picking one up and tweaking it for what you want to do with it..

Processor Intel® Core™2 Quad Q6600 quad core processor with VT

* Each core operates at 2.40 GHz
* 2 × 4MB L2 cache
* 1066 MHz front side bus

Memory Installed: 3072 MB DDR2, 667 MHz, (PC2-5300) dual channel memory (two 1024 MB and two 512 MB modules) Expandable to: 8 GB (4 DDR2 DIMM slots)
Hard Drive 500 GB, 7200 RPM, SATA II hard drive
Support for up to two hard drives

Video NVIDIA® GeForce® 8500GT

* 256 MB onboard video memory
* DirectX® 10, Blu-ray™ /HD DVD™ capable
* Ports:
o VGA
o DVI-I with HDCP
o S-Video
ForceRun
??, Please just start a new thread.

I will stand by what I said two years ago
Quote:
There are good computer building companys out there, but they are rare and you will have to pay more. What I have found true is 'You get what you pay for', if you pay crap for a system crap is what you will get....


An 8500GT is a pretty weak sauce card, and cost under $70. Get a 8800GT for $150 or a 9800 GTX for $300 and come to the modern world of gaming people.

Check out what tomshardware.com put together for $500. It is so much better to build it yourself!
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/cpu-graphic-game,1907.html
MeddlingMonk
I prefer to build my own systems, as I know exactly which components (brand, specs, etc) that I'm getting. It allows me to construct the machine I require, rather than just relying on some standard off-the-shelf desktop PC. I also find that if I look in the right places, I can get the components I want at a decent price. I never buy the "latest and greatest" either, as the price tends to drop within a year or so.
peeters
i prefer to build a pc myself: it is faster, cheaper and better.

by the way: do you get more points if you have a longer post?
peeters
i always use the 'alternate pc-builder'
it's very easy to use.
snowynight
When your question showed you were not a professional, (me neither).... I recommend a Dell.
Buying a computer means everything is not perfect, but every part works together just in the probably best way.
dmystic
ForceRun wrote:
??, Please just start a new thread.

I will stand by what I said two years ago
Quote:
There are good computer building companys out there, but they are rare and you will have to pay more. What I have found true is 'You get what you pay for', if you pay crap for a system crap is what you will get....


An 8500GT is a pretty weak sauce card, and cost under $70. Get a 8800GT for $150 or a 9800 GTX for $300 and come to the modern world of gaming people.

Check out what tomshardware.com put together for $500. It is so much better to build it yourself!
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/cpu-graphic-game,1907.html


lol, strange, u can get a Radeon 4850 for €170 what is much better then the 9800 GTX
ForceRun
Dude my post was from April, when Nvidia was the only option. Ati seems to be pulling back together after 4 years of being behind. The whole graphic market is up in the air, a lot of good compatition. Augest will see some great low prices hopefully for both ATi and Nvidia. I personal have always been a Nvidia supporter from the Nvidia RIVA days (which I still have laying around), to the Geforce 2, Geforce 4200 OC, GeForce 6800 GT OC, 7900 GT (Free from eVGA), 8800 GTS 320MB, and now my current GeForce 8800 GT 512. Their drivers are solid, okay overall support, card has life time full warrenty (eVGA), powerful; plays everything but Crysis full out with a little OC, and was cheap at only $250 the day it came out. Plus the Lans that Nvidia host are ten times better then ATi hosted Lans, what more is there.

BTW don't do Dell. Whitebox all the way!
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