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Advice from a top Copy Writer... But do you agree with this?





Drastic
Quote:
"... if you really want to hear your cash register endlessly murmur its happiest mantra (ca-ching!), you must develop for each star product its own separate mini site, supported by equally vertical, dedicated, and specific Google ads and ezine marketing campaigns that drive traffic directly to that site, where prospects are then greeted with an in-depth sales presentation focused exclusively on that single product, fully explaining its compelling raison d'ętre. Don't sell "retirement planning." That phrase brings up more than 41 million results! Create a website offering a video on "How to Retire to Mexico and Live Like Royalty on $500 a Month or Less." Run a Google ad with the same headline, and everyone searching for "retirement in Mexico" can easily find you and respond.

That's it, the secret of how to sell anything online. Go vertical and go deep. Use highly specialized mini sites dedicated to a single star product, and deliver an in-depth, fully developed sales presentation to capture your prospects and convert them into customers. Once they are customers, you can then branch out, offering related follow-up sales pitches, via specialized ezines, which lead them to other highly targeted mini sites. And just keep repeating the process for every major product or service you want to sell.

Highly specialized, single-product, vertical mini sites automatically optimize your position in searches. They also make more people click on your links because, unlike most others in your market, you'll seem to specialize in exactly what that searcher came online to find. For the same reason, your highly specific Google headlines will trigger higher ad placement and higher click-through rates." Gary Bencivenga


Advice from Gary Bencivenga http://www.bencivengabullets.com/ about how to market your products. I've found many of his points quite helpful, but wondered if this "site per idea/product" approach was really the best plan.

What do other experienced website designers feel?

Drastic
SlowWalkere
I wouldn't exactly call myself an experienced web designer, but I'll throw out my opinion anyway...

I think it's a great concept, but I'm not quite sure how far he's taking the idea of a "separate mini site."

If each mini site is intended to be completely on its own and therefore not integrated into a larger web site (presumably containing all of the company's products/ideas/whatever), I don't think it's a good idea.

If, on the other hand, he means to develop a depth of material on each "product" you are offering and making that a main entry into your site, that is a good idea. For example, to continue with the retirement idea, your "Retire to Mexico" site should be integrated into your larger "Retirement Planning" site. You can design that portion to make it look like "Retire to Mexico" is your main point, but include links to other portions of your site where you discuss retirement planning in general, and retiring to other specific places.

Having specific topics and specific ad headlines could help you drive traffic to your site, but if you don't integrate that traffic into your larger site your shooting yourself in the foot. Using a "targeted ezine" to bring people to your other products is one way to capitalize on that traffic, but I think you're more likely to see follow through if people who have read what you have to say about retiring to Mexico immediately know that you offer other services as well. If you're only counting on the ezine, then your only attracting people who were enticed to leave you their contact information. What if someone decides after reading your site that they don't want to retire to Mexico but instead want to retire to Greece? They're not likely to leave you their contact information if they think Mexico is the only topic you're dealing with. So even if you have something to say about Greece, you're not likely to get it across to this new audience.

- Walkere
mikethm
Drastic wrote:
Quote:
"... if you really want to hear your cash register endlessly murmur its happiest mantra (ca-ching!), you must develop for each star product its own separate mini site, supported by equally vertical, dedicated, and specific Google ads and ezine marketing campaigns that drive traffic directly to that site, where prospects are then greeted with an in-depth sales presentation focused exclusively on that single product, fully explaining its compelling raison d'ętre. Don't sell "retirement planning." That phrase brings up more than 41 million results! Create a website offering a video on "How to Retire to Mexico and Live Like Royalty on $500 a Month or Less." Run a Google ad with the same headline, and everyone searching for "retirement in Mexico" can easily find you and respond.

That's it, the secret of how to sell anything online. Go vertical and go deep. Use highly specialized mini sites dedicated to a single star product, and deliver an in-depth, fully developed sales presentation to capture your prospects and convert them into customers. Once they are customers, you can then branch out, offering related follow-up sales pitches, via specialized ezines, which lead them to other highly targeted mini sites. And just keep repeating the process for every major product or service you want to sell.

Highly specialized, single-product, vertical mini sites automatically optimize your position in searches. They also make more people click on your links because, unlike most others in your market, you'll seem to specialize in exactly what that searcher came online to find. For the same reason, your highly specific Google headlines will trigger higher ad placement and higher click-through rates." Gary Bencivenga


Advice from Gary Bencivenga http://www.bencivengabullets.com/ about how to market your products. I've found many of his points quite helpful, but wondered if this "site per idea/product" approach was really the best plan.

What do other experienced website designers feel?

Drastic


Actually you would be better off asking website visitors? I mean, if you manufacture cars and was designing a new model... you wouldn't be asking your fellow car manufacturer what they think of your new model?

That said, since I am an experienced visitor... I would provide you with my esteemed opinion... Rolling Eyes

Site per idea/product seems valid in principle as website visitors ain't a patient lot and does not enjoy complicated websites with tonnes of links and they wanna find whatever they are looking for FAST.

However, if the products are complementary to each other... having them on the same website would be advisable.
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