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The 25 Most Controversial Movies Ever





clownFart
A verry well made list of movies by i-am-bored.com


The 25 Most Controversial Movies Ever

Lets start of the list with... Aladdin?




BONNIE AND CLYDE
i-am-bored.com wrote:

25 ALADDIN
DIRECTED BY RON CLEMENTS AND JOHN MUSKER (1992)
THE PLOT You know: the genie-in-the-lamp tale.
THE CONTROVERSY The American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee balked at a lyric describing the film's Arabian setting as a land ''where they cut off your ear if they don't like your face.'' Result? The studio dubbed out the lyric for subsequent releases.

24 CALIGULA
DIRECTED BY TINTO BRASS (1980)
THE PLOT This lavishly decadent film depicts the orgy-filBOLD life and death of ancient Rome's most notorious — and clearly psychotic — emperor (Malcolm McDowell).
THE CONTROVERSY Described as a ''moral holocaust'' by Variety, the film was first given a very limited theatrical release for fear of prosecution on obscenity grounds.

23 KIDS
DIRECTED BY LARRY CLARK (1995)
THE PLOT A group of teens (played by, among others, Rosario Dawson and Chloë Sevigny) prowl the streets of NYC in search of sex, booze, drugs, and other high-risk kicks.
THE CONTROVERSY Clark's disturbing vision of promiscuous, borderline-sociopathic teens was heralded by some as a much-needed wake-up call about the nation's youth. Others saw prurient exploitation. As a buffer against the furor, Miramax created a new entity, Excalibur Films, to release the pic.

22 DO THE RIGHT THING
DIRECTED BY SPIKE LEE (1989)
THE PLOT Racial tensions in a Brooklyn neighborhood escalate from amusing to tragic during the course of a single scorching summer day.
THE CONTROVERSY While the film was seen by some as a masterpiece (and earned Lee a Best Original Screenplay Oscar nom), others blasted the director as irresponsible, predicting that the film's shocking climax — in which Mookie (Lee) hurls a trashcan through a storefront window, inciting a riot — would evoke similar reactions from urban moviegoers. Thankfully, the film proved to be more of a catalyst for heated debate than a flashpoint for actual violence.

21 BONNIE AND CLYDE
DIRECTED BY ARTHUR PENN (1967)
THE PLOT Faye Dunaway is Bonnie, a bored Texas girl looking for danger. Warren Beatty is Clyde, a pistol-packing ex-con. They fall in love and kick off an infamous Depression-era crime spree.
THE CONTROVERSY Two years before Sam Peckinpah's The Wild Bunch, Penn's bloody, slo-mo bullet-riddled finale, where the young lovers bite the dust, sparked an outcry — even tough-guy actor James Garner, no stranger to shoot-outs, called it ''amoral.''


UNITED 93
i-am-bored.com wrote:

20 CANNIBAL HOLOCAUST
DIRECTED BY RUGGERO DEODATO (1985)
THE PLOT This nauseatingly graphic Italian prototype for The Blair Witch Project follows four documentarians filming cannibal tribes in the Amazon. They become lunch.
THE CONTROVERSY After its 1980 Milan premiere, the film's print was confiscated by the city's magistrate. Later, Deodato faced life in prison when Italian authorities believed the stars of his film were really killed. The actors finally appeared on TV to prove otherwise.

19 BASIC INSTINCT
DIRECTED BY PAUL VERHOEVEN (1992)
THE PLOT A trigger-happy detective (Michael Douglas) falls for a bisexual author (Sharon Stone) who's suspected of murdering her male lover with an ice pick.
THE CONTROVERSY Gay-rights activists objected to the portrayal of man-hating lesbians before a frame of film was shot and protested through the film's opening. Then there was the film's eye-popping sex, including Sharon Stone's notorious leg-crossing, which contributed to Basic's initial NC-17 rating.

18 I AM CURIOUS (YELLOW)
DIRECTED BY VILGOT SJÖMAN (1969)
THE PLOT Freewheeling Lena experiences the swinging '60s: protesting Vietnam, questioning the class system, and exploring carnal desires.
THE CONTROVERSY Before the 1967 Swedish film could open in the U.S., it was seized by customs officials concerned that scenes containing full frontal nudity and simulated sex acts were pornographic. The courts initially deemed the movie obscene, but the verdict was overturned.

17 FREAKS
DIRECTED BY TOD BROWNING (1932)
THE PLOT For his still-creepy circus noir about a midget who's conned by a greedy temptress, Browning used real sideshow performers.
THE CONTROVERSY Audiences fled preview screenings in droves. (One patron claimed the film caused her to miscarry.) Even with a castration scene cut, the National Association of Women found the film ''offensive'' and urged boycotts. It was banned in Atlanta and pulled from distribution; it was forbidden in the U.K. until the early '60s.

16 UNITED 93
DIRECTED BY PAUL GREENGRASS (2006)
THE PLOT An ultra-vérité re-creation of the tragic heroism surrounding — and inside — the only hijacked 9/11 flight not to reach its intended target.
THE CONTROVERSY Greengrass' virtually-there experience may have been a little too close for comfort for some moviegoers. Even the trailer's suggestion of the movie's content prompted audiences to shout Too soon! One New York City theater pulled the footage from its preview reel after many viewers (one left sobbing) complained.


THE WARRIORS
i-am-bored.com wrote:

15 TRIUMPH OF THE WILL
DIRECTED BY LENI RIEFENSTAHL (1935)
THE PLOT Riefenstahl's notorious documentary of the 1934 Nazi rally at Nuremberg elevates propaganda to seductive Wagnerian grandeur.
THE CONTROVERSY While intellectuals still ponder the ethics of admiring so malevolent a masterpiece, others have had more visceral reactions. In the early '40s, director George Stevens was so disturbed by the film that he joined the Army the next day. Protests greeted Riefenstahl (who never shook her Nazi-tainted past) at a 1974 Telluride Film Festival tribute, and the Anti-Defamation League decried a 1975 screening in Atlanta as ''morally insensitive.''

14 THE WARRIORS
DIRECTED BY WALTER HILL (1979)
THE PLOT Members of a street gang battle their way through a New York City populated by rival gangs (''Warriors, come out to plaaay!'').
THE CONTROVERSY Hill's lurid nightmare of urban warfare was widely condemned for glorifying violence. Reports of criminal incidents where the film was shown — including the stabbing of a teenager in Massachusetts — fueled the outrage, forcing Paramount to temporarily pull its print and TV advertising for the film.

13 THE DA VINCI CODE
DIRECTED BY RON HOWARD (2006)
THE PLOT A professor (Tom Hanks) unearths a 2,000-year-old conspiracy to cover up the marriage between Jesus and Mary Magdalene.
THE CONTROVERSY It didn't end up drawing mass pickets or boycotts, but there was much debate while the film was being made. Westminster Abbey wouldn't allow Howard to shoot inside its halls, and some 200 protesters mobbed the set in Lincolnshire, England (although Howard says most were merely ''trying to get autographs'').

12 THE DEER HUNTER
DIRECTED BY MICHAEL CIMINO (1978)
THE PLOT The Vietnam War shatters the lives of three Pennsylvania steel-mill workers.
THE CONTROVERSY By the time it won the Best Picture Oscar, Deer Hunter had ignited major debate over its shocking POW-camp scenes, in which American soldiers are forced to play Russian roulette. War historians argued there was no record of such atrocities, and others called the Vietcong depiction racist. Cimino called the criticisms ''beside the point.''

11 THE MESSAGE
DIRECTED BY MOUSTAPHA AKKAD (1977)
THE PLOT Anthony Quinn plays Mohammed's uncle in an epic telling of Islam's origins.
THE CONTROVERSY The movie rankled Muslims and sparked riots, and that was just during production. Post-release, in March 1977, Hanafi terrorists took more than 100 people hostage in Washington, D.C. — killing a reporter and shooting the city's future mayor Marion Barry in the two-day siege — demanding in part that The Message be banned. (It wasn't.) In a cruelly ironic coda, the Syrian-born Akkad died amid al-Qaeda's coordinated hotel bombings last fall in Amman, Jordan.


NATURAL BORN KILLERS
i-am-bored.com wrote:

10 BABY DOLL
DIRECTED BY ELIA KAZAN (1956)
THE PLOT A Mississippi cotton-gin owner (Eli Wallach) humiliates a competitor (Karl Malden) by attempting to seduce the man's still-virgin wife (Carroll Baker).
THE CONTROVERSY Written by Tennessee Williams, the film struck Catholic leaders as lewd. (A similar flap greeted 1943's The Outlaw over Jane Russell's bust.) New York's Cardinal Spellman forbade the faithful to see it ''under pain of sin.'' Some theaters pulled it, but it eventually earned four Oscar nominations.

9 LAST TANGO IN PARIS
DIRECTED BY BERNARDO BERTOLUCCI (1972)
THE PLOT A disaffected American (Marlon Brando) travels to Paris, where he throws himself into an affair with a young Frenchwoman (Maria Schneider).
THE CONTROVERSY Critics and audiences were sharply divided over this X-rated erotic psychodrama. The film's stark (as in naked) depiction of loveless, animalistic carnality horrified some — and landed its director and stars in an Italian court on obscenity charges.

8 NATURAL BORN KILLERS
DIRECTED BY OLIVER STONE (1994)
THE PLOT Homicidal lovers (Woody Harrelson and Juliette Lewis) cut a blood-soaked swath through America.
THE CONTROVERSY Though intended as a satire on the media, the film actually inspired several copycat killers to seek their own 15 minutes of fame, some even using imagery and dialogue from the film. Over 12 murders in the U.S. and abroad have been linked to Killers. One victim's family tried to sue Stone and Warner Bros.

7 THE BIRTH OF A NATION
DIRECTED BY D.W. GRIFFITH (1915)
THE PLOT Griffith's epic follows the travails of two families during the Civil War and Reconstruction.
THE CONTROVERSY The film's depiction of African Americans as childlike, conniving, or rabid sex fiends, and the Ku Klux Klan as heroic saviors, sparked nationwide protests by the nascent NAACP. (It also became a KKK recruiting tool.) Censorship debates and protests have dogged the film in subsequent rereleases and when it was added to the National Film Registry in 1993.

6 THE LAST TEMPTATION OF CHRIST
DIRECTED BY MARTIN SCORSESE (1988)
THE PLOT Jesus (Willem Dafoe) pursues his calling but, in a Satan-induced hallucination, dreams of a normal life that includes sex with Mary Magdalene.
THE CONTROVERSY Religious fundamentalists picketed and threatened boycotts weeks before its release. One group offered to buy the $6.5 million film from Universal to destroy it; some theaters, and later Blockbuster, refused to carry it. Oh, and the French rioted.


A CLOCKWORK ORANGE
i-am-bored.com wrote:

5 JFK
DIRECTED BY OLIVER STONE (1991)
THE PLOT The true story of how New Orleans district attorney Jim Garrison (Kevin Costner) investigated conspiracy theories about President Kennedy's assassination.
THE CONTROVERSY Some saw Stone's documentary-on-steroids-like interpretation of those theories as lending them a certain patina of truth — raising fears that moviegoers would construe it as bona fide history. One result: a 1992 congressional act to release classified documents (which revealed nothing).

4 DEEP THROAT
DIRECTED BY GERARD DAMIANO (1972)
THE PLOT Distraught over her inability to enjoy sex, a young woman (Linda Lovelace) goes to a doctor (Harry Reems), who tells her the condition can only be treated, um, orally.
THE CONTROVERSY Intellectuals championed the film for striking a blow for First Amendment rights, while conservative leaders got it banned in many places and put Reems on trial for obscenity charges. Lovelace herself later denounced the film, claiming that while filming ''there was a gun to my head.''

3 FAHRENHEIT 9/11
DIRECTED BY MICHAEL MOORE (2004)
THE PLOT Dubya's multitude of (alleged) sins, including the alliance between the Bush clan and Saudi Arabia and botched chances to prevent 9/11.
THE CONTROVERSY The documentary lit the fuse of right-wing America, detonating protests and hate campaigns to ban it (no dice). Moore was the first to break the post-9/11 moratorium on Bush bashing and set off a season of brutal smack-downs among the Bill O'Reillys and Keith Olbermanns of the world.

2 A CLOCKWORK ORANGE
DIRECTED BY STANLEY KUBRICK (1971)
THE PLOT Teen troublemaker/gang rapist Alex (Malcolm McDowell) gets brainwashed by a futuristic English government so that he becomes deathly ill every time he encounters violence.
THE CONTROVERSY You mean besides its irreverent use of Gene Kelly's ''Singin' in the Rain''? That the movie first landed an X rating and was deemed pornographic across the U.S. was nothing compared with its reception in the U.K.: Social uproar and reports of copycat crimes led Kubrick to withdraw Clockwork from distribution in his adopted country. It wasn't officially available there again — in theaters or on video — until 2000, a year after his death.


THE PASSION OF THE CHRIST
i-am-bored.com wrote:

1 THE PASSION OF THE CHRIST
DIRECTED BY MEL GIBSON (2004)
THE PLOT You know the part in the Bible where Jesus gets betrayed, tortured, and crucified? That's it. That's all of it.
THE CONTROVERSY Gibson's intention — born of his deep Catholic faith — was to produce an unflinching depiction of Christ's suffering on behalf of mankind. What he succeeded at best, however, was igniting a culture-war firestorm unrivaled in Hollywood history. For months prior to its release, The Passion was both denounced and defended sight unseen amid reports that the film wasn't just brutal, but compromised by dubious biblical interpretation and anti-Semitic sentiment. Gibson refused to let concerned parties view and vet his self-financed film, even as he was giving Passion previews to Christians as part of an unprecedented church-targeting promo push. Ultimately, moviegoers pretty much got the experience they were expecting, while Gibson got a $370 million gross — plus a provocative new reputation.

Written and reported by Mandi Bierly, Jason Clark, Clark Collis, Steve Daly, Neil Drumming, Jeff Jensen, Paul Katz, Jeff Labrecque, Chris Nashawaty, Tim Purtell, Joshua Rich, Erin Richter, Josh Rottenberg, Christine Spines, Benjamin Svetkey, Alice Lee Tebo
La838
I agreed with most of that list, especially with THE PASSION being 1st. Good site too, thanks.
HDirtwater
This list is actually from a recent issue of Entertaiment Weekly. Pretty much dead-on as far as I'm concerned.
Octaeder
Good list that. Nice to see that they weren't afraid to put in films like Aladdin which would usually overlooked because of being Disney.

Also good to see some of the more obscure films (like the amazing Freaks) being given a mention.
ainieas
The list did make for some interesting reading.
twisthigh
Why is Aladdin a contraversial movie? I LOVE that movie, it's amazing, bu far the best Disney movie ever.
ainieas
I so agree with Cannibal Holocaust. I remember I felt like puking more than twice in the film. A net search surprised me when this movie was called a masterpiece of its genre. To tell the truth, if I had seen the movie without anything on my mind I'd say the director just wanted to see a LOT of naked people.

The Last Temptation of the Christ - I found it kinda human version of a Godly story. I don't know how to say it. I mean it made Christ more human than Heavenly.

The Da Vinci Code - I don't understand how the movie came under such a scanner when the book had already sold 36 million copies.

Passion of the Christ - I'd say the controversy of the movie was completely outdone by the beauty of the movie. But I guess the anti-semitic feelings were aroused in the passionate. I think there was a controversy about a line where Jesus says something like that they'll be cursed for ever or something. Don't remember much.
jveezy
I'm surprised that Birth of a Nation isn't higher but I still agree with most of that list.
shinnoyami
I also agree with the list, Kids was a messed up movie, couldn't bare to watch it to the end. a clockwork orange- very well made and it made me wonder about society and were we are headed.

I guess this is what most of these movies are about, thruths that society doesn't want to accept.
nitesh
You forgot to mention "Salo" also known as "Salò o le 120 giornate di Sodoma" ... its the most controversional movie ever made and maybe the sickest one too. Its so strictly banned in many countries that getting a copy of it is terribly hard.
clownFart
nitesh wrote:
You forgot to mention "Salo" also known as "Salò o le 120 giornate di Sodoma" ... its the most controversional movie ever made and maybe the sickest one too. Its so strictly banned in many countries that getting a copy of it is terribly hard.


I didn't write the list, and I bet theres a torrent of that film some were, but were not alowed to discuss that
healyrj
Quote:
A movie is rarely made with such intense creativity. The artistic quality is completely unique, stunning and makes this visually exciting.

Two souls meet and are soul mates beyond reality. Sunlit beauty entices you into the story. Emotional elements take hold of your heart and capture your attention in a way only one other movie has. This is a modern version of Somewhere in Time, with a more inventive twist. Only that movie made me feel the same way. What Dreams May Come is far more creative and captures the emotions of life with such truth. Yet, seems to have a similar theme.

When Chris Nielsen and Annie meet on a lake, they never imagine they will go to hell and back, in life and in death. This is an intellectual look at how heaven and hell might be and is worth watching for those aspects alone. This is a journey into Chris' mind in life and in death. Robin Williams (Chris) and Annabella Sciorra's (Annie) acting is so wonderful. I kept thinking it is a sign of a good actor when they can play so many parts in one movie. Annabella's character goes from goddess to suicidal mother and then tortured soul. Robin's character goes from calm to courageous.

Chris and Annie go through more than the normal human will ever be required to endure. When Chris dies and finds out his wife has committed suicide, he vows to find her tortured soul and bring her back to the heaven he has created for himself in his mind. He says something so profound about life and explains how he misses, books, naps and kisses. It will make you value life more.

This is a quest for everlasting love and happiness in the afterlife. While I don't believe in reincarnation, that aspect plays a role in the story which is amusing. The originality in this movie is beyond creative. Having Chris end up in a heaven made of paint when he loves paintings was so wonderful! The flying creatures were so incredible and the fact that you could be anyone you wanted to be, freeing.

A movie that will deepen your belief in a heaven and may even cause you to seek God and discover your soul. The aspects of respect, loyalty, courage, family, trust, love, belief in someone and endless devotion play out beautifully in the characters lives.

This is a movie I will watch again and again and am so pleased I purchased it. Life can take us in its teeth and shake us around. It is in the next life where we will gain our reward or punishment.

"I didn't get to say goodbye." was what Chris said in this movie and that hit me hard because I just lost my grandmother and didn't get to say goodbye to her. Realizing that she is perhaps in the heaven of her dreams, maybe cooking in a kitchen of her imagination with my grandfather, maybe riding around in my grandfather's boat in an ocean of his imagination made me feel more at peace with my loss.

A deeply spiritual and intellectual story about issues we all care about! Don't miss it, it is spectacular and magical.
pudovkin
I think "Eraserhead" disturbing. And so nice, of course.
And I don't think any Michael Moore film controversial.
gr3gg3r
American History X

I'm surprised that one wasn't on there. That is quite a powerful movie about racism and what the consequences are within families and society as a whole.
angelussum
There's a lot of controversal films out there.

For some reason, it amuses me that Disney's Aladdin made it to the top 25.
jenice
I agree with most of the list. Alladin should be at the top of the list. All controversial issues aside, my friends and family have watched it entirely too much.

The Da Vinci Code I actually liked. Then again, I never did watch it as a truthful conspiracy. It was just entertaining.

Fahrenheit 9/11 on the other hand I truly did enjoy. It was over-done and boring it parts, but the overall gist was fine for me. I'm not really a fan of Bush either, but that's another story.

The rest of the list I whole-heartedly agree with.
conrutr
most of the movie is good
lyddi8
In 2002, a French movie called Base-Moi was banned in Australia after having already been screened for almost 3 weeks...oops!
There was so much controversy and debate about whether it should have continued to screen, about democratic rights, etc, etc.
I didn't get to see it, and i don't know what all the fuss was about- apparently it's very sexually explicit (?)

Personally, Happiness directed by Todd Solondz was a bit of a shocker!! There are a few scenes in it that are just sickening.
Scaramanga
nitesh wrote:
You forgot to mention "Salo" also known as "Salò o le 120 giornate di Sodoma" ... its the most controversional movie ever made and maybe the sickest one too. Its so strictly banned in many countries that getting a copy of it is terribly hard.

Yeah I agree Salo should definitely be on that list. Although I would say that in the US it's not that hard to find, if you know where to look (bootlegs of it exist all over the place.) Of course amidst it's controversy I think people have to be aware that it's an adaptation of de Sade's "120 Days of Sodom" and as such was a moral study on society.
Fake
I've seen Cannabil Holo, and it looks damn real to me, and I thought it was real too. I was so shocked to watch it.
Pretty good list you've got there.

Also clock work orange was disturbing in the beginning, but I found it every educating though.
pudovkin
"Last temptation of Christ" is a tough one, huh.
xorcist
I knew The Passion Of The Christ would be one of them up there.
gerontius
Where's Borat Smile
Jagshemash

P.S. Wait for Bruno... that movie will be even funnier than Borat. Can you imagine an Austrian gay designer travelling around the world and doing interviews Cool
Andrew426
Scaramanga wrote:
nitesh wrote:
You forgot to mention "Salo" also known as "Salò o le 120 giornate di Sodoma" ... its the most controversional movie ever made and maybe the sickest one too. Its so strictly banned in many countries that getting a copy of it is terribly hard.

Yeah I agree Salo should definitely be on that list. Although I would say that in the US it's not that hard to find, if you know where to look (bootlegs of it exist all over the place.) Of course amidst it's controversy I think people have to be aware that it's an adaptation of de Sade's "120 Days of Sodom" and as such was a moral study on society.
I agree with these two, it should be on the list. It has been described as "one of the most disgusting and disturbing films ever made" by many people - but the book is a whole lot worse.

Quote:
I've seen Cannabil Holo, and it looks damn real to me, and I thought it was real too. I was so shocked to watch it.
Thats because the animals they caught and killed were real, and all of them (with the exception of the spider and snake) were eaten by locals after filming of those scenes took place.

I think this list is pretty well written, but if you want to find about really controversial films, take a look at Wikipedias list of banned movies.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_banned_films
ramadangroup
Yes its good
onemoment
i couldnt believe in a progressive country such as australia (where im from) they would ban movies like baise-moi and ken park. its just unbelieveable. shouldnt we have, as responsible adults, the freedom of speech and freedom of choice to be able to watch the movies we chose to, instead of having a small uptight group tell us what isnt and isnt suitable?

even though i am a massive fan of independent/arthouse/foreign films, in particular i found the french film irreversible incredibly offensive. though this is my own fault for watching it, this does not mean that i would want to stop other people from watching it and getting something out of it. there are heaps of movies that are in poor taste. if people think they're going to be offended, dont watch it. its that simple. Evil or Very Mad
bassman
How about Brokeback Mountain? I thought that one was pretty controversial.
jenice
bassman wrote:
How about Brokeback Mountain? I thought that one was pretty controversial.


It really is, but oddly enough is this trend with Hollywood getting more socially aware of such issues (or at least putting up a good front about it), I think they did surprisingly well.

Still should be on the list though.
mattchun
There are several Korean movie we considered controversial that is directed by Kim, not listed.
varon
I loved Aladdin, still do. Didn't really think of all the racist comments there are in the lyrics -- I personally don't think they are political attacks, just rather a way to come up with a good rhyme. Of course, I'm not offended because neither the culture in question and the culture doing the "bashing" is mine.

So The Last Temptation of Christ by Martin Scorsese is up, as as it should be. Being Catholic, I think it should have been at the top. That is absolutely one of, if not the, most blasphemous movies I know. (I haven't seen it, and would never want to, but from the summary I saw at another site, it's just horrifying for any Christian.)
Scaramanga
varon wrote:
So The Last Temptation of Christ by Martin Scorsese is up, as as it should be. Being Catholic, I think it should have been at the top. That is absolutely one of, if not the, most blasphemous movies I know. (I haven't seen it, and would never want to, but from the summary I saw at another site, it's just horrifying for any Christian.)

How can you say a movie is blasphemous if you've NEVER seen it? I'm sorry a movie summary on the internets dosn't count. People also said Kevin Smith's Dogma was blasphemous. I wonder if people even know what that word means?

"Blasphemy: A contemptuous or profane act, utterance, or writing concerning God or a sacred entity."

I don't think the intent of either film was contempt or profanity, hence it doesn't qualify. Also, when are people going to learn that movies are FICTION. There are lots of movies that don't coicide with my world views, that doesn't mean I can't enjoy them as fictional stories.
jenice
Scaramanga wrote:
How can you say a movie is blasphemous if you've NEVER seen it? I'm sorry a movie summary on the internets dosn't count.


That's always been my one point of contention with some of the films out there that are have objections to the subject matter. So many of them are dismissed out of hand simply on principle, and not on fact.

For that film specifically, I've had discussions with my own family on it. Some of them hated the idea of it, but I couldn't help but argue the point. You've got high-ranking church officials that took the time to see it and give it their stamp of approval. What does that make of the folks that dismiss it without knowing anything about it.

Yeah. Small pet peeve that...
Crazy_Canuck
Does anyone besides me think a distinction needs to be drawn between films that are controversial because they portray violence or sexuality graphically and for their own sake, versus those that challenge the status quo political or social norms in a provocative, but artistic, way?

I look at that list and might split it into two: one that contains films that challenged and perhaps even changed how/what films were or could be; another that contains films that created a public furor but perhaps didn't further filmmaking or viewing in any constructive way.
Fake
Thanks for the list, saving it for later reading
Fake
WOW!
Just read teh whole thing. I've seen a few of them,and at one stage did beleive cannabil holocaust was real.
Stupid Me Surprised
missdixy
United 93 should have been first....
TurtleShell
Crazy_Canuck wrote:
Does anyone besides me think a distinction needs to be drawn between films that are controversial because they portray violence or sexuality graphically and for their own sake, versus those that challenge the status quo political or social norms in a provocative, but artistic, way?

I look at that list and might split it into two: one that contains films that challenged and perhaps even changed how/what films were or could be; another that contains films that created a public furor but perhaps didn't further filmmaking or viewing in any constructive way.


I completely agree with you.
HoytJolly
Aladdin – don’t forget the famous “hidden sound bites” in this film.

Natural Born Killers – This film would by in my top five. It made me sick watching it. However, I could not tear my eyes off it!
gandalfthegrey
There are many movies missing from this list that should be on it. Pasolini's Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom should be on the list. Many films from the 70's, such as Fritz The Cat, that were regarded as highly controversial at the time.
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