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How to play chords using Right Hand





tamilparks
I need a help to play the Chords using Right Hand, I can play songs using right hand as a single note. but i need to study the chords can any one help me please...........
Kaneda
tamilparks wrote:
I need a help to play the Chords using Right Hand, I can play songs using right hand as a single note. but i need to study the chords can any one help me please...........


You're not saying what instrument you're playing, but I'll assume it's a keyboard instrument - piano or whatever. Since on the other most popular polyphonic instruments (guitar, strings in general), you rarely playing chords using only one hand Wink

You don't say whether you already know the fundamentals of chords either (for example, that a C major chord is made up of C, E and G), but I'll assume you do.

In that case, in theory it is pretty simple, but it takes practice - and fast recall of the notes in the chord in any order. The following is just something to begin with.

The idea is, the highest note you play will (mostly) be the melodic note, and you have to arrange the notes of the chord below it. The left hand will (in the simplest form of chord/melody playing) play the root note of the chord - sometimes doubled in octaves (the root note basically being the note of the name of the chord F for F minor, E for E major, C# for C#m7 etc.)

So, if you have something like this simple example excerpt:

Code:

"Melody": C D E
Chords:   C - G


First you have the note C in the melody, along with a C major chord. C major is C-E-G. You play the C root note in the left hand. In the right hand, you've already taken care of the C (the melodic note), so you need to add E and G. Hence, you also play the G right below your melodic C, and the E beneath that. So the chord looks like:

Right hand: C, Left hand: E G C

The left hand's notes form what's called the C Major 1st inversion chord - we've just taken the root note (C) and shifted it to the other side of E and G - the 2nd inversion would be G C E.

In many cases, one of these inversions will allow you to have the melodic note at the top. I.e., if your melodic note is C, E or G, your problem is solved thus far. But that's not always the case...

For example, next we have the note E in the melody, along with a G major chord. G major = G B D (in American notation, otherwise G H D). You play the G root note in the left hand. In the right hand, you haven't taken care of any of the chord notes yet (since E is not one of the G major chord notes).

So, you play the E melodic note, right below E is a D that you could use for the chord. It's perfect. Or is it? Since these two notes are so close together (1 tone/2 semitones), it'll sound dissonant (like horror music or Kurt Weill). Sometimes, for some styles, that's fine, in this case we decide it isn't. So, let's skip the D note for now. Instead, we choose to play the chord:

Right hand: G, Left hand: (G) B E.

Where's the D? We've left it out. In the major and minor chords, the least important note is the 5th. The chord will keep (most of) its sonic properties even if we leave it out. Or we could add it in the right hand, and play:

Right hand: G D, Left hand: (G) B E

There's countless (almost) ways to spread out a chord between your hands. After a while, you should get used to this inversion and rearrangement of chord notes, and do it instantly while reading music Smile

That's the basics of it. If your piano teacher is one of those who like to make pupils play simple stacked chords in the left hand, and the melody in the right, making things sound rather boomy and dissonant, this will already sound a good deal better - because the lower on the keyboard you play a chord, the more spread out it should be in order to avoid lots and lots of clashing harmonics - unless that's the intended effect, of course Wink

But there's a lot to learn yet (as there always is with music) - choosing notes for playing a chord on a more advanced level also involves thinking about counterpoint (making the chord note choices form their own melodic line(s)), dynamics (different force on different notes in the chord), arrangement (which notes to double, if any) etc. Depending on the style, it may also be appropriate to not play the chord notes all at once, but break them up in arpeggios, or play them rhythmically between the melodic notes. It all comes with practice and listening to how other musicians do it.

Ask if this made no sense Wink I have no idea what your level of knowledge of music theory is either, which makes it difficult to explain things Wink
tamilparks
thanks for your well developed theory explanation its very useful to me i am using only the Keyboard PSR 450 yamaha....... thanks a lot but i need the Chord notes

you have mentioned the chord C - CEG like that for other scales. i need can you help me
Kaneda
tamilparks wrote:
thanks for your well developed theory explanation its very useful to me i am using only the Keyboard PSR 450 yamaha....... thanks a lot but i need the Chord notes

you have mentioned the chord C - CEG like that for other scales. i need can you help me


There's quite a few sites on the web for looking up chords, but the basic idea is... It's simply a matter of counting. In the following, when I write b/B, I mean what Americans call Bb (I may write Bb at times to avoid confusion), when I write h/H, I mean what Americans call b/B Wink:

Now, there's an easier (and more standard) way to write this, rather than writing half-steps. The idea is that we have different intervals between notes, with different names, which basically correspond to the idea of white/black keys on the piano.

Remember that between each key on a keyboard (C and C#, E and F etc.), you have a semitone (0.5 tone) - it doesn't matter if it's between two white keys (E and F) or a white and black (D and D#). In other words, there isn't equal "space" between the white keys on a keyboard. Now on to the theory:

Code:

Steps  Name
0    : perfect unison (i.e., no interval - the same note)
0.5  : minor second
1    : major second (or just "second", because this is a note (d) in C major scale)
1.5  : minor third
2    : major third (or just "third", because this is a note (e) in C major scale)
2.5  : perfect fourth (or just "fourth", because this is a note (f) in C major scale)
3    : augmented fourth/diminished fifth
3.5  : perfect fifth (or just "fifth", because this is a note (g) in C major scale)
4    : minor sixth
4.5  : major sixth (or just "sixth", because this is a note (a) in C major scale)
5    : minor seventh
5.5  : major seventh (or just "seventh", because this is a note (h) in C major scale)
6    : perfect octave (or just "octave")


Now, if we use numbers for the intervals instead of "second", "third" etc., and add a "b" to intervals which are 0.5 steps lower than the major/perfect intervals, and add a "#" to intervals which are 0.5 steps higher, we get an easy way to list chord schemes. For example:

Major chord: 1 - 3 - 5

How to read that? First we have a unison (1), that's the root note. Then a (major) third - that's 2 steps (see the list) above the root note. Then a (perfect) fifth - that's 3.5 steps (see the list) above the root note. So if our root note is C (a C major chord), we can count:

c - 0
c# - 0.5
d - 1
d# - 1.5
e - 2
f - 2.5
f# - 3
g - 3.5

c - e - g

When constructing chords with C as root note, the interval numbers in the chord scheme simply correspond to the white keys on the keyboard (changed to black if there's a b/# in front of the interval).

1 = C
2 = D
3 = E
4 = F
5 = G
6 = A
7 = H
8 = C
9 = D
10 = E
11 = F
12 = G
13 = A (which is about as high as you'll mostly see in chords)
etc.

So, now we can list some other chord types:

Major: 1 - 3 - 5
C : C - E - G
D : D - F# - A
G : G - H - D
A : A - C# - E
etc.

Minor: 1 - b3 - 5
Cm : C - Eb - G
Em : E - G - H

Major "7th": 1 - 3 - 5 - 7
Cmaj7 (written in several different ways depending on writer) : C - E - G - H
Emaj7 : E - G# - H - Eb

Dominant "7th": 1 - 3 - 5 - b7
C7 : C - E - G - Bb
D7 : D - F# - A - C

Minor "7th": 1 - b3 - 5 - b7
Cm7 : C - Eb - G - Bb
Dm7 : D - F - A - C

"6th": 1 - 3 - 5 - 6
C6 : C - E - G - A
E6 : E - G# - H - C#

etc.

There's quite a few more chord schemes, but with the idea of intervals, if you know the scheme (recipe) for the chord, you can construct it from any root note, whether it's C or F#.

Here's a page listing just about any chord scheme you'll ever meet, in the format given above, along with their symbols and names. Most of them are pretty rarely used Smile:

http://members.aol.com/rw501/crdint.htm

Again, takes some practice to get used to, but in the long run, it's better than looking up the notes every time you need a F#m7 or whatever. Most pianists and keyboardists have to learn it sooner or later. And we'd have a lot more great guitarists, if more of them would learn what they're doing rather than just how to do it (read: know why holding strings at certain frets produce a certain chord, rather than just learn finger positions by heart and know that it works Wink)

As always, ask Smile
tamilparks
thanks a lot i like it very much why not you can make a webpage for a music and store these details all....... you are very much appericiated its very very help ful i will ask u if some doubt........... ok god bless u
hunterm
tamilparks wrote:
thanks a lot i like it very much why not you can make a webpage for a music and store these details all....... you are very much appericiated its very very help ful i will ask u if some doubt........... ok god bless u


I'll second that!!
jeromep
Hey tamilparks. I'd like to help you with your Piano.

See the previous post for the fingering of the chords. In this post, I'll give you chord patterns instead. I believe you can play these chord progressions as a starter.

The chord patterns listed below are all in the key of C (or scale of C) to make it simple. For each chord pattern, play it over and over and enjoy it as much as you want. Smile In addition to the chord patters, I wrote how I feel when I play those patterns. (Because music is expression. Razz )

Code:

1. C - C/E - Eb - Bb/D  (Jazzy)
2. C - F - G - F  (Classic; Sort of blues; Happy mood)
3. C - Bb - F - C  (Jazzy; Soft)
4. C - Eb - F - Bb  (Cool jazz)
5. C - Ab - Bb - F/A  (Jazzy)
6. Am - D7  (Jazzy!  Note: Scale is the twin brother of the scale of C)
7. Am - Dm - E7  (Sad; Jazz; Spanish; Or like the Samba; Depends on how you play it ofcourse)


(By the way, the letter the succeeds the "/" is played by the left hand. Smile )

Let me know if you have trouble with the chords. But I believe you shouldn't have trouble understanding the basic chords. The previous posts have a good explaination of the fingering of chords (with the right hand).

Have fun Smile
tamilparks
thanks for your help its very useful
hsadmin
I was about to tell you how to put the strings on a guitar to play with your right hand.. LOL!
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