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is taking bachelor of science in Computer Science hard?





androjuni
i am hoping that there are a lot of guys here studying programing or anything of that sort..

i seek help..

i am a freshman college student at a university taking up BS computer science and i am having second thoughts on continuing it and i am thinking of shifting course to law.

i hear a lot about ArAy and other stuff, it really sounds challenging...

and are there a lot of high paying jobs to computer science graduates.?

is it worth the effort!?
ashok
i wil say definitely... Smile
Star Wars Fanatic
I recently talked to a Computer Programmer who said that now, a Programming job is not profitable, as all the jobs are given to people who live in India who will work for $30 dollars an hour. However, if you can get a reliable job, you can make up to $180 an hour, which is quite good pay.
boomtown15
I recently graduated from Colorado State University with a bachelors in Computer Science and have had great success with the job market. The only problem with with a technical or computer-related degree is that the market can very unpredictable. It seems that since the downturn in 2001, the market for tech-related industries isn't quite as volatile as it used to be. Yes, there are tons of large companies that are outsourcing programming jobs to India, but there are still plenty of jobs to be found and some companies do not outsource at all.

I would say it hasn't been hard to find a job, but it may be hard to keep a job for longer than a couple years unless you are in a smaller company. This is just so you are forewarned about this industry. It can somtimes rapidly change and therefore, companies downsize like rapidly to adjust. The pay for most programming jobs or jobs that require technical skills (Computer Science) is quite good. You can easily make 40-60K right out of College and you can advance rapidly in the industry if you keep up on technology. Hope that helps.
androjuni
thanks guys.. Very Happy

40k right out of college. more than enough. Cool

again, thanks!
JoseRizal
$180/hr? wow, i want that job!
i didn't graduate (not yet anyway - planning on getting it in the future). through tutoring with our IS admin and self-study and taking classes here and there, i was hired as a financial systems admin. the work consists of a lot of vba for ms office (interfacing the programs via code), some access database creation and maintenance, now we're doing dynamic webpage reporting (asp).
i make more than 40K but less than 60K. maybe with a degree, i will be paid more.
lalune
You've to be the cream of the crops to get the big bucks though! Good Luck~
jamessweeney
Hi there,

You have to really like what you do to make a rewarding career for yourself. Life is too short to waste it on studying and working in something that you do not like. Remember the saying, do what you love to do and you will never have to do a days work again.

If you do not like computers or if you are only doing it for the money or because someone suggested it to you then it probably wont be right for you. Also keep in mind you are studying to be a knowledge worker. You will have to constantly study for the rest of your career to keep up with the latest technologies (SOA, web services, AJAX etc) and to keep on top of whatever technology you use daily (Java/C++/CORBA etc).

Working in the IT sector can be very rewarding. Writing and debugging programs, drawing clean and efficient designs and seeing the end product work well with the customer are their own rewards. Again you have to really like this stuff or else you are going to really hate this stuff.

To answer your question, Computer Science is hard, however it gets easier and easier the more you enjoy studying it. Remember that once you start making progress in the course it will get easier. Things are always most difficult at the beginning when you are overwhelmed with information. Study the basics, ask specific questions (both in class and in online forums) and go from there. It will get easier as the light bulbs start flicking on in your head Smile Remember though that you will never understand everything. There will always be acronyms or technologies that you wont understand.

To address the issue of money it is true that more and more software development work is being outsourced to cheaper countries such as India, however the indigenous software industry does have alot going for it. New development processes such as agile development help reduce software development costs as they ensure a closeness of the customer and development team and also rapid releases. Software designed using SOA and web services can be developed rapidly with reduced development and integration costs. There will always be an indigenous software industry but if you want to join it you have to be motivated by a aptitude for software development. If you are good at what you do you can command quite a reasonable salary. But if money is your true motivation then look elsewhere (finance industry).

I hope this helps.
James
shwetanshu
it is indeed the effort, u get eaily 20K+ (INR) evn if u do not land in not so big company
vinx_18
Im an Information Technology student, which almost likely the same as computer science though we have many management subjects. I say that our world rocks! And we are in the Information Society now adays. So get along with this world. Persevere!
monzoncf
im a computer science student and im already in my third year. This course isn't that hard except for some of thesis...
mialynavahy
androjuni wrote:
i am hoping that there are a lot of guys here studying programing or anything of that sort..


hum not only guys, girls too lol
i m a student in software engineering and if you like computers, video games, maths, programming... it will be easy
jobs : 150$/h, yes it s possible if you have a Phd Smile or if you are in research, specialization (Artificial intelligent, e commerce...), or a great job in analysis : i know that a consultant is paid about 100 to 200$ per hour

forgive my english, speak french Sad
rano
Software engineers are needed in virtually every part of the economy, making this one of the fastest-growing job titles in the U.S. Even so, it's not for everybody.

Designing, developing and testing computer programs requires some pretty advanced math skills and creative problem-solving ability. If you've got them, though, you can work and live where you want: Telecommuting is quickly becoming widespread.

The profession skews young -- the up-all-night-coding thing gets tired -- but consulting and management positions aren't hard to come by once you're experienced. Release engineers, who are responsible for the final version of any software product, earn six figures. But jobs at the biggest companies tend to be less creative (think Neo, pre-Matrix).

Anyway here is how careers rate on salary and job prospects:

1. Software engineer
2. College professor
3. Financial adviser
4. HR manager
5. Physician assistant
6. Market research
7. Computer IT analyst
8. Real Estate appraiser
9. Pharmacist
10. Psychologist.

(Source is MONEY Magazine, Salary.com)
venkateshwarans
Computer science ain't that difficult. Law for me is faaaaar more difficult. CSE shouldn't be much trouble to you. Pay package should be pretty high for law courses.
seagullspirit
@androjuni - this is my 5th and last year of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science so I have a pretty good idea about how tough or easy it is, but all of this is as subjective as possible since it all depends on weather or nto you like stuff that have to do with computers and by that I mean programming, hardware, web design, computer networking and so on. If you like this kindda stuff its a pretty easy ride all the way. In my case I'm not a big fan of programming even tho I had to take about 6 courses which drove me nuts cause everything past joggleing with a few JS webscrips and I'm getting bored as hell with all the code lines but ifor me it worked cause I like the computer networking part.. cisco and all that stuff so I work for an ISP with a decent paycheck even tho once I graduate I'll ahve far more opportunities in the EU Wink

so, good luck with your choice and my advice to ya is to pick a domain that you're passionate about cause it will make all the diffrence in terms of how easy it will be and how good you'll ge at it.
ehab
vinx_18 wrote:
Im an Information Technology student, which almost likely the same as computer science though we have many management subjects. I say that our world rocks! And we are in the Information Society now adays. So get along with this world. Persevere!


Cool ! I am in Computer Information SYstems ( CIS ) as well : )


the market here in Bangladesh is rapidly growing . .. and yes ..the competition for rapid change is very high ..

being a programmer would require you to get over barriers and be up to date with all the latest snippets at all times : )

I am in my first year.. hoping to get a decent job even b4 graduating Very Happy i m good in graphics and editing pre-made scripts ( wordpress, jooomla , vbulletin ) and making nice sites out of it Wink ( who cant ? :p then again Very Happy )
jayrelle
I am a computer science graduate to! and yes i agree to what they say that you need to be the creame of the crop! Its very hard to take up this course but..if you have determination and passion, I think you will going succeed.and computer programmer isnt the only job you can get if you graduate from this course.. You can be an IT Instructor, a technical support, a software developer, a web developer, dbms manager, etc..so, think about it.. Wink
osbits
Firstly, it depends how hard you will work.
Secondly, it depends on which county and which school you are in.
zeene
boomtown15 wrote:
I recently graduated from Colorado State University with a bachelors in Computer Science and have had great success with the job market. The only problem with with a technical or computer-related degree is that the market can very unpredictable. It seems that since the downturn in 2001, the market for tech-related industries isn't quite as volatile as it used to be. Yes, there are tons of large companies that are outsourcing programming jobs to India, but there are still plenty of jobs to be found and some companies do not outsource at all.

I would say it hasn't been hard to find a job, but it may be hard to keep a job for longer than a couple years unless you are in a smaller company. This is just so you are forewarned about this industry. It can somtimes rapidly change and therefore, companies downsize like rapidly to adjust. The pay for most programming jobs or jobs that require technical skills (Computer Science) is quite good. You can easily make 40-60K right out of College and you can advance rapidly in the industry if you keep up on technology. Hope that helps.


I'm glad you're out of computer science hecks. I am a major in Computer Science and a freshman and I find it challenging.

There's no major that is a boat ride anyways though some a thougher (Computer Sceince happen to be) but I believe the driving force here is your interest and how much you want to put into it.

Before I got into college I was alrady doing a lot of compu' stuffs (programming, networking etc.), so I kinda found college too theoritical and maybe some fun.

The job market at rightly stated is highly unpredictable for people like us when we graduate? But are you thinking of earning $40k right out of college? you better be ready to have a better know-how than the Indian guy who would work for half of that (big companies like that).

The bottom line here is that our field is constantly changing and the best advice I'll gove you is that while taking courses in college, be a generalist (take programming classes,networking classes, and various other I.T. branches) becasue you don't know what the market will say when you're out of college. It will be painfull that when you graduate, you're an expert in Java or C++ that no one in market needs.
butross
I just finished a degree in Computer Science and Technology, and Majored in Information Systems. I finished in July 2006 and it is now January 2007 and still have not found a job. I admit I have not been looking very hard, and been taking some time off to enjoy with friends.

Now it is the new year I am more determined to get a job. But I really don't know what to apply for. I feel I have no skills, I only have customer service experience from working in retail. I always liked web design and have become quite good in Macromedia Flash. I actually got a job in web design, but I absolutely hated the place and the employer would pay us peanuts.

What type of entry level jobs should I apply for, I don't know if I really want to do full on programming, but ive always been interested in databases and web design and interactive online content. This is a website I made for fun if anyone would like to see http://users.bigpond.net.au/butross

Id appreciate anyones advice.

Thanks.
paulbarter
I studied a degree in computer science and deffinetly found it challenging and stimulating. It all depends whether you enjoy it and have the ability for it. If you do well then there should be a good job for you out there, but if you dont enjoy it then there is no reason to do it! You spend most of your waking life at work and so if its something you dont like doing then that is a huge waste, no matter how much you are earning. I see lots of people who make a lot of money but hate their job and dont have any time to spend the money they make!
virulence
Thats what I want to get too... I've heard its where the money is at and is a good thing to get, but also that after you graduate you can get stuck without a job because everyone seems to get that degree...
I don't know which to believe. I don't care either. I will get it because I love the field of study. If you like Computer Science, get a degree in it. Do what you love
cloudship
i would suggest that, if you are not fond of programming or research in programming language, then turn back as quickly as you can.

CS bachelors are engineers, but the lawyers ain't. These two populations take quite different social positions and carreer paths, both of which you should have thought about elaboratively.

last but not least, if you were an awful engineer, what you might influence is only some people. But if you were an awful lawyer, what you might influence is some populations.
skimox
only focus on your interests. never the money. i decided onto computer programming when i saw the package about 4 yrs back. Then slowly it started getting lesser and lesser. Now, i have an experience of 5 yrs, no more interest and nothing else to bank on.
azoundria
Computer Science is one of those departments where it's only as good as you are at it. If you've never programmed before, it's certainly not your thing, and you will quickly find it too hard.

If, on the other hand, you're a programming proficient, then go for it!
biljap
If you are interested in programming you should definitely go for it. Yes, it can be hard when you see some stuff for the first time, and it could even seems like something you’ll never understand… I’ve been through that. But if you are interested in it, you will work hard enough and eventually see that it is really nothing so special about it. Everything can be mastered if you work on it.
deanhills
biljap wrote:
If you are interested in programming you should definitely go for it. Yes, it can be hard when you see some stuff for the first time, and it could even seems like something you’ll never understand… I’ve been through that. But if you are interested in it, you will work hard enough and eventually see that it is really nothing so special about it. Everything can be mastered if you work on it.
I don't know much about programming myself, but my brother and law is into programming in a very big way. From what I can understand, you really have to have a passion for it to be good at it. If one is talented with programming, and has a good focus on what one wants to do career wise, then that is obviously the right path, but if one is looking for a career, and thinking about programming as a possibility, then the lack of deep passion may make it less workable than otherwise. Point is that there are millions of people out there doing all kinds of courses in programming. When they graduate either from University or College, they may not be clear about where they are going. That clarity of vision with regard to programming should already be there during the course of the studies for it to have a good chance of success later.
zbale
Today few domains can do without specialists of Computer Science -- even such areas as art, literature, etc. which are often pitted against science. The good news is therefore that CS is an expanding domain, which opens many doors, and can lead you to work in other areas of interest you may have (medicine, archeology, old manuscripts, rocket science, etc.).

That said, as has been pointed out in the various posts above, Computer Science requires a level of technicality which one may find indigestible. Don't believe, however, that other areas (such as law, art, teaching, marketing, etc.) do not require a high level of rigor: they all do, in different ways. In other words, if you have already enrolled in a CS program and your main problem is the difficulty of assimilating things, then stick to it and find ways to become good at it (there will be difficulties in every domain you will encounter anyway). If, on the other hand, you have come to realize that this is not what you want to do with your life, then find out what you want to do and go do it.
rockacola
rano wrote:
Software engineers are needed in virtually every part of the economy, making this one of the fastest-growing job titles in the U.S. Even so, it's not for everybody.

Designing, developing and testing computer programs requires some pretty advanced math skills and creative problem-solving ability. If you've got them, though, you can work and live where you want: Telecommuting is quickly becoming widespread.

The profession skews young -- the up-all-night-coding thing gets tired -- but consulting and management positions aren't hard to come by once you're experienced. Release engineers, who are responsible for the final version of any software product, earn six figures. But jobs at the biggest companies tend to be less creative (think Neo, pre-Matrix).

Anyway here is how careers rate on salary and job prospects:

1. Software engineer
2. College professor
3. Financial adviser
4. HR manager
5. Physician assistant
6. Market research
7. Computer IT analyst
8. Real Estate appraiser
9. Pharmacist
10. Psychologist.

(Source is MONEY Magazine, Salary.com)


I so disagree with that, IMHO. Shocked

Software programmer (aka/ monkeys) and IT (the its) are flooded with various of quality therefore underrated.

Successful computer rated professionals are tend to be either Senior managers, CTO or director of their own... hardly would be the specified role mentioned in the list above.
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